Pan and Fork

basaltchamber.org

Basalt’s Town Council will meet Tuesday to discuss whether to purchase a key parcel of land downtown. The meeting comes after the land parcel’s owner suggested the sale last week. 

The Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation owns 2.3 acres on what’s called the “Pan and Fork” site. The land has been eyed for development by the group Lowe Enterprises, which wants to build a hotel and condominiums. Council members had concerns with that proposal. Now, there’s an opportunity to purchase the parcel.

ourtownplanning.org

Later this month Basalt Town Council will consider “next steps” for downtown redevelopment. In 2014, a community-wide planning process began for 13 public and private acres. In the fall, a committee began culling the community’s ideas and eventually came up with recommendations on how they envision downtown. This year, the ideas may begin to take shape. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Mike Scanlon, Basalt’s Town Manager.

The Town is eyeing future redevelopment on the Pan and Fork, Lion’s Park and Clark’s Market properties.

Marci Krivonen

A committee charged with brainstorming redevelopment ideas for downtown Basalt presented their findings on Thursday evening. The Downtown Area Advisory Committee met with Town Council, the Planning and Zoning committee and scores of interested citizens. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The volunteer committee has been meeting regularly since October and pouring over ideas from the community and a map of downtown Basalt. Basalt is considering redeveloping several key parcels, including some riverfront acreage.

Marci Krivonen

The committee that’s reviewing ideas for downtown redevelopment in Basalt received a letter from local businesses last week. The business owners are concerned they’re not being included in the process.

The letter is signed by five property owners with land in the heart of downtown. The group charged with visioning redevelopment, the Downtown Area Advisory Committee, has included the private parcels in their consideration.

Marci Krivonen

If you’ve driven through downtown Basalt recently, it’s hard to miss the mess of trees, electrical boxes and garbage covering a central stretch of land. It’s the site of the old Pan and Fork Mobile Home park, where more than 300 people used to live. The Town of Basalt helped those residents relocate and now it’s focusing on redeveloping the five acres. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen walked through the area with Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

www.ourtownplanning.org

The process of moving families out of Basalt’s Pan and Fork mobile home park is nearly complete. Just one family remains in the flood-prone neighborhood which will eventually become a public park. 

Since August, officials from the Town of Basalt have been working with families in the 38 homes, to help them find new housing. The Town purchased part of the trailer park in 2011 so it could redevelop it. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says more than 380 people were living in the park.

Marci Krivonen

Elected leaders in the Town of Basalt voted last night to explore alternative options for families being relocated from a trailer park. The Town has been offering cash assistance. But, a group called Workers for Justice and Diversity in Basalt says it’s not enough to pay Basalt’s high rent prices. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

Some Basalt families are angry about being removed from their homes. The relocation is part of an effort to get residents out of a flood plain and restore the Roaring Fork River. Now, frustrated residents are meeting directly with town officials. The Town of Basalt is holding a meeting next week with a committee called Workers for Justice and Diversity in Basalt. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

As mobile homes make way for a public park in Basalt, some say a non profit organization has broken promises about how it would help residents. More than 200 people in the flood-prone Pan and Fork Mobile Home park now have to move or get ready to, as riverfront work starts there. One resident Adriana Torres, says years ago, the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation, or CDC talked about relocating the residents.

Marci Krivonen

The removal of more than three dozen trailers from a mobile home park in Basalt is continuing ahead of work to restore the Roaring Fork River’s shores. The trailer homes sit in a floodplain and the local government is working on getting residents out of danger. They plan to replace the trailers with a public park. So far, a handful of trailers have been hauled away. Still, many residents remain. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, they’re hoping to find inexpensive housing.

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