Elise Thatcher

Arizona Public Media

Ken Rudin is a political reporting veteran. He’s keeping keen eye on this fall’s elections--including the battle Colorado’s U.S. Senate seat, and governor’s race. Formerly with the NPR, Rudin was perhaps best known for his segment called Political Junkie, on Talk of the Nation. Rudin continues to report on politics. He was recently in Aspen for an event with Aspen Public Radio, and he took a few moments to talk with reporter Elise Thatcher. 

    

The American Renewable Energy Day, or AREday, continues in Aspen. Participants are exploring all manner of angles about clean energy… and also what tactics to take against oil, coal, and other fossil fuel development. 

http://gardner.house.gov/

Both candidates for Colorado's U.S. Senate seat have stopped by Aspen this summer. In July it was Democratic incumbent Mark Udall; this weekend it was Republican Congressman Cory Gardner, who currently represents much of Colorado's Eastern Plains. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher sat down with Gardner, during a busy afternoon at the Hotel Jerome. They talked about many of the same issues we put to Senator Udall earlier this summer. [Click to open and listen to APR's radio edit and longer unedited interview.]

Elise Thatcher

Pitkin County Republicans gathered at the Hotel Jerome on Saturday to rally around a long list of local, state and national candidates running for election this fall. There was a strong turnout... especially for a county better known for its left leaning constituents. The main event was Congressman Cory Gardner, who’s taking on Democratic incumbent Mark Udall.

Elise Thatcher

Part of Aspen's Jewish community is preparing for a major upgrade when it comes to events, classes, and services. The new Aspen Chabad Jewish Community Center and Synagogue opens to the public tomorrow, Thursday August 7th, in the evening. Rabbi Mendel Mintz and his wife, Leiba co-direct the center. Theirs is one of three Jewish congregations in the Aspen area. Aspen Public Radio sat down with Rabbi Mintz as workers were putting on the finishing touches.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen’s West End is filled with stately older homes. Many are empty during the off season, but during the summer the neighborhood picks up. And in that new life, the Aspen Historical Society holds regular walking tours to show off vintage beauty, and tell some good tales about years gone by. 

Roaring Fork Transit Authority

 

 More people are riding the bus in the Roaring Fork Valley than ten years ago. That’s according to new data gathered by the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority, or RFTA. The agency conducted a ridership survey in March for the first time in a decade. To learn more, APR's Elise Thatcher talks with transportation expert Jim Charlier. His firm Charlier Associates is reviewing the survey results. One trend he sees is fewer people driving, because more are telecommuting. 

Good afternoon, and welcome to Mountain Edition.

You’ve probably noticed we’re in our summer pledge drive this week… so today we’re bringing you an update on the latest local news.

Like efforts to restrict drilling on the Thompson Divide… lots of business in the valley this summer... and what we know now about theories on who may have been involved in Nancy Pfister’s death.

Then we’ll hear some of our favorite stories over the last several months… One man says he’s the only Ute tribal member who lives in the Roaring Fork Valley.

And, we chat with a local rabbi considered one of the most inspiring in the country.

We’ll hear about one of the tough issues in the Roaring Fork Valley. Heroin overdoses have claimed several lives this year.

As for the pledge drive, thanks if you’ve already made a gift or renewed your membership. If not...it’s time.

Because nearly half of Aspen Public Radio’s funding comes from listeners like you. Please consider making a pledge, at whatever amount is comfortable.

Call us at 920- 9000 during regular business hours, or give anytime on the interwebs, that’s aspen public radio dot org.

We’ve got lots of good stories for you during this special pledge drive edition of Mountain Edition... starting now.

Elise Thatcher

 

Judge Gail Nichols, in Aspen, has released some of the details in why law enforcement originally arrested three people this spring in the death of Aspen native Nancy Pfister. One of the three, William "Trey" Styler, confessed last month to murdering her in February. But questions continue about why Styler's wife, and a long time local, were also held for months without bail on murder charges. 

Huffington Post/Associated Press

Supporters of oil and gas production will hold a discussion tonight in Aspen. The Pitkin County Republicans are hosting filmmakers who have challenged the premise and facts behind the anti-fracking film “Gasland.” One of the goals is to figure out whether or not fracking is a good idea.  

Pages