Pitkin County

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

A Snowmass Town councilman faces a felony charge after allegedly trashing a jail cell.

Aspenites will probably vote on a proposed affordable lodge.

A judge considers whether the Aspen Skiing Company is at fault for a mudslide that damaged a home.

We take a look at diversity in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community.

We also get a tour of an innovative marijuana grow facility in the Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County is fighting a national effort to transfer federal public lands to states. The county plans to send a resolution to congressional representatives in Washington DC. 

One group advocating for state control of federal public lands is the American Lands Council. It argues state control would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

Marci Krivonen

A Midvalley marijuana grow facility is walking a fine line with Pitkin County. After much discussion, the county commissioners agreed Tuesday to give High Valley Farms more time to tackle its odor problem.

Neighbors and business owners in Holland Hills say their quality of life and property values are sliding because of the smell. The 25,000 square foot greenhouse facility grows plants for the retail pot shop Silverpeak in Aspen.

Kent Schuler lives in Holland Hills. He says he’s had it with what he calls a “stench.”

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County elected leaders are sending a letter to Colorado’s congressional delegation, urging them to support an effort that would preserve the Thompson Divide. One county staffer calls it “the most promising proposal to date.”

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Oregon Dept. of Transportation

Pitkin county staff will explore using rooftops and other government property to install solar panels. County commissioners this week approved a funding request for a feasibility study. 

The county will spend between $15,000 and $25,000 to locate beneficial sites for solar and find out how much electricity could be generated. Right now, the county consumes 1.3 megawatt hours per year and it’s not offset by any significant renewable efforts. County Engineer G.R. Fielding says now is a good time to pursue solar.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County is taking public comments on a draft plan for managing the North Star Nature Preserve, east of Aspen. On Monday night, an open house will be held, where people can learn more about the wetlands and meadows. 

You drive by the North Star Nature Preserve on your way toward Independence Pass from Aspen. It’s a 285-acre open space parcel with deer, elk, black bears and the one of the highest elevation Great Blue Heron rookeries in the state.

Facebook/State Rep. Millie Hamner

State Representative Millie Hamner is back home in Summit County after a busy legislative session. The former school superintendent sponsored several education measures including one that will reduce testing. Hamner’s district includes Pitkin County. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Millie Hamner represents House District 61 at the Statehouse, which includes Pitkin County.

New building planned behind courthouse

May 13, 2015

  Pitkin County plans to expand its office space with a new building behind the courthouse. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason sat down with County Manager Jon Peacock and undersheriff Ron Ryan about the project.

That was Jon Peacock and Ron Ryan, Pitkin County’s manager and undersheriff. They talked with Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

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