natural gas

Marci Krivonen

The Forest Service was met by protesters Tuesday (9/2/15) in a remote area in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. The agency is starting a review of a proposal to drill an exploratory well. But, the group gathered doesn’t want any natural gas drilling. They say the area’s natural environment is too valuable. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s tough to imagine coming up here for anything other than peaceful moments in the great outdoors. But about 40 people Tuesday maneuvered mud-caked roads to protest drilling. Some even slept over.

Elise Thatcher

Construction is underway for a second compressed natural gas station in Glenwood Springs. When finished, the CNG filling stop will be the first in Glenwood that's open to the public.  Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher examines the economics behind natural gas cars and trucks, and who might use such a station.

Thompson Divide Coalition

The Thompson Divide Coalition hopes a successful negotiation with an energy company in Gunnison will set a precedent closer to home. 

The Coalition is working to keep natural gas drilling out of the Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Three companies have undeveloped leases. The second largest, Gunnison Energy, this week agreed to protect the land surface in the Divide through methods like directional drilling. Zane Kessler is with the Coalition.

Roger Adams

The largest natural gas company in Garfield County announced layoffs on Monday. WPX is eliminating 11 of 231 positions at its office in Parachute. Twenty-five employees at the company’s Denver office are also losing their jobs. Company-wide, WPX is laying off 83 people. It operates in three major basins: in New Mexico, North Dakota and Colorado.

Natural Gas drilling in an area near Carbondale known as the Thompson Divide is still a possibility, despite protest from many local residents. The group trying to stop it is hopeful a Forest Service plan, due out later this summer, will prevent future drilling.

Fracking: Is There a Fix to the Fight?

Jun 30, 2014

Fracking: Is There a Fix to the Fight?

Domestic shale gas has transformed the US energy equation, but its development can have unacceptable impacts on air and water quality, while methane emissions from oil and gas development can undo the climate benefit of burning natural gas instead of other fossil fuels. Colorado has led the way with the nation's strongest air pollution standards for oil and gas development, including the first direct regulation of methane. Governor John Hickenlooper and Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp, who worked closely on the breakthrough rules in Colorado, lead a discussion of the way forward for shale gas.

Fred Krupp, John Hickenlooper, Gillian Tett


A new study from the Colorado School of Public Health links natural gas development with certain birth defects. The report, Natural Gas Development and Birth Outcomes, found congenital heart defects were 30 percent more likely in infants born to mothers living close to natural gas development. These defects happen before birth, when the blood vessels near the heart don’t develop normally. Lisa McKenzie is a Research Associate at the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health.

Facebook/Refuel Colorado Fleets

Garfield County is one of nine Colorado counties chosen to participate in a program meant to expand alternative fuels. Refuel Colorado Fleets aims to power more vehicles with fuels like compressed natural gas. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Under the plan, a group of so-called “energy coaches” will connect businesses and government agencies with auto dealers, fuel providers and others in the transportation sector. It's in an effort to create an infrastructure for unconventional fuels.