health care

A significant chunk of workers in Aspen have high blood pressure.That’s according to data from health fairs last fall, coordinated by the five biggest employers in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley. They’re part of the Valley Health Alliance, a new nonprofit aimed at improving health in the Upper Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

Marci Krivonen

Health care, violence and the wage gap are a few topics to be tackled at this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival. The 10-day event started Thursday (6/25). 

It’s the Festival’s eleventh year and this year it looks different.

"We decided to freshen it up a little bit and change some things around, and we’re sitting in a new pavilion," she says.

tedeytan/Flickr/Creative Commons

  Health insurance rates for the Roaring Fork Valley area will increase again next year. But for most companies, monthly fees are not going up by as much as they have in the past. That’s according to the Denver nonprofit, Colorado Consumer Health Initiative.

Creative Commons/Flickr/North Charleston

A veterans center that opened in Carbondale’s Third Street Center a year ago is already looking for a new home. Though some vets have been helped with things like housing and employment, more vets may use it if it was in Glenwood Springs. That’s according to Michael Conniff. He’s with the Western Slope Veterans Coalition and spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Michael Conniff is with the Western Slope Veterans Association, an organization that’s looking for a new home in Glenwood for it’s veterans center. They hope to announce a new space in July. 

Improving access to dental healthcare for communities between Aspen and Parachute is no small feat. So it's safe to say that the Aspen to Parachute Dental Health Alliance has plenty of work ahead of them. Among with their strategies and goals are some challenges. Cristina Gair, Executive Director of the Dental Alliance, and Kelly Keeffe, the Regional Oral Health Consultant for the Dental Alliance, discuss the challenges and future of the organization. 

Learn more about the Dental Alliance and their programs at

Today on CrossCurrents, Carrie Marsh, director of the Aspen office of Komen Colorado and Toni Panetta, Director of Mission Programs for Komen Colorado on the recently announced  grants to provide treatment dollars in Pitkin, Garfield and Eagle counties.

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about something called Doctor in a Box.

“It’s telemedicine that you can have in the privacy of your own home, or you can actually take the kit with you while you’re traveling and have consistent access to health care.”

The idea comes from a firm who also came up with a bike you probably saw on facebook or twitter last year. Yes, we’ll hear where the Denny Bike is now.

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fifth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we sit down with a recently retired FDA commissioner.

As part of her tenure, Dr. Margaret Hamburg focused on how the U.S. can make sure food and medicine coming from other countries is safe.

Later in the program we’ll hear the argument in favor of hospital mergers and some of the results from one in New York City.

That’s coming up, here on Spotlight Health.

Good afternoon you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fourth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear from a health expert who noticed patients spend a lot of time in hospitals without much to do and how that changes when there is art and music in the building.

“I witnessed moments where patients would listen to the concert, and that could be the last beautiful thing they’ve heard.”