Pitkin County

A significant chunk of workers in Aspen have high blood pressure.That’s according to data from health fairs last fall, coordinated by the five biggest employers in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley. They’re part of the Valley Health Alliance, a new nonprofit aimed at improving health in the Upper Valley.

Facebook/Rachel Richards

In June the Pitkin County Commissioners sent a resolution to Colorado’s congressional delegation, decrying a national effort to transfer federal lands to state ownership. Advocates say it would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and BLM. Commissioner Rachel Richards told Marci Krivonen the effort would spell trouble for Pitkin County.

Rachel Richards is a Pitkin County Commissioner. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. In future weeks, we’ll air the other side of the argument.

Elise Thatcher

To replace the aging Grand Avenue Bridge in Glenwood Springs, the Colorado Department of Transportation needs more money. On Thursday (7/16) CDOT will request funding from the Elected Officials Transportation Committee. 

Marci Krivonen

The Castle Creek valley just outside of Aspen is becoming increasingly popular to recreationists like hikers and cyclists. Pitkin County and the White River National Forest are taking comments from the public on how to best manage the area. 

Creative Commons/Flickr/Zdenko Zivkovic

The number of low-income Medicaid patients accessing care in area emergency rooms is on the rise. The increase - seen at Aspen Valley and Valley View Hospitals - follows a national trend in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

In 2014 the amount of business Aspen Valley Hospital did for Medicaid patients was triple the number in 2013. Hospital officials attribute the rise to Colorado expanding its Medicaid program.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

A Snowmass Town councilman faces a felony charge after allegedly trashing a jail cell.

Aspenites will probably vote on a proposed affordable lodge.

A judge considers whether the Aspen Skiing Company is at fault for a mudslide that damaged a home.

We take a look at diversity in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community.

We also get a tour of an innovative marijuana grow facility in the Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County is fighting a national effort to transfer federal public lands to states. The county plans to send a resolution to congressional representatives in Washington DC. 

One group advocating for state control of federal public lands is the American Lands Council. It argues state control would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

Marci Krivonen

A Midvalley marijuana grow facility is walking a fine line with Pitkin County. After much discussion, the county commissioners agreed Tuesday to give High Valley Farms more time to tackle its odor problem.

Neighbors and business owners in Holland Hills say their quality of life and property values are sliding because of the smell. The 25,000 square foot greenhouse facility grows plants for the retail pot shop Silverpeak in Aspen.

Kent Schuler lives in Holland Hills. He says he’s had it with what he calls a “stench.”

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County elected leaders are sending a letter to Colorado’s congressional delegation, urging them to support an effort that would preserve the Thompson Divide. One county staffer calls it “the most promising proposal to date.”