Computer Tech

Valley Roundup - July 18th, 2014

Jul 18, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup.  It’s a review of the top news stories of the week in Aspen and beyond.

Joining us today are Andy Stone, former editor of and now columnist for the Aspen Times and Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News.

This week there was a double-homicide in El Jebel.  The same week a pedestrian was hit and killed on highway 82, this comes on the heels of a high profile murder in Aspen and the death of a rafter.  Today we reflect on how big city this all sounds.

Also, are we loving the outdoors to death?  Judging for the Conundrum Hot Springs…maybe so.

Proposals are lining up for what to do with the old Aspen Art Museum, we look at the Lodging incentive program and the strange partnership of Lee Mulcahy and Maurice Emmer.

On the download with Rob St. Mary a how-to for safe sexting.  It’s all ahead on Valley Roundup.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories of the week in the Roaring Fork Valley.

This week - Fracking. 

Aspen Public Radio and the Aspen Times toured a drilling and hydraulic fracturing rig in Parachute recently and this week our stories ran.  Joining us are Scott Condon reporter for the Aspen Times and our own Elise Thatcher.

On the November ballot this year voters will have a number of fracking issues to decide, among them whether local communities should have control over oil and gas exploration.

Our reporting looked at one fracking operation run by WPX Energy.  It is one of the big players in the industry.  We got an up close look at what is going on at drilling rig H & P 318.

McCloskey Speaker Series - The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution featuring Walter Isaacson

President and CEO of the Aspen Institute Walter Isaacson will speak about his forthcoming book, set to be released in October, 2014, by Simon & Schuster. Mr. Isaacson is the author of Steve Jobs; Einstein: His Life and Universe; Benjamin Franklin: An American Life; and Kissinger: A Biography, and the coauthor of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made.

Airbnb: How the Sharing Economy is Redefining the Marketplace and Our Sense of Community

Airbnb does business in 34,000 cities, has a valuation of over 10 billion dollars, and in a very short time has disrupted the world of hospitality and travel. Its co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky envisions the future city as a place where sharing is front and center — where people become micro-entrepreneurs, the local mom and pops will flourish once again, where space isn’t wasted, but shared, and more of almost everything is produced, except waste. But the journey from here to there won’t be all smooth sailing. What are the ups and downs of the sharing economy, as businesses like Airbnb confront critiques about regulation, economic development, and fairness? What role might businesses play in creating more shareable, more livable cities? How will the sharing economy, with its de-emphasis on ownership, be a tool for addressing urban inequality?

Brian Chesky, Jennifer Bradley

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

A judge has released hundreds of pages of court documents in the Nancy Pfister case. We’ll have a quick review.

The sheriffs are in town-- for a statewide conference. This is a chance for Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo to show off his work in Aspen.

Officials and local representatives are tackling how to get faster internet access in rural areas.

Aspen wants to get more people to build hotel rooms...

And, Garfield County may have to help pay for some improvements near Glenwood’s Grand Avenue Bridge.

An Aspen nonprofit is heralding the cancelation of a mega dam project in Chile.

And a hydropower plant in southwest Colorado is now officially up and running… we’ll hear what that means for the Aspen.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

http://ventureburn.com/

The future of rural broadband in the Rockies is being discussed this week in Vail. The Mountain Connect Rural Broadband Conference seeks to bring together stakeholders to talk about ways of improving service. Christopher Mitchell is with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance based in Minnesota. He is attending the conference. Mitchell spoke recently to Aspen Public Radio’s Rob St. Mary about how co-ops could help improve broadband service in the rural West.

Valley Roundup - June 6th, 2014

Jun 6, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason from the Aspen Daily News and Michael Miracle from Aspen Sojourner magazine.

The judge in the Nancy Pfister murder case this week rescheduled a preliminary hearing for later in the month.  She also denied a motion to allow separate trials for the accused.

The building housing Aspen’s Explore Booksellers is on the market.  It unclear what that means for the bookstore

Also this week, a plan to open a small business incubator in Aspen.

And activist and artist Lee Mulcahy loses an appeal of his ban from Aspen Institute property.  He is also still banned from Skico properties and the Aspen Art Museum.

On the Download with Rob St. Mary we look at how best to increase and distribute broadband access in the mountains.

It’s all on this week’s Valley Roundup.

People living in many parts of rural Colorado still don’t have access to high speed Internet. It’s a problem for schools and businesses, and in eastern Colorado it is making it harder for farmers to take full advantage of the latest technology even as state lawmakers passed legislation to try and even the playing field.

Valley Roundup - April 24th, 2014

Apr 25, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Curtis Wackerle from the Aspen Daily News and Michael Miracle from Aspen Sojourner magazine..

This week, Aspen City Council gave the cold shoulder to the much debated hydro-electric power plant proposal.  The city will instead pursue other renewable sources of power.

Council also agreed in principle this week that Aspen’s core should be allowed to get louder at night than current noise rules allow.

Also today some case files in the Nancy Pfister murder are opened but they reveal little.  And more construction and an upgraded credit rating provide more evidence that Aspen has emerged from the great recession.

Valley Roundup - April 11th, 2014

Apr 11, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason from the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone from the Aspen Times.

This week, the prosecution’s case against the accused in the Nancy Pfister murder moves closer to being unsealed.

Commercial Real Estate in downtown Aspen is moving and with it come the closure of the Ute City Restaurant and the sale of the building that’s home to the Aspen Daily News.

Also today keeping things behind closed doors…Aspen Valley Hospital calls off what some say was a stealth board of directors election

On the Download with Rob St. Mary malware and heartbleeds, from hospitals to Google searches it seems nothing is secure anymore.

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