The Snowmass Club has announced it will submit a plan to town council requesting a redevelopment of its 217 acre property in Snowmass Village. The plan includes new residential and employee housing and a re-positioning of a portion of the Club’s land.

If approved, some land would be donated to the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, so the organization can expand their campus and increase parking. Nancy Wilhelms is Executive Director of Anderson Ranch. She says much needed student housing would be added.

Marci Krivonen

Basalt Town Council met behind closed doors last night to discuss a possible land purchase and go over a new “roadmap” for downtown development. 

The Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation is urging council to consider buying land it owns downtown. The non profit’s 2.3 acres is prime real estate along Two Rivers Road. Board President Michael McVoy says the corporation would like to retrieve its investment. The land was purchased as a partnership with the town in 2011.

Basalt’s Town Council will meet Tuesday to discuss whether to purchase a key parcel of land downtown. The meeting comes after the land parcel’s owner suggested the sale last week. 

The Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation owns 2.3 acres on what’s called the “Pan and Fork” site. The land has been eyed for development by the group Lowe Enterprises, which wants to build a hotel and condominiums. Council members had concerns with that proposal. Now, there’s an opportunity to purchase the parcel.

Sofas replace bananas at former Basalt grocery store

Apr 30, 2015
Marci Krivonen

Beds and couches have replaced groceries in a key downtown building in Basalt. The Habitat for Humanity Restore opened its doors last Wednesday in the old Clark’s Market space. 

The non profit furniture and donation center has received a positive response from the community, according to managers. The store opened fully stocked with donations from a high end lodge in Beaver Creek. A percentage of sales go to Habitat for Humanity’s home building fund.

The 18,000 square foot space sat empty for months before Habitat moved in. Jeff Sirbu is with the local affiliate.

Glenwood City Council race: Kathryn Trauger

Mar 26, 2015

Kathryn Trauger is running for an at-large seat on Glenwood Springs City Council. The long-time resident has made her opinions known on her blog. Now she wants a voice on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A few years ago Trauger says she became discouraged with some things happening in city government.

"I was seeing a lot of misinformation and some things that were not communicated correctly, so I decided to start writing a blog."

Glenwood City Council race: Steve Davis

Mar 23, 2015
Marci Krivonen

All this week Aspen Public Radio will be introducing you to the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Two spots are open on the seven-member board. Ballots will be counted April 7th. It’s a critical election for the city. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

REPORTER: "Transportation issues are what make this election so critical for the City of Glenwood. What comes after the Grand Avenue Bridge replacement is one issue the candidates will have to deal with.”

Restore to fill empty storefront in downtown Basalt

Feb 24, 2015
Facebook/Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley

The non profit filling a central building in downtown Basalt wants to open in early April. The local Habitat for Humanity chapter will open a Restore in the former Clark’s Market space that’s empty. 

The agreement between the building’s owner and Habitat for Humanity marks a transition for downtown. Businesses there have struggled to get business. This latest announcement may bring in some vitality.

Later this month Basalt Town Council will consider “next steps” for downtown redevelopment. In 2014, a community-wide planning process began for 13 public and private acres. In the fall, a committee began culling the community’s ideas and eventually came up with recommendations on how they envision downtown. This year, the ideas may begin to take shape. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Mike Scanlon, Basalt’s Town Manager.

The Town is eyeing future redevelopment on the Pan and Fork, Lion’s Park and Clark’s Market properties.

Marci Krivonen

A committee charged with brainstorming redevelopment ideas for downtown Basalt presented their findings on Thursday evening. The Downtown Area Advisory Committee met with Town Council, the Planning and Zoning committee and scores of interested citizens. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The volunteer committee has been meeting regularly since October and pouring over ideas from the community and a map of downtown Basalt. Basalt is considering redeveloping several key parcels, including some riverfront acreage.

Marci Krivonen

A development group is now involved in the discussions around redeveloping downtown Basalt.

Lowe Enterprises has partnered with a landowner involved in the redevelopment process. Lowe built The Gant hotel in Aspen. They’re partnering with the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation that owns 2.3 acres along Two Rivers Road, where a trailer park once stood. Town government owns adjacent land that sits in the floodplain and borders the Roaring Fork River.

Tensions were high at a packed Town Council meeting in Basalt Tuesday night, where the discussion was about downtown redevelopment. A group of people criticized council and the mayor, accusing them of hijacking the months-long community process of deciding what belongs on key parcels.  Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Tonight (Tues 9/23) the Basalt Town Council will decide whether to approve members of a special board that will help make decisions on downtown development. The committee would, according to the Town Manager, “put more meat” on redevelopment ideas. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Marci Krivonen

If you’ve driven through downtown Basalt recently, it’s hard to miss the mess of trees, electrical boxes and garbage covering a central stretch of land. It’s the site of the old Pan and Fork Mobile Home park, where more than 300 people used to live. The Town of Basalt helped those residents relocate and now it’s focusing on redeveloping the five acres. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen walked through the area with Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

Basalt's Pan And Fork Mobile Home Park Nearly Empty

Mar 26, 2014

The process of moving families out of Basalt’s Pan and Fork mobile home park is nearly complete. Just one family remains in the flood-prone neighborhood which will eventually become a public park. 

Since August, officials from the Town of Basalt have been working with families in the 38 homes, to help them find new housing. The Town purchased part of the trailer park in 2011 so it could redevelop it. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says more than 380 people were living in the park.

The Town of Basalt’s halfway through its unconventional urban planning process. In February, Town officials invited residents to participate in what they’re calling the “Our Town” process, where they lay out a map of downtown and ask people what they’d like to see there. So far, more than 300 people have offered up ideas. They’re zeroing in on a 12 acre chunk of public-private land that runs from Old Pond Park to Basalt Grocery and the Aspenalt Lodge. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Basalt Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

Marci Krivonen

The Town of Basalt held a groundbreaking ceremony yesterday for a major river project set to get underway Monday.

The so-called Pan and Fork project will replace a trailer park with a public park and an improved floodway and riverbank. Construction starts in earnest on Monday. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says he wanted to get the word out now.