William “Trey” Styler found dead

Aug 6, 2015

Updated (Thursday 8/06/2015 5:40pm): Convicted murderer William “Trey” Styler was found dead in his cell Thursday. Styler was serving a twenty year sentence for killing Aspen native Nancy Pfister. A press release from a public relations firm, sent out Thursday afternoon, announced Styler’s passing, saying the 67-year-old was found hung to death. The Colorado Department of Corrections later confirmed he had died.

Colorado Bureau of Investigation

A suspect arrested for first degree murder and domestic violence in an alleged homicide in Carbondale was taken to jail on Wednesday.

Arturo Navarrete-Portillo was released from a Grand Junction hospital and transported to the Garfield County Jail, where he’s being held without bond. The Carbondale man is charged in the death of his wife, Maria Carminda Portillo-Amaya, who was found with knife wounds in an apartment on February 16th.

Randy Essex / Glenwood Post Independent

   A Carbondale man confessed to killing his wife while he was being airlifted to a hospital in Grand Junction on Monday, according to law enforcement. The Carbondale Police Department issued a press release that says the man was driving a Toyota 4Runner that collided with a semi truck on Highway 133 on Monday morning. While in flight to St. Mary’s in Grand Junction, he “allegedly told the flight crew that he had killed his wife” in an apartment building in Carbondale. Police investigated and discovered a deceased woman with knife wounds.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

All charges have been dropped for Kathy Carpenter. But, the investigation into her possible involvement in the death of Nancy Pfister continues. Carpenter's attorneys plan to show what they call “false information” was used in her arrest.

Elise Thatcher

BREAKING: William Styler pleads guilty in Pitkin County to 2nd degree murder in the Nancy Pfister case.

He's expected to serve 20 years in prison.

Details are expected soon.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

There were surprising new developments this week in an Aspen murder case. We’ll have the latest.

The Pitkin County Commissioners approve a stop-gap measure to prevent mega events in environmentally sensitive areas. A huge wedding on the back of Aspen mountain prompted the move.

In Aspen Governor Hickenlooper apologizes to law enforcement for mistakes made with the state’s new gun laws.

Several sheriffs in Aspen for a conference are concerned about legal marijuana.

And, employers are figuring out pot and drug policies for workers.

Finally, we check in with newly insured locals who purchased health insurance plans through the state exchange.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason, Editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, former editor of and now columnist for the Aspen Times.

This month special taxing districts are holding elections for their boards.  Two are getting a lot of attention because of what happened in their last elections.  Critics are running for seats this time. 

One of those is the Crown Mountain Recreation District. Also facing a shuffle is the Carbondale Fire District.

This week legal wrangling continued over opening files in the Nancy Pfister murder case.

Today we talk with Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon about a squabble in the valley’s environmental activist community.

And, there was more evidence this week that marijuana is getting respectable….The Colorado Symphony Orchestra wants pot smokers to shed the tie-dye and clip on a cumber bun. 

A judge schedules the first major court hearings in the Nancy Pfister murder case. Three people are charged with conspiring to kill the Aspen native.

A new study shows there may be a link between natural gas development and defects that develop in a child before birth.

Has Aspen become too expensive for the middle class? We talk to local residents and young business owners to find out how they’re making it work.

Finally, a local theatrical group - the Hudson Reed Ensemble is already preparing for summer. It’ll bring back a favorite event - Shakespeare in the Park.

Defense attorneys in the Nancy Pfister case are digging through lots of evidence.

Spring snow showers have boosted snowpack to above-average levels and forecasts are calling for high river flows this spring.

A Western Slope lawmaker is proposing Colorado get its own firefighting fleet of airplanes and helicopters.

And, wildfire is on the minds of local officials who are planning ahead after devastating fires in recent years, on the Front Range.

Suicide is getting attention in the Aspen community, after several deaths this winter.

And, we have some fun with what could be the Upper Valley’s first home inspired hybrid.

A long-time local accused of murdering Aspen resident Nancy Pfister was in court on Wednesday. Kathy Carpenter is one of three arrested for the crime.

Voters in Basalt next week will elect three new Town Council members. We hear from business owners about what they want from the elected officials.

Across the nation the number of heroin and opiate overdoses is increasing...and, there’s an uptick in heroin use here in the Roaring Fork Valley.

We talk with two young men who have struggled with heroin addiction...they describe the pain of running out of the drug and the threat of overdose.