Oil & Gas Business

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The smells of legalization permeate up and down the valley, and the odor of marijuana has some people plugging their noses and complaining to city officials.

An investigation is brewing around a nonprofit in Glenwood and whether funds were misappropriated.

Meanwhile, there’s more debate on oil and gas drilling in the valley.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The Obama administration is requiring oil and gas companies to disclose what’s in their fracking fluid. How is that going to shake out in Garfield County?

Did a town hall meeting hosted by this station on the controversial and confusing charter amendment known as “Keep Aspen Aspen” shed light on the issue enough that voters are convinced one way or the other?

Meanwhile, down in Carbondale a woman who used to co-own a NBA basketball team is suing the IRS for $21 million.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Elected leaders in Aspen choose a brewery - slash - small business incubator to fill the city-owned Old Power House.

Unstable snow on local ski slopes prompts the Aspen Skiing Company to temporarily close terrain.

A professional cross country ski racer is home from the World Championships. Aspen’s Simi Hamilton looks back on his season.

There won’t be a sentence for a fatal highway 133 crash for another month.

We hear from the head of Colorado’s largest oil and gas organization about why she’s leaving her post.

The executive director of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, Tisha Schuller, recently announced that she's leaving the state's largest trade organization for the energy industry.

In a statement released by COGA, Schuller said it was a "wild ride" and that she was honored to have represented the state's oil industry. While remaining in her position until the end of May, Schuller sat down to talk about the future of the industry and why she decided to leave her position.

Trying to get more information on the health impact of oil and gas drilling is a topic that lawmakers will soon be taking up at the statehouse. It comes after the Governor's Oil and Gas Task Force finished their work and issued several health related recommendations.

"I get a little bit concerned and annoyed when people try to use health as the basis of what they don't like about oil and gas," said Dr. Larry Wolk the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment.

He said he understands the concern, but worries the state doesn't have enough hard data.

Good afternoon, welcome to Mountain Edition.

Bus drivers in the Roaring Fork Valley vote to unionize.

Aspen law enforcement is violating a no-idling ordinance.

A Carbondale man accused of murdering his wife appears in court.

An Aspen teenager pleads guilty to pot-related charges.

A major employer in Garfield County announces layoffs.

High profile fatalities in Garfield County highlight a problem with domestic violence.

A more detailed avalanche report is out, about the accident that killed a long time Aspen local.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Aspen lost another longtime local in avalanche. And this week marks the first anniversary of the murder of Aspen native Nancy Pfister.

Municipal elections are coming up in Glenwood Springs and Aspen. This year, it’s all mail-in. But in Aspen, you can still vote in a traditional way at two polling places.

Meanwhile, Aspen City Council is countering a citizen ballot measure on development limitations. Will it just confuse voters more?

Speakers With Differing Views at Glenwood Springs Energy Forum

Feb 23, 2015
energyxxi.org

  The topic of energy can be a hot potato, whether the conversation is about how to regulate it or what kinds are best for the environment. The Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association is dipping a toe into those waters with what’s called the Energy Forum on Thursday. The event has two main speakers, who represent a range of opinions in the Roaring Fork Valley. Christopher Guith is with the US Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C, and Energy Engineer Mike Ogburn is with the Carbondale nonprofit Clean Energy Economy for the Region, or CLEER. Reporter Elise Thatcher talks with them both.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Warm temperatures are boosting river levels and disappointing skiers. We’ll tell you what’s ahead in the forecast.

Low oil and gas prices are good for consumers but tough on companies drilling in Western Colorado.

Despite an oil and gas slowdown, a new analysis shows hundreds of spills are still being reported.

Aspen residents are gathering signatures to get a measure on the ballot that would require voter-approval of some development projects.

Elise Thatcher

Oil and gas companies were responsible for over seven hundred spills in Colorado last year.  There were 128 in Garfield County-- making up nearly twenty percent of accidents statewide.  That’s according to a review of public data by the Denver nonprofit, Center for Western Priorities.   A spokesman for the agency that oversees oil and gas development in Colorado, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, is "neither endorsing nor challenging" the report.  APR’s Elise Thatcher talks with CWP's Policy Director Greg Zimmerman, who points out the spills released more than a million gallons of oil and other chemicals into the environment.

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