non profit

Survivors of child abuse come to River Bridge after an allegation has been made, there's suspicion, or maybe they come years after an incident. The colorful little building is designed to make kids feels safe and give them the opportunity to share their stories and experiences. Kerry Ach is the Community Outreach Coordinator and Forensic Interviewer at River Bridge. She describes her job (both the rewards and the challenges).  

Blythe Chapman, the Executive Director of River Bridge Regional Center, discusses the center's history and importance in the Roaring Fork Valley Today. The nationally-accredited child advocacy center helps survivors of child abuse in Pitkin, Eagle, Garfield, and Rio Blanco counties. It is the only child advocacy center on the I-70 corridor between Denver and Grand  Junction. 

Jeff Leahy is the head of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He talks about CRMS's longtime outdoor and classroom-based curriculum, the future of the education landscape, and how CRMS is looking to improve their programs. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org

Kayo Ogilby is the Science Department Chair at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He shares his teaching style, and talks about the culture of the school. CRMS is unique in many ways, but the athletic teams really stand out. The school has a large soccer and cross-country ski team, but there's also a telemark skiing and climbing team (among many other mountain sport clubs). 

Visit www.crms.org to learn more about the school's academic curriculum, outdoor programs, and sports teams. 

Molly Dorais is the Director of Admissions at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. She discusses the school's unique curriculum and programs, and the types of students who attend CRMS. The school is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization, so tuition goes directly into the school's programs, faculty, and facilities. While the price tag might shock prospective students and their families, Dorais discusses CRMS's generous financial aid program. 

To learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, visit www.crms.org

The Colorado Rocky Mountain School's 60-year history is chock-full of interesting characters - people who believe work in the classroom should be coupled with physical work and outdoor education. The end result: a curious, knowledgeable, and well-rounded 18-year old. Mark Clark started his journey with CRMS in 1979. He is a CRMS faculty member and splits his time between Carbondale and Wyoming. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org.   

Logan Hood is the Executive Director of RESPONSE. She says sexual assault and domestic violence is far  too common - even in the Roaring Fork Valley. Hood discusses issues in the valley, challenges the organization faces, and how communities can rally together for no-tolerance. 

Learn more about RESPONSE at www.ResponseHelps.org, or call the 24-hour support and crisis hotline at 925-SAFE. 

This week, the 2014 National Sheepdog Finals will be held on the Strang Ranch above Carbondale. Bridget Strang is the event's host and talks about the history of the event, what to expect, and how you can attend. All proceeds from ticket sales will go to Aspen Valley Land Trust. Martha Cochran is the Executive Director of the land trust and shares why this partnership was a natural fit.

Huts for Vets is a new non-profit, founded in January 2013. The organization lead two programs last summer, introducing 15 veterans to the serenity and calm of the wilderness - almost all of whom said the experience changed their life. Paul Anderson is the Executive Director of Huts for Vets and shares about the mission and programs of the non-profit organization. Dr. Jerry Alpern is a psychologist and a member of the board, he shares about the value of Huts for Vets. 

Learn more about Huts for Vets and Huts for Vets programs on their website: www.hutsforvets.org

Aspen Valley Foundation

The non-profit Aspen Valley Foundation is all but obsolete except for one remaining initiative: a retirement facility in Basalt. The Foundation this year, ran out of money for the grants it traditionally awards local non profits. But, members of the Foundation’s board say they’re committed to moving forward a so-called continuing care retirement community. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

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