Elise Thatcher

Screenshot from aspeninstitute.org

Colorado residents can vote this fall on whether communities can limit oil and gas drilling. The state supreme court approved four ballot measures Monday, June 30th, that allows such questions. The decision comes as Democratic Governor John Hickenlooper is in Aspen, speaking at the Ideas Festival about existing rules for the industry. He was joined yesterday by the head of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp.

Outside Magazine

   As the cycling world gears up for the Tour de France start this coming Saturday, July 5th, the sport is still dusting itself off. A generation of riders were found guilty of cheating in the late nineties through mid-two thousands. One of the most well-known riders was part-time Aspen resident Lance Armstrong who is now stripped of his many wins and banned from the sport. Organizers and riders alike say the sport is far cleaner now. Armstrong and two other former pro cyclists took some time to look back on the choices they made, and what comes next.  

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

This week, Republicans decided who’s going to run against Democratic governor John Hickenlooper this fall.  Bob Beauprez is a former Congressman and wants to put government red tape on ice.

Republicans also chose to keep Representative Scott Tipton as their candidate for the sprawling 3rd Congressional District and we’ll hear from his Democratic opponent, Abel Tapia.

Finally, to get a break from all the politics, we’ll take a tour of Aspen’s Smuggler Mountain and its profitable mining history.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition, right now.

Elise Thatcher

Court appointed lawyers for Kathy Carpenter strongly believe she is innocent in the case of Nancy Pfister’s death. On Friday, June 20th, attorneys Greg Greer and Kathleen Lord held an unusual meeting with reporters. Greer said, “in thirty two years, I have not had a case like this.” You can hear audio of the meeting here.

Elise Thatcher

Last Friday saw a strange turn in the case of what happened to Aspen native Nancy Pfister. One of the three defendants pled guilty in court and was sentenced.  Murder charges were dropped against the third and last defendant, but she wasn’t completely cleared, and attorneys raised questions about what they say were major mistakes in the investigation. 

Elise Thatcher

 

A judge sentenced William "Trey" Styler today to 20 years in prison for 2nd degree murder in the case of Aspen native Nancy Pfister. Styler plead guilty, saying it was crime of passion, and that accepted responsibility for Pfister's death. 

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

There were surprising new developments this week in an Aspen murder case. We’ll have the latest.

The Pitkin County Commissioners approve a stop-gap measure to prevent mega events in environmentally sensitive areas. A huge wedding on the back of Aspen mountain prompted the move.

In Aspen Governor Hickenlooper apologizes to law enforcement for mistakes made with the state’s new gun laws.

Several sheriffs in Aspen for a conference are concerned about legal marijuana.

And, employers are figuring out pot and drug policies for workers.

Finally, we check in with newly insured locals who purchased health insurance plans through the state exchange.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Picture Ninja

There have been major developments in the Nancy Pfister case this week. First the District Attorney’s office decided to drop charges against one of three murder defendants. Now, it’s considering doing the same for another defendant, who’s scheduled to appear in court Friday morning.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

Several charges have been dropped in the case against defendant Nancy Styler. Styler is one of three charged with murder and conspiracy to commit murder against Aspen native Nancy Pfister.  Pitkin County Judge Gail Nichols ordered Styler's charges be dropped on Tuesday, June 17th, after the 9th Judicial District Attorney's office filed a motion the same day, saying the DA's office believes "there is insufficient evidence to prove the defedent's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, and the [DA's office] do not believe there is a reasonable likelihood of success on the merits at trial."

Elise Thatcher

     Adjusting to new health insurance rules has been a big shift for just about everyone involved in health care--whether it's patients, nurses or insurance workers. Six months ago the Affordable Care Act started requiring nearly everyone have insurance. We were curious to do a check-up and find out how patients are getting used to new healthcare plans. 

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