Stay Aspen Snowmass

  Aspen and Snowmass Village had a record-setting amount of hotel reservations this fall. But winter bookings are still lackluster. This fall hit a high water mark with overnight bookings, following on a busy summer. A long stretch of good weather plus last-minute reservations in October played a big role.

A group that advocates for young people wants to create a mentorship program they say would grow Aspen’s economy.

As summer winds to a close, the Aspen Skiing Company is looking ahead to winter. They’re counting on international visitors from typical players like Australia and Brazil, but also new countries. Ski-Co Director of Worldwide Sales Kristi Kavanaugh says international visits make up 30 percent of the company’s annual revenue, and the community benefits. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen.

Kristi Kavanaugh is Managing Director of Worldwide Sales for the Aspen Skiing Company. Last year was the Skiing Company’s best year ever for international visitation.

Elise Thatcher

Starting a small business isn’t for the faint of heart. But it can be a key way for residents to make ends meet in the Roaring Fork Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story of one longtime local who’s trying a new restaurant venture this summer in a unique place: a horse trailer.


Elise Thatcher

The Roaring Fork Valley broke records for visitors last summer. So far Aspen and Snowmass Village are on track to be even busier, and more expensive, this summer. Resort tracker DestiMetrics says overnight bookings across the West are up about 8.5% compared to last year. Aspen and Snowmass Village are seeing about the same numbers.

The numbers are out for this past ski season [2014 - 2015]. More than 7 million people visited Colorado’s ski resorts. That’s down slightly from the record-setting season one year before.

Jon Fredericks/LANDWEST

The Roaring Fork Valley Regional Planning Commission will review a proposed housing development in El Jebel today. It’s a project that could bring needed affordable homes to an area seeing barely any inventory and skyrocketing prices. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher continues our series on the housing shortage today with an exploration of new proposed developments, and some already in the works.

Joleen Cohen

Finding decent housing in Aspen and parts of the Roaring Fork Valley has always been difficult. But the increasing shortage in rentals, especially in the Mid-Valley, is having a significant impact on residents. In the first in our series about housing in the Valley, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.


Elected officials in Basalt heard results Tuesday from a study done on affordable housing. A Denver-based research group looked over wages, housing costs and job growth and delivered mostly negative findings. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Suzanne Wheeler-DelPiccolo is principal of Basalt Elementary School. She says finding affordable housing is a constant challenge for her staff of teachers.

"When you hire new people, as a principal, I’ve helped people look for apartments and find places to live because it’s that challenging," she says.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

   Has Aspen become too expensive for middle class residents? We’ve examined what it takes for retail shops to survive downtown. as business owners are facing challenges like rising rents and increasingly slow off-seasons.  Next, we talk with locals to find out how they're balancing life in the Upper Valley. For many, living in a different town is one of the solutions.