marijuana

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Winter X Games are once again in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley.

Officials try to shed light on a lack of childcare in our region.

A major landowner in Aspen is asking elected leaders for an extension for one of his development proposals.

Aspen’s Police Chief reports back from a statewide conference about pot and public safety

And a troubled Carbondale elementary school will need a new principal next year.

Officials in Garfield County get an update on an oil and gas study.

And doctors in Glenwood Springs are lending a hand with radon testing.

Aspen’s mayor heads to Washington.

And we stop by a long running nordic ski area in the Mid Valley.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen Police Chief Richard Pryor started a recent day with his usual stroll into town. “I walked down Main Street today, instead of Hopkins Street, and along the seven hundred block of West Hopkins, I could smell the odor of marijuana plants somewhere in the area.” Chief Pryor chuckles at the thought. A little over a year ago, he would have followed his nose, started knocking on doors and asking questions. But with recreational marijuana legal in Colorado for the last year, Pryor made “a mental note of it, and moved on.” That’s just one of many changes for police departments across the state, and Pryor and other police chiefs recently gathered in Denver to compare notes. Pryor talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about marijuana and public health and safety.

Marci Krivonen

A laboratory that tests retail marijuana is opening in Carbondale. It’s one of just two such Colorado labs west of the Continental Divide. The scientists who run GreenHill Laboratories say they will be testing for potency and they’ll be one of the first to test for contaminants. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Inside Greenhill Laboratories in Carbondale, Lab Owner Hilary Glass motions toward her equipment.

Glass: "These are my incubators. I need about eight more."

Eagle County Sheriff's Office

Another major marijuana grow site has popped up in the Roaring Fork Valley area. Eagle County officials say many plants were found near Cottonwood Pass. About a thousand plants were on private property, located approximately twenty minutes from El Jebel. The land is unincorporated Eagle County, so that sheriff’s office has destroyed the greenery and growing equipment. 

forestcamping.com

The Forest Supervisor for the White River National Forest says he expects to see more marijuana grow sites on national forest land now that pot is legal in Colorado.

Forest Service officials on Wednesday dismantled a large cultivation site near Ruedi Reservoir. It’s illegal to grow marijuana on federal land and there are strict penalties.

Hunters discovered the latest site that contained more than 2600 mature marijuana plants. That’s $6 million to $8 million worth of pot. Scott Fitzwilliams is Forest Supervisor.

Fine Bud: Cannabis Gets Respect(able)

Sep 24, 2014
Blue Sugar Productions

In November, Aspen will play host to a marijuana event organizers are likening to the annual Food and Wine Classic.  In the nine months that recreational marijuana has been legal in Colorado pot has become an industry similar to the wine or spirits industries.  This falls innaugural Cannabis Grand Cru promises to further the mainstreaming of marijuana.  APR's Roger Adams spoke with the event's organizer Anthony Dittmann, CEO of Blue Sugar Productions.

The Colorado Board of Health has voted against setting maximum patient caps for medical marijuana caregivers. The proposed rule would have limited caregivers to just 10 patients. After a tense and at times tearful hearing Tuesday, the board said the change was unnecessary.

Marci Krivonen

On Thursday we told you about how the Aspen-based Valley Marijuana Council is working on educating people about retail pot. Today we’ll explain how the State of Colorado is using tax money from marijuana sales to create an education campaign of its own. The Colorado Department of Public Health is planning to roll out television commercials, radio spots and billboards early next year around how to use marijuana safely.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

Even though snowfall is likely weeks away, law enforcement and businesses in Aspen are gearing up for winter and for tourists trying marijuana. A local marijuana safety group is drawing up a pamphlet it plans to place in hotel rooms throughout the resort. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen explains.

The Aspen Square Condominium Hotel is a short walk from the ski gondola and, from a retail marijuana store. Now that pot’s legal, General Manager Warren Klug says he’s concerned about people smoking in their rooms and staff taking home what guests leave behind.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Parents of students in the Roaring Fork School District may notice a few things are different this year.

Law enforcement officers are aiming to cut down on DUI’s… but there are limits on what they can do.

Colorado says it’s posted next year’s health insurance rates so people can find out whether they’ll be charged more… but it’s near impossible actually find those rates.

Water experts and decision makers are trying to figure out how to fairly divvy up Colorado River water if drought becomes a factor in the future.

And, now that recreational marijuana shops are open in Pitkin County, elected leaders are going over concerns, like accidental overdoses.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

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