Education

Creative Commons/Brad Flickinger

The Aspen Community School is one of the top-ranked schools in the state, according to a new analysis. The school near Woody Creek, ranked six out of 500 middle schools.

The organization Colorado School Grades releases its report card annually. Nearly 2000 public schools are ranked. The group uses data from the Colorado Department of Education and a formula that looks at academic achievement, academic growth and gaps in education.

Deb Rice, Executive Director of ACCESS, and Mindi Cabe, Program Director of ACCESS, share their hopes for the future and invite qualified locals to get involved. ACCESS after-school programs hire teachers and qualified instructors to teach a range of classes from art and yoga to radio broadcasting and cooking. 

To learn more about ACCESS programs and how you can get involved, visit www.accessrf.org

Jeremy Voss, the Principal of Basalt Middle School, speaks about the importance of scheduled after-school programs for Middle School students and how ACCESS Roaring Fork has given his students new opportunities outside of sports and other school-related activities. Beth Wysong is a former teacher and ACCESS liaison. She says the connection ACCESS is making between the community and students is crucial for maintaining healthy communities. 

Learn more about ACCESS Roaring Fork at www.accessrf.org

ACCESS provides after school and summer programs for students between Basalt and Rifle. Mindi Cabe, Program Director, and Deb Rice, Executive Director, discuss ACCESS's three main programs and why it's important to pay attention to what elementary and middle school students do when school is not in session.

To learn more about ACCESS, or how you can become an instructor, visit www.accessrf.org.  

What do kids do after school? Sports, tutoring, and organized programs of course. But what about the kids who aren't interested in sports, or can't afford expensive after school programs? That's where ACCESS comes in. Deb Rice is the Executive Director for the Carbondale based Non-Profit. Mindi Cabe, the Program Director for ACCESS, also contributes. 

Learn more about ACCESS at www.accessrf.org

Today on CrossCurrents, Roaring Fork School District is holding a series of community meetings throughout the month to discuss the RFSD Facilities plan.

Guests are Dr. Diana Sirko, Superintendent of RFSD and Shannon Pelland, Assistant Superintendent in charge of the Facilities Project.

http://www.rfsd.k12.co.us/

Elise Thatcher

On Sunday, October 5th, Aspen High School hosted just under three thousand students and parents from Lake City, Durango, and other far flung Colorado towns. They quizzed University representatives and took workshops as part of the Colorado Western Slope College Fair. It’s been around for years, but this time, the focus was on helping students with the details, like essay writing and affordability.

Elise Thatcher

Colorado Mountain College is turning its focus to what kids are learning before they walk in the door. Right now more than half of incoming students are severely lacking in certain subjects, usually math and English. So now the community college… the largest such network in the state… is working on finding a way to improve what kids are learning in elementary, middle, and high school. It’s part of a larger effort to better serve mountain communities.

Kate Lapides

A growing education program in the Valley is teaching preschoolers how their brain works so they can focus on learning. The “Focused Kids” program is being taught to low income, mostly Latino kids, in a unique preschool. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, this new program is happening inside a school bus.

Inside El Busesito, a small group of students and teachers are playing games on the carpeted floor. It’s a comfortable space that doesn’t look at all like a bus. The seats have been removed to make way for books and toys.

Marci Krivonen

On Thursday we told you about how the Aspen-based Valley Marijuana Council is working on educating people about retail pot. Today we’ll explain how the State of Colorado is using tax money from marijuana sales to create an education campaign of its own. The Colorado Department of Public Health is planning to roll out television commercials, radio spots and billboards early next year around how to use marijuana safely.

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