city of aspen

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

Penthouse owners and worker bees to use same door

May 18, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

  Three Aspen residents are finally able to use the front door to get to their apartments in a downtown building, after a judge ruled the condo owners above them have no right to deny them access. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Pitkin County District Court Judge Gail Nichols released a 90-page ruling Friday. It found JW Ventures, the developer of the building on E. Hopkins Ave., unlawfully represented to Michael Sedoy and Natalia Shvachko that they would have exclusive use of the east door and elevator to their two-story penthouse.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

Aspen High School principal Kim Martin resigned after only three years on the job.

More complaints are surfacing about the proliferation of pot shops in family friendly Glenwood Springs weed.

Meanwhile, a major commercial development proposal for one of the last big open space in the valley has been pulled by the developer.

And, with summer comes traffic. Residents in the West End neighborhood of Aspen say keep it on Main Street and not on theirs.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

The embattled principal of Aspen High School announces her resignation.

A tax in Aspen is generating an extra $2 million annually. The public is getting a chance to decide how to spend it.

Finding affordable housing is always a challenge, but right now, Mid-Valley residents are facing significant hurdles.

A mentoring organization is seeking men, especially in Basalt and Carbondale.

And, a Carbondale resident is in the middle of Nepal’s aid effort. We talk to him about the latest earthquake to hit the area.

The City of Aspen is finding itself with an extra $2 million every year from what’s called the real estate transfer tax, or RETT. And Aspen residents will have an opportunity in the coming months to weigh in on how to spend it. Then next year they’ll be asked to vote to renew the revenue stream and where it should be spent. Right now it’s dedicated to the Wheeler Opera House. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason talked with City Manager Steve Barwick about the possibilities.

City considers suing Precise over parking scam

May 11, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

  Aspen’s multi-year parking scam may not be resolved. The city is considering suing to get back some of the money it lost. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Officials claim they were lied to by the company that sold them the pay stations. The city’s parking department thought the company, Precise Park, was flagging debit cards with zero balances when they were processed the end of each day. Randy Ready is assistant city manager.

Ginny/Flickr/Creative Commons

It’s election day in Aspen and if you haven’t yet turned in a ballot, voting centers will be open from 7am to 7pm. 

People can vote at City Hall or the Red Brick Center for the Arts on East Hallam Street. If you still need to register, head to the Pitkin County Clerk’s office then bring your registration certification to either voting center to cast a ballot. Voters who filled out a mail ballot can drop those off at the voting centers. You can register until 7pm.

themountainpact.org

A group of Western towns known as the “Mountain Pact” are sending a letter to Washington DC this week, urging lawmakers to hold the coal industry accountable. The group wants royalty payments from coal to fund efforts by communities to adapt to climate change. The City of Aspen is part of the Mountain Pact. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Ashley Perl, who’s working on the effort for the city of Aspen.

Ashley Perl is the Director of the City of Aspen’s Canary Initiative. 

Carolyn Sackariason

The City of Aspen is finding itself in the position of many employers in the valley who find it difficult to attract qualified employees. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

The city manager’s office had to re-open the job posting for a parking director after the first round of 28 applicants didn’t produce the right candidate. One individual from outside of the area was offered the job but declined because of the cost of living and the lack of affordable housing.

aspenpitkin.com

Another development application has been submitted for a downtown building in Aspen. Already five projects have been turned into the city in advance of tomorrow’s election when a change in the charter amendment could affect projects getting approval. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.    

Downtown landlord Mark Hunt is under contract to purchase the old Guido’s Swiss Inn, as well as the structure next to it, known as the Salmon building because of its color. Both are on the Cooper Avenue Mall.

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