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Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

Sculpture with a side of sawdust in 'The Power of Tools'

Imagine the tools you typically find in an art class. Pens, pencils, brushes... small, safe items. For John Bozza’s “Power of Tools” class, the first items students need are eye protection and a face mask. They learn to use electric saws and drills, and to find art in the things that they can’t control.

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Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

The City of Aspen has agreed to move water rights for storage out of Castle and Maroon Creeks.

 

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board is working on a new public art piece to honor Snowmass’ 50th anniversary.

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

Imagine the tools you typically find in an art class.  Pens, pencils, brushes... small, safe items.  For John Bozza’s “Power of Tools” class, the first items students need are eye protection and a face mask. They learn to use electric saws and drills, and to find art in the things that they can’t control.

This week, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Christin Kay bring you the week’s news from the Roaring Fork Valley.

 

Roger Adams

If an oil and gas company pays too much in tax, it can get a refund, called an “abatement.” Garfield County might see one or two of these each year, and it’s the libraries, hospitals and school districts, among others, who refund the money.

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

The community is invited to help create a mosaic picnic table for the Latino Folk Art Garden on the Rio Grande Trail in Carbondale.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

After nine deaths in the Elk Mountain backcountry last summer, Mountain Rescue Aspen wanted change. The organization has teamed up with the Pitkin County Sheriff’s office and the U.S. Forest Service on a new campaign aimed at helping prepare people for backcountry adventures.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Earlier this month, Aspen city council declared a "stage one" drought. This means the city is asking residents to voluntarily cut back on irrigation and water consumption and is requiring that city government do the same.

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

A new exhibit at Anderson Ranch invites visitors to interact with photography, sculpture and even puppets.

This is Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio, our six-part series partnering with the Aspen Ideas Festival and the Spotlight Health Conference.

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Spotlight Health

APR's 2018 Artistic Partner

Introducing Jody Guralnick

APR's Community Calendar

Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

2017 Program Guide

State News

Colorado lawmakers wrapped up their annual legislative session this week. Even though the session was often overshadowed by sexual harassment allegations and the expulsion of former Rep. Steve Lebsock, lawmakers and the governor said it was one of the most successful sessions in history

After a dramatic and tearful day in early March, lawmakers voted out one of their own. Democratic Rep. Steve Lebsock was the first lawmaker expelled in 103 years after allegations of sexual harassment, intimidation and retaliation from five women, were found to be credible.

But that wasn't the end.

Thousands of Colorado teachers spent two days rallying at the state Capitol for higher salaries and more money for schools. They highlighted long-standing funding problems and potential changes to the state’s public employee pension program currently being debated by the legislature.

Statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland spoke with Brian Eason of The Associated Press and Ed Sealover with the Denver Business Journal about the rallies.

Senate leaders expect to meet soon to address next steps in possible punishments for Sen. Randy Baumgardner. Three independent investigations by two agencies have found allegations of sexual harassment against him at the Capitol credible.

Democrats are pushing for swift action. Baumgardner, a Hot Sulphur Springs Republican, survived an expulsion vote on April 2. That vote hinged on the findings of just one of the three investigations, which concluded that Baumgardner more likely than not grabbed and slapped a former legislative aide’s buttocks.  The two other investigations had not been finalized at the time of that vote. They were only released to the accusers last week. We made them fully available to the public on April 24 with the accusers’ consent.

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