health care

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week brought the first big snow in the valley just ahead of ski season and with the flakes also comes Free Parking in Aspen as the investigation into the parking scam continues.

In Glenwood Springs, the city and county are battling over a new facility to help get those packages there overnight.

Also, it’s health care season, the time when employers alert their staffs to new changes for the new year. But, is there something bigger that needs to change?

And an Aspen conference is looking at tourism and building a more dignified approach marijuana just as the nearby town of Paonia says "No" to recreational pot.

Joining us this week are Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, Editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Andy Stone, former editor of and now columnist for the Aspen Times.

Getting your blood checked can mean making an appointment, getting to a doctor’s office, and fees. But for older folks in Pitkin County, regular senior health fairs make it much easier. They’re part of a wider variety of fairs put on by Aspen Valley Hospital, which hosted one on a recent Friday.

Five employers efforts to improve health care and lower insurance costs is shifting into high gear. The group, known as the Valley Health Alliance, has a new Director and was part of a forum yesterday. Details on what the Alliance may try in the next year were discussed-- and mental health will be at the top of the list.

Valley Roundup - September 26th, 2014

Sep 26, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week  - Vice President Joe Biden and his 44-car entourage storm in an out of Aspen.  Criticism rises in his wake.

The gig is up for the secret to free parking in Aspen.  It has been costing the city more than fifty thousand dollars a month.  The finger pointing has begun.

Also this week, we talk bears.

And, a Denver Business Journal health care reporter helps explain why insurance rates might actually be going down in the roaring Fork Valley.

Colorado Medical Society

Health insurance in the Roaring Fork Valley will be cheaper next year for some residents. The average premium will cost about seven percent less. For someone paying three hundred dollars a month, that’s about twenty dollars less for each payment. One reason for that is some doctors and hospitals are treating patients for less. And the state’s top association for physicians is worried that may have unintended consequences.

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