non profit

Aspen TREE Co-Directors Eden Vardy and River Morgan share their vision for Aspen TREE in the coming years, and discuss the power of thinking positively about environmentalism. The organization has ambitious plans for growth and expansion, which includes a model for up-and-coming farmers. 

Aspen TREE Board Vice President Michael Miracle also contributes. 

Learn more about Aspen TREE, and their upcoming programs, events, and volunteer opportunities at

Aspen TREE Founder and Co-Director Eden Vardy discusses Aspen TREE's signature event, the Farm to Table Community Meal, a free meal served the week of Thanksgiving and made entirely from local ingredients.

Board members Michael Miracle and Jeff Davlyn discuss the importance of Aspen TREE in the community and their role in educating the Valley about local and sustainable food. 

Learn more about Aspen TREE and their events at

Co-Directors River Morgan and Eden Vardy share Aspen TREE's formal and informal programs, which range from Earth Keepers summer day-camp to self-guided tours of the FarmPark, located at Cozy Point Ranch outside of Aspen. Board Vice President Michael Miracle also contributes.

Go to to learn more about Aspen TREE's programs and events. If you are a teacher in the Roaring Fork Valley and would like to schedule a field trip to the FarmPark, contact River Morgan or Eden Vardy for more information at (970) 379-2323.  

Aspen TREE Co-Directors Eden Vardy and River Morgan share the history of the organization and the inspiration behind the work of Aspen TREE. Vardy became inspired after taking an Environmental Literacy class at Aspen High School, which would lead him to pursue his undergraduate and graduate degrees focused on positive environmentalism. 

The organization is located at Cozy Point Ranch, where they operate the FarmPark,. The park includes a greenhouse dome, food garden, alpacas, goats, chickens, rabbits, and more, and is open 365-days a year and open to the public. 

Sloan Shoemaker, Executive Director of Wilderness Workshop, and Will Roush, Conservation Director of Wilderness Workshop, discuss the organization's role in conserving and protecting public lands today and what the future holds. Challenges include overpopulation and climate change, but the Workshop remains optimistic.

Visit for more information and links to events and membership. 

Wilderness Workshop Conservation Director Will Roush outlines the two guiding principles the organization uses to conduct their work in protecting the lands of the White River National Forest and surrounding areas.  Peter Hart, Conservation Analyst and Staff Attorney, also contributes to the conversation.  Roush and Hart discuss the Thompson Divide and the BLM's decision to cancel 25 oil and gas leases on the Divide, and the organization's work in forest restoration and water. 

Rebecca Mirsky is the Development Director at Wilderness Workshop, and oversees the Artist in Wilderness Program. The program invites artists for a one-week residency in the Aspen area, where they create art inspired by the places that Wilderness Workshop is working to protect. Mirsky also discusses the organization's summer guided hike series, local lecture series, and volunteer opportunities.

In 1967 three local Aspen women, Joy Caudill, Dottie Fox, and Connie Harvey, came together with two goals: 1. to designate the Hunter-Fryingpan  Wilderness and Collegiate Peaks areas as wilderness, and 2. to double the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness area. 

Mike Pritchard, Executive Director of the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association, RFMBA, shares the organization's recent success with trail systems in New Castle, and the organization's future goals and trail projects. Adam Cornely of New Castle Trails and Charlie Eckart, RFMBA Board President, also contribute. 

Learn more about RFMBA and how you can get involved at, and visit the New Castle Trails Facebook page for volunteer opportunities and trail updates. 

Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association (RFMBA) Board Chair Charlie Eckart and Executive Director Mike Pritchard explain how the organization balances their mission of maintaining and creating the best mountain bike trails in the Roaring Fork Valley with multiple local, state, and federal regulatory agencies, as well as concerns of sustainability and equitable access. Also, Jim Neu of Glenwood Springs started the Two Rivers Trails, who shares his work with RFMBA to advocate for the construction of new trails in the Glenwood Springs area. 

Roaring Fork Mountain Association, or RFMBA, Executive Director Mike Pritchard shares the organization's trail projects and how they benefit more than just mountain bikers in the Roaring Fork Valley. RFMBA Board Vice President, Todd Fugate, also contributes.

Visit to learn more about the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association and past, current , and future trail building projects.

Mike Pritchard is the Executive Director of the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association, or RFMBA . He discusses the organization's beginnings with chairman of the RFMBA board, Charlie Eckart. 

RFMBA is a member of the International Mountain Bicycling Association, or IMBA. To learn more about RFMBA and what it means to be a member of the IMBA, visit

Spellbinders Executive Director Catherine Scales Johnson discusses the impact of Spellbinders on the students in schools throughout the Roaring Fork Valley and the future of the volunteer-based organization. 5th grade Aspen Middle School teacher Amy Gray also contributes to the importance of the program in the classroom. 

Roaring Fork Valley Spellbinders Chapter leader, Annie Sinton, also can be heard telling the story of a dog and a mountain lion from a storytelling event at Explore Booksellers in July 2016. 

Amy Gray is a 5th grade teacher at Aspen Middle School. Every month, her class is visited by a special guest, Adelaide Waters, a volunteer storyteller for Spellbinders. Waters has a new story to tell the students every month, and as Gray explains, the students are captured by each and every story. 

Gray shares the importance of oral storytelling for her students and the value the program brings to her classroom. Spellbinders Executive Director, Catherine Scales Johnson also contributes. 

Catherine Scales-Johnson is the Executive Director of Spellbinders, an organization that is best known for its in-school storytelling program. Told by volunteers, the stories span from folk tales and personal stories to historical fiction. All volunteers must go through a 14-hour training and continue to have regular meetings with other volunteers.

Volunteer teller, Adelaide Waters, shares her personal experience with Spellbinders and the inspiration for her own stories. 

Germaine Dietsch founded Spellbinders in Denver in the 1980's. She discusses the organization's history , her personal inspirations, and how the organization grew from an idea to 18 national and international chapters today.  

Learn more about Spellbinders and how you can get involved at   

Kelly Murphy is the Executive Director of the Aspen Historical Society. She discusses the challenges and marks of success of the organization, as well as the future. Nina Gabianelli, vice president of education and programs, also contributes. 

To learn more about the Aspen Historical Society, visit, and to visit the archives, go to

  Tony Vagneur is a past president and current board member of the Aspen Historical Society. He shares the history of the historical society and the organization's role in Aspen's evolution. Executive Director Kelly Murphy also contributes. 

Learn more about the Aspen Historical Society at and access the archives at

If you visit the town of Marble this summer, tucked into the woods right off the main road, you'll notice a flurry of marble dust, the roar of power tools, and over 60 artists working on marble sculptures. This is the MARBLE/Marble Symposium and Joshua Weiner, a professional sculptor, has been actively involved for 23 years.

Weiner discusses the culture of the organization and the easygoing nature of the symposiums, and how his time spent with the symposium has transformed his own work. 

Mark Browning is a sculptor and an active member of the MARBLE/Marble Symposium summer crew. He runs the kitchen during the summer workshops, but finds lots of time to interact with the symposium participants and work on his own sculptures. 

Browning shares his personal experiences with the symposium and the importance of the organization for the town of Marble and greater art communities. More information about the symposiums can be found at