Barbara Platts

Digital Content Manager

Barbara moved to Aspen more than three years ago after graduating from Emerson College in Boston with a journalism degree. She grew up in Boulder, making frequent trips with her family to Aspen, no matter the season. Her time on the east coast was gratifying, but despite her attempts to ignore it, the mountains were calling her and she had to go back.

Since moving to this mountain haven, Barbara has worked with Ecoe Marketing and O Communications, which taught her a great deal about public relations, branding and advertising. In 2014, she took a job as the associate editor and marketing coordinator for Aspen Magazine, where she helped manage editorial content as well as sales materials, advertorials and events.

For the past two years, Barbara has branded herself as an expert on millennial living in Aspen, producing a weekly column called Aspen Untucked for the Aspen Times Weekly. Last year, the Colorado Press Association acknowledged her beat with six awards in the Colorado Press Better Newspaper Contest.

In her spare time, Barbara enjoys getting out on the mountain, be it on skis or in hiking boots. She’s always ready to say yes to any adventure in the outdoors and can typically be found cross country skiing on the golf course with her adorable one year old puppy, Cassius.

Aspen has felt like home to Barbara since she first learned how to ski on the slopes of Buttermilk at age four. She cares about the community very much and is a board member at the Aspen Historical Society, Marshall Direct Fund and Action for Afghan Women, all nonprofit organizations based in Aspen. She’s thrilled to start working with Aspen Public Radio, a nonprofit that provides such an invaluable service to our community.

We wrapped up our Summer Pledge Drive on Wednesday, July 26, thanks to support from listeners and members like you!

Aspen Public Radio was recognized by Charity Navigator with the highest rating possible for a non-profit: 4 Stars. We are one of only 13 public media companies in the country with that rating.

Alycin Bektesh

This spring, Aspen Public Radio was awarded two Colorado Broadcasters Association awards for news coverage.

One was for the feature on Conundrum Hot Springs and the other was for the series on Pitkin County Landfill.

Ron Cogswell/Flickr

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, told lawmakers in a statement on Monday that he "did not collude... with any foreign government."

 We brought NPR journalists and hosts to you and local schools. Ira Flatow, the host of Science Friday, visited and talked with students at Roaring Fork High School. NPR’s Jackie Northam visited with the journalism class at Aspen High School.

Architect of the Capitol

Over the past few months, we have brought you live coverage of major historic events happening in Washington. These include the Senate intelligence committee hearings with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and former FBI director James Comey.

President Trump maintains that millions of people voted illegally in the 2016 election. Was Vladimir Putin one of them? If so, beyond influencing the American election, is Russia working to undermine the entire Western liberal democratic order? If so, what can and should we do about it?

On Tuesday, Aug. 22, we are bringing you NPR’s former bureau chief of Moscow Corey Flintoff to discuss the resurgence of Russia in the time of President Donald Trump.

We bring you numerous special broadcasts such as more than 23 hours of Ideas Festival lectures and discussion, the McCloskey Speaker Series, which started last week and continues all summer, the Security Forum this week and classical music concerts and opera all summer long.

Near the end of the winter season this year, we hired our first-ever full time producer Christin Kay.

Leading up to the Aspen Institute’s Spotlight Health conference at the Aspen Ideas Festival, Aspen Public Radio created and produced a show every Tuesday in order to give our listeners unparalleled access to important information on the cutting edge of health and healthcare in the world.

This spring, before the Aspen City Council election, Aspen Public Radio hosted a series of Candidate Chats. Reporter Alycin Bektesh interviewed all five candidates running for City Council and two candidates running for mayor. 

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer on Tuesday. An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father." Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting, which former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner also attended in June 2016.

Matt Ferro

Fareed Zakaria, the host of CNN’s Global Public Square (GPS) and columnist for the Washington Post, was at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week. He talked about the roots and future of populism.

Walter Isaacson is fascinated by innovators — the kinds of geniuses whose ideas have transformed industry, science, and society. Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, and Benjamin Franklin each grabbed his attention in ways that allow us, as readers, to discover the depth and breadth of their brilliant thinking and creative sensibilities.

“When they go low, we go high,” Michelle Obama famously said during the epically nasty 2016 presidential campaign. But that strategy didn’t win Democrats the White House or Congress. What are the issues that Democrats must capitalize on to win back needed ground in the midterms?

  The Aspen Ideas Festival's signature event hosts an audience of 2,000 in the Benedict Music Tent. Big thinkers and doers will engage serious ideas about their work, our world, and the future.

Matt Ferro

The kind of work we do — and the way we do it — has changed a lot over the past 50 years. The modern-day employee is fast, flexible, and mobile. More and more, companies are finding they must enhance their physical environment in order to create the kind of cultural environment that attracts next-generation talent and gives them a competitive edge. 

The notion of applying principles of democracy to governance has been around for centuries, increasingly popular as citizens across the globe discover the value of participatory government and the power that it invests in them.

Stay updated on the happenings of the Food and Wine Classic in Aspen.

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