Roaring Fork Valley

Amy Gray is a 5th grade teacher at Aspen Middle School. Every month, her class is visited by a special guest, Adelaide Waters, a volunteer storyteller for Spellbinders. Waters has a new story to tell the students every month, and as Gray explains, the students are captured by each and every story. 

Gray shares the importance of oral storytelling for her students and the value the program brings to her classroom. Spellbinders Executive Director, Catherine Scales Johnson also contributes. 

Catherine Scales-Johnson is the Executive Director of Spellbinders, an organization that is best known for its in-school storytelling program. Told by volunteers, the stories span from folk tales and personal stories to historical fiction. All volunteers must go through a 14-hour training and continue to have regular meetings with other volunteers.

Volunteer teller, Adelaide Waters, shares her personal experience with Spellbinders and the inspiration for her own stories. 

Germaine Dietsch founded Spellbinders in Denver in the 1980's. She discusses the organization's history , her personal inspirations, and how the organization grew from an idea to 18 national and international chapters today.  

Learn more about Spellbinders and how you can get involved at www.spellbinders.org.   

Andrew Vick is the President of the Board of Directors for the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership. He's proud of where the organization is going, but there are challenges. Vick shares his vision for the future of the organization, including the building of a physical space.

Learn more about Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership, and find the application for the class of 2017 at www.rfleadership.org.   

Derek Hanrahan is an alumnus of Roaring Fork Leadership and serves on the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership's Board of Directors. He talks about his experience in Roaring Fork Leadership and the impact the program has had on his life both professionally and personally. 

The application for the class of 2017 is now available online at www.rfleadership.org

The Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership is best known for their year-long program, Roaring Fork Leadership, where individuals go through 10 months of classes and training with the end goal of becoming better leaders and more engaged citizens. Andrea Palm-Porter is the Executive Director of the organization. 

Learn more about the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership at www.rfleadership.org, or find the application for the class of 2017. 

John Sarpa is a long-time local who is a graduate of  the Roaring Fork Leadership program and then served as the President of the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership. Often confused for the name of the organization, Roaring Fork Leadership is the 9-month long program that trains professionals in the Roaring Fork Valley to become better leaders, thinkers, and activists in their communities. 

Sarpa shares the history of the organization and its importance today. 

Buddy Program Executive Director, David Houggy, talks about the organization and his vision for the future. The Buddy Program has been expanding its services in Carbondale, and are anticipating more growth in the coming years. 

Buddy Program Board Member and former Big Buddy, Peter Waanders, is joined by his little buddy of 10 years, Egbert Ospina. Waanders and Ospina met almost 14 years ago when Ospina was in 3rd grade. Now studying at American University and set to graduate in spring 2016, Ospina credits Waanders with his success and confidence. The two say their involvement as buddies with the Buddy Program's Community Mentoring Program not only changed their daily lives, but gave them a lifelong friendship.

Lindsay Lofaro is the Assistant Director of the Buddy Program. She discusses the organization's various mentoring programs, including the popular Community Mentoring Program, where adults are paired with little buddies, and the newest program, LEAD, or Leadership through Exploration, Action, and Discovery. 

Sole Lowe is the Buddy Program's Community Program Director and is based out of the Third Street Center offices in Carbondale. She joined the Buddy Program team in 2002 and shares the history and evolution of the mentoring non-profit over the years. 

More information about the Buddy Program and how you can get involved at www.BuddyProgram.org

Marci Krivonen

Dry February weather melted snow in the high country, but snowpack levels are still substantial. A healthy level of snow up high is important for everyone down low, particularly farmers and ranchers. A crew of snow surveyors and high-tech systems are already sending readings about snowmelt. Marci Krivonen explains.

It’s a calm and sunny February day at 8700 feet above sea level. Snow surveyor Derrick Wyle plunges a long metal tube into deep snow on McClure Pass, south of Carbondale.

Sallie Bernard is the Founder and Board President of Ascendigo, and says that the need for providing services to individuals and their families  on the autism spectrum is growing. Bernard is joined by Ascendigo's Executive Director, Hugh Zuker, and Ascendigo's Adult Program Manager, Carly Knauf. 

Learn more about Ascendigo and their programs in the Roaring Fork Valley at www.Ascendigo.org

 Ascendigo Executive Director, Hugh Zuker, discusses the organization's programs and the importance of the organization's work in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Ascendigo is best known for its summer camp.  Through individualized instruction, participants do a host of outdoor activities including hiking, kayaking, water skiing, and rock climbing. Ascendigo also offers an adult enrichment program and a winter sports program.

Ascendigo has been operating out of the Roaring Fork Valley since 2004. Founded by Sallie Bernard, who now serves as the Board President, the autism services organization has grown from a summer sports camp to a nationally known group that offers a range of outdoor sports programs. 

Bernard is joined by Ascendigo's Clinical Coordinator, Sami Henry, M. Ed., BCBA, to discuss the organization's history and programs.  

Group looks to grow new farmers in Roaring Fork Valley

Oct 26, 2015
Marci Krivonen

There’s growing momentum around producing local food in the Roaring Fork Valley. The new group Roaring Fork Beginning Farmers and Ranchers sprung up earlier this year. It targets mostly young people and it’s meant to help new farmers with hurdles like expensive land. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

English in Action Executive Director Lara Beaulieu discusses the challenges facing the organization, as well as her goals for the future. English in Action has a waiting list with almost 100 individuals waiting for tutors - the organization will host a fall volunteer tutor drive in hopes of recruiting almost 80 new tutors.

Learn more about the fall recruitment HERE, and find out more information about English in Action at www.EnglishinAction.org.   

Julie Goldstein is the Board Chair of English in Action. She joined the organization in 2009 when she became a volunteer tutor. She shares her personal experiences in education and as a tutor, and examines the changing trends of immigrant communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Visit www.EnglishinAction.org to learn more about how you can become a volunteer tutor. 

In the 1980's, an increasing number of immigrants - predominantly from Mexico and Central America - became a vital part of the Roaring Fork Valley. Some of these new immigrants struggled to learn English and in some cases, cultural divides developed.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Brian Turner

The field of candidates to fill a vacant judge post that serves the Roaring Fork Valley, has been narrowed down. 

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