Development

Elise Thatcher

  It’s now more likely that Aspenites will decide the future of a lodge on Main Street. Aspen City Clerk Linda Manning says there are more than enough valid signatures to have a ballot measure in the fall. Petition organizers want Aspen residents to decide whether to allow the “Base 2” project.

Flickr/hmclaird

  The Town of Basalt has hired a financial firm to find out how much money a developer could make near downtown. The proposed redevelopment is controversial, and officials have been hashing out what would be a good fit.  Basalt is now working with a Minnesota firm on reviewing four different redevelopment options.

Concerns about how Aspen is developing prompted a city councilman Monday to ask for an analysis of development projects already approved. 

Aspen resident Ward Hauenstein told council Monday he’s worried.

"City government has had the vision and courage to limit growth. I fear that our representatives have lost that vision and courage."

Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the week's top stories.

aspenpitkin.com

The City of Aspen is in the throes of deciding where to put government offices in the future. Tuesday afternoon (7/14) council narrowed three options to two. 

City departments like police and engineering are currently in leased space that before long, will become unavailable. City council is examining two solutions. Both include building new structures and have price tags above $48 million.

 

Petitioners are getting signatures in an attempt to stop a hotel from being built in Aspen. As of last week, organizers have beyond the 680 signatures needed to get on the ballot for a public vote later this year. The question would be whether a hotel, called Base 2, should move forward.

Screenshot, Holland & Hart LLP

A Florida development company wants to build a new Four Seasons Hotel near Aspen’s “S” curves, but there’s a major hurdle first. Miami-based Cisneros Real Estate wants to annex nearly seven acres of County land at the base of Shadow Mountain in a residential neighborhood.

On Tuesday night, Carbondale elected officials began discussing a proposed new City Market in town. Town Trustees decided to waive a layer of community review of the project.

plexiglassplus.com

A change to Aspen’s development requirements is not retroactive. That’s the opinion of an attorney hired by the City after a recent charter amendment. Voters decided last month that an election is needed if developers want exceptions for how big a project can be, or how much affordable housing or parking is required.

GrassRoots TV screenshot

Aspen City Council swore in members new and old Monday night. That included a grassroots organizer known for criticizing the group. Newly elected Bert Myrin took an oath with returning councilman Adam Frisch.

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