Pitkin County

Pitkin County

Pitkin County residents will be registering their cars and voting in a different location soon.

The Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder’s office is planning to move into three different locations next year so the annex building it currently occupies can be remodeled. County staff on Wednesday will ask the commissioners to approve three leases that combined will cost the county nearly $19,000 a month in rent. That’s almost a half a million dollars over the 2 years the departments will be in their temporary offices. That doesn’t factor in altering the new spaces. Janice Vos Caudill is Pitkin County’s clerk and recorder.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. Angry businesses have settled out of court over a large-scale power outage.

Garfield County officials are cheering a wildlife decision by the federal government.

Snowmass Village puts off another decision about Base Village.

A controversial mid valley marijuana facility has a chance to keep growing.

Grassroots TV

A marijuana grow facility near Basalt will continue to operate. The Pitkin County Commissioners Wednesday (9/24) did not cancel a pair of licenses for High Valley Farms.

Facebook/Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County’s Open Space and Trails Department is planning to put up signs about moose on some of its properties after several reports of sightings. 

It’s the first time in recent memory moose have been spotted at places like the North Star Nature Preserve, along the Hunter Creek trail and near the Roaring Fork River in the midvalley.

Education materials on how to behave around moose are prolific in areas like the Maroon Bells. Now, Assistant Director of Pitkin County Open Space Gary Tennenbaum says his department will add them to their properties.

High Valley Farms

One week ahead of a decision on whether to renew a license for a marijuana grow operation, the Pitkin County commissioners visited High Valley Farms.


A new Colorado law gives elected officials across the state a pay hike. On Tuesday (9/15) the Pitkin County Commissioners discussed Senate Bill 288 and how it may impact their paychecks. 

The legislation was crafted as a way to tackle low pay for state executive officers, such as Colorado’s Secretary of State. With an annual salary of just over $68,000, that position’s pay ranks low nationally.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Brian Turner

The field of candidates to fill a vacant judge post that serves the Roaring Fork Valley, has been narrowed down. 


The Pitkin County Commissioners are unhappy with what they’ve seen so far in a BLM plan for existing oil and gas leases on the Thompson Divide. They’re crafting a letter to the agency. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Pitkin County gets an early look at the BLM’s preliminary draft Environmental Impact Statement because it’s a cooperating agency. A public version will be released in November. It’ll decide what to do with more than two dozen undeveloped oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Pitkin County wants the leases canceled.

Creative Commons/Flickr/ICMA Photos

Pitkin County is looking to share 911 dispatchers with the Town of Vail to deal with a shortage of workers. 

Pitkin County Undersheriff Ron Ryan told county commissioners Wednesday the dispatch center is in “crisis mode.” 911 call centers typically experience difficulty in hiring, but for Aspen it’s especially tough because of its small staff. Just eight people are fully trained. That's about half of a full staff.

Bruce Gordon/Ecoflight

There are differing opinions about whether a Gold King mine disaster could happen in Aspen’s backyard. The spill, accidentally triggered by an Environmental Protection Agency team, let loose 3 million gallons of contaminated water into the Animas River in southwest Colorado. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explored whether such a catastrophe could happen here.

The spill turned the Animas bright orange and halted river access in an area known for rafting.