city of aspen

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

The “Living Lab” project that widened Castle Creek bridge for pedestrians and cyclists is being removed today and tomorrow.

Wilderness Workshop

After the city took a rare step in seeking public input, staff is rejecting the overwhelming suggestion to abandon the rights. David Hornbacher, who is heading up the project for the city, wrote in a memo to city council that staff recommends keeping those rights.

Chris Council / Aspen Daily News

A top prosecutor in Aspen is joining the city’s legal team.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journaiism

City of Aspen staff is directing council to keep water rights for reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this goes against public sentiment.

Carolyn Sackariason|Aspen Public Radio

 The Downtowner, the electric shuttle that offers rides in Aspen, has carried more than 11,635 passengers in more than 4,996 rides. There are a total of five vehicles. The first season was so successful that the City of Aspen is extending the service for another year, meaning it will go until Sept. 15, 2017.

The majority of construction waste in the valley is going straight to the county landfill and elected officials are hoping to curb some of that. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times and Randy Essex, publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

You can hear more of the conversation at 3:30 p.m. today.


courtesy photo/City of Aspen

The City of Aspen will hold its first “Citizens Academy” this fall. Municipal governments from across the country have used similar programs to help residents get to know the inner-workings of their local government, and Aspen is now following suit.

Aspen Public Radio News

The City of Aspen hosted an open-house discussion last week about its water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks, but interested locals still have a lot of questions.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is holding a public open house today to discuss its conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen is looking to curb emissions, and soon truck drivers could face a $500 fine for excess exhaust smoke.

More cars towed this Fourth of July

Jul 5, 2016
Courtesy of Aspen Chamber

The City of Aspen towed twice as many cars during this year's busy Fourth of July festivities compared to 2014.


Aspen’s grand plan to open up more parking has gotten strong reactions. Aspen Public Radio checked in with workers and tourists to find out what their feedback is, now that the effort is more than a month old.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

A management plan has been adopted for the Crystal River but getting ranchers to agree to divert less water is still a challenge.

Keeping water in the Crystal

And rivers around the state are about to hit their peaks.

And in Glenwood Springs, a rare collision between a truck and an Amtrak train has made headlines.

The city of Aspen hosted an ice cream social at Bugsy Barnard Park Wed., June 1, to get feedback from the public about the new configuration of Castle Creek Bridge.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Wednesday afternoon the city of Aspen is hosting its first public gathering to collect feedback about the new configuration of Castle Creek bridge. The reduction in street lane width in April made room for a temporary expansion of the bike/pedestrian trail along the north side of Highway 82.

From 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. the public can give input, ask questions, and go on a tour of the “living lab” at an ice cream social to be held at Bugsy Barnard Park on Cemetery Lane. Several other public events are scheduled this summer, and a survey is available online.

  Two local governments are joining other Colorado cities and counties to collectively lobby for climate change legislation.

 The annual Aspen Police Department bike auction raised a record amount of money for the city.

Elise Thatcher

A supervisor can have a bigger impact on a worker’s health than a primary care doctor. That’s according to the The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The federal office recently sent experts to Aspen to teach managers how to handle that power wisely.

 This is from the Cross Current archives. This program takes an in depth look at the recent prescribed burn in the Hunter Creek Valley, why it was scheduled and what results can be expected.

  A city of Aspen employee was able to bypass the affordable housing lottery system by claiming a medical hardship, jumping ahead of dozens of other locals who would have competed for the house in a subdivision on the east end of town. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup today are Aspen Times columnist Roger Marolt and Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News.