Education

Allison Johnson

Two schools in the Midvalley are welcoming new school administrators. The Roaring Fork School District announced new principals at Basalt High School and Crystal River Elementary School in Carbondale. 

Matthew Koenigsknecht will lead Crystal River Elementary School. He was a language arts teacher in Denver and managed a summer program at Basalt Elementary School.

Peter Mueller will take the reigns at Basalt High School. He works for The Nature Conservancy and served as principal at Telluride public schools. Mueller also worked in Evergreen, Colorado at a private school.

Facebook/State Rep. Millie Hamner

State Representative Millie Hamner is back home in Summit County after a busy legislative session. The former school superintendent sponsored several education measures including one that will reduce testing. Hamner’s district includes Pitkin County. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Millie Hamner represents House District 61 at the Statehouse, which includes Pitkin County.

Today on CrossCurrents, the Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork with Anne Menconi, Karin Andrade, and Diana Baetz.

http://www.waldorfschoolrf.com/

http://www.coloheadstart.org/programs/Eagle-County-School-District-Early-Childhood-Program

Eagle County’s Head Start released its annual report for families helped in 2014, showing that the program serves ten families in the El Jebel and Basalt area. Maggie Swonger is Early Head Start Manager for the county, which presented its latest report to Eagle County Commissioners this week.

A bipartisan measure to reduce testing for students in Colorado's public schools is not proceeding as planned through the statehouse. Senate Bill 215 [.pdf] was scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Education Committee Thursday. No longer, it was pulled from the calendar before the hearing.

"We just need to make sure we get the policy right," said state Senator Owen Hill (R-Colorado Springs), a sponsor of the measure along with Senator Andy Kerr (D-Lakewood).

The sponsors are unsure of when SB 215 will get a hearing. The bill would eliminate mandatory assessments in the 11 and 12th grade and reduce redundant tests in the earlier grades. It has been billed as the major school testing reform bill of the session.

Jeff Leahy is the head of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He talks about CRMS's longtime outdoor and classroom-based curriculum, the future of the education landscape, and how CRMS is looking to improve their programs. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org

Kayo Ogilby is the Science Department Chair at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He shares his teaching style, and talks about the culture of the school. CRMS is unique in many ways, but the athletic teams really stand out. The school has a large soccer and cross-country ski team, but there's also a telemark skiing and climbing team (among many other mountain sport clubs). 

Visit www.crms.org to learn more about the school's academic curriculum, outdoor programs, and sports teams. 

Molly Dorais is the Director of Admissions at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. She discusses the school's unique curriculum and programs, and the types of students who attend CRMS. The school is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization, so tuition goes directly into the school's programs, faculty, and facilities. While the price tag might shock prospective students and their families, Dorais discusses CRMS's generous financial aid program. 

To learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, visit www.crms.org

The Colorado Rocky Mountain School's 60-year history is chock-full of interesting characters - people who believe work in the classroom should be coupled with physical work and outdoor education. The end result: a curious, knowledgeable, and well-rounded 18-year old. Mark Clark started his journey with CRMS in 1979. He is a CRMS faculty member and splits his time between Carbondale and Wyoming. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org.   

Your Evening News - January 15th, 2015

Jan 15, 2015

Glenwood Considering New Meadows Development

Tonight Glenwood Springs Council will take an early look at a proposed development at the Glenwood Meadows Shopping Center. It would add nearly two hundred housing units and commercial space to the bustling shopping complex.

The new development proposal includes 174 residential units and nearly 6,000 square feet of commercial space as well as amenities like a coffee lounge, business center, and gym.

Andrew McGregor oversees Community Development for the City of Glenwood Springs. He says City Council must keep in mind the area has been assessed for mudslides.

“We’re very in tune with the geologic environment out there, and of course very concerned with making sure that all construction is done taking that into full consideration.”

McGregor says the Meadows has structures in place to help prevent slides. The business and energy of the shopping center, which includes stores like Target and Lowe’s, is one reason McGregor thinks the development will be a good fit.

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