Mountain Edition

Good afternoon, and welcome to Mountain Edition.

You’ve probably noticed we’re in our summer pledge drive this week… so today we’re bringing you an update on the latest local news.

Like efforts to restrict drilling on the Thompson Divide… lots of business in the valley this summer... and what we know now about theories on who may have been involved in Nancy Pfister’s death.

Then we’ll hear some of our favorite stories over the last several months… One man says he’s the only Ute tribal member who lives in the Roaring Fork Valley.

And, we chat with a local rabbi considered one of the most inspiring in the country.

We’ll hear about one of the tough issues in the Roaring Fork Valley. Heroin overdoses have claimed several lives this year.

As for the pledge drive, thanks if you’ve already made a gift or renewed your membership. If not...it’s time.

Because nearly half of Aspen Public Radio’s funding comes from listeners like you. Please consider making a pledge, at whatever amount is comfortable.

Call us at 920- 9000 during regular business hours, or give anytime on the interwebs, that’s aspen public radio dot org.

We’ve got lots of good stories for you during this special pledge drive edition of Mountain Edition... starting now.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

It’s been a busy summer in the Roaring Fork Valley so far. For some communities, it’s an important economic boost.

The U.S. Justice Department fines Citigroup for misconduct that helped fuel the recession. We talk to Colorado’s US Attorney, who was part of the investigation.

Colorado names Carbondale a creative district candidate. Turns out, much of the town’s economy is centered around ingenuity.

We’ll head to a shooting range near Basalt, where a group of women are learning to cast...and blast.

And, it’s the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act this year. We’ll introduce you to a group of women who fought to protect the Maroon Bells/Snowmass area.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Today we have a tour of a drilling and fracking site near the Roaring Fork Valley

We’ll hear exactly what goes on there and what it sounds like.

That site and many others in Colorado use infrastructure called injection wells and they’re causing earthquakes in Oklahoma.

Legal marijuana plants and edibles must be tested before they’re sold and just three labs are doing all the testing.

A new brewery in Glenwood Springs debuts a new kind of beer in the Valley – be prepared to pucker up.

And a local favorite tells all about his new book, about hosting the long running Telluride Bluegrass Festival.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Sunday marks an anniversary of a local tragedy. A wildfire near Glenwood Springs 20 years ago, killed fourteen firefighters.

As the cycling world gears up from the Tour de France, the sport is still dusting itself off. We hear from Lance Armstrong who was found guilty of doping.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper was in Aspen this week, discussing two hot topics at the Aspen Ideas Festival - marijuana and fracking.

Another Ideas Fest speaker was Grover Norquist, founder of Americans for Tax Reform.

A natural history documentary screens on PBS next year and this one is unlike any other nature film. We’ll tell you why.

Finally, we’ll take you to Snowmass Village where a giant yoga festival gets underway today.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

This week, Republicans decided who’s going to run against Democratic governor John Hickenlooper this fall.  Bob Beauprez is a former Congressman and wants to put government red tape on ice.

Republicans also chose to keep Representative Scott Tipton as their candidate for the sprawling 3rd Congressional District and we’ll hear from his Democratic opponent, Abel Tapia.

Finally, to get a break from all the politics, we’ll take a tour of Aspen’s Smuggler Mountain and its profitable mining history.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition, right now.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

There were surprising new developments this week in an Aspen murder case. We’ll have the latest.

The Pitkin County Commissioners approve a stop-gap measure to prevent mega events in environmentally sensitive areas. A huge wedding on the back of Aspen mountain prompted the move.

In Aspen Governor Hickenlooper apologizes to law enforcement for mistakes made with the state’s new gun laws.

Several sheriffs in Aspen for a conference are concerned about legal marijuana.

And, employers are figuring out pot and drug policies for workers.

Finally, we check in with newly insured locals who purchased health insurance plans through the state exchange.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

A judge has released hundreds of pages of court documents in the Nancy Pfister case. We’ll have a quick review.

The sheriffs are in town-- for a statewide conference. This is a chance for Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo to show off his work in Aspen.

Officials and local representatives are tackling how to get faster internet access in rural areas.

Aspen wants to get more people to build hotel rooms...

And, Garfield County may have to help pay for some improvements near Glenwood’s Grand Avenue Bridge.

An Aspen nonprofit is heralding the cancelation of a mega dam project in Chile.

And a hydropower plant in southwest Colorado is now officially up and running… we’ll hear what that means for the Aspen.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

High water on the Crystal River has forced the Gunnison County Sheriff’s office to call off a search for a missing kayaker.

Rivers in the Valley are dangerously high. One stretch of the Colorado River is too full to float, so a commercial rafting company changed its route.

A local photographer is back from the Colorado River Delta, where he witnessed the Colorado River reconnect to the sea.

Jimmy Carter and Amory Lovins are a few guests set to speak at this summer’s American Renewable Energy Day in Aspen - we’ll have a preview.

And, more than a dozen new art sculptures were installed on Carbondale’s busy streets this week.

Finally, we’ll take you to Hunter S. Thompson’s old homestead for a cookout hosted by a marijuana advocacy group.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

A neighboring county is grappling with a huge mudslide, west of the Roaring Fork Valley.

It’s so dangerous a search for three missing residents has been called off and another slide could come down.

Construction begins in Carbondale for a decorative new roundabout on highway 133.

We’ll hear different opinions about a federal plan to beef up environmental protection for certain bodies of water.

Some Colorado companies are starting to use the state’s new logo but there have been hiccups for the branding effort.

Finally, we’ll hear from a state representative whose district covers Pitkin County about her busy time at the Statehouse.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition – right now.

Residents in the Roaring Fork Valley have been the target of recent scams. We’ll have the latest.

Will tourists flock to mountain communities this summer? One resort analyst thinks so.

And, fire season is already underway in the Western U.S. Fire officials tell Roaring Fork Valley residents now is the time to get ready.

A former director of the Colorado State Lottery is entering the race for Congress...but, he’ll need more than just a scratch ticket to win the job in Washington.

Aspen Valley Hospital is in the middle of its switch from paper files to electronic patient records.

Finally, Governor Hickenlooper made law a pair of measures this week that tighten rules around marijuana.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Pages