Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The smells of legalization permeate up and down the valley, and the odor of marijuana has some people plugging their noses and complaining to city officials.

An investigation is brewing around a nonprofit in Glenwood and whether funds were misappropriated.

Meanwhile, there’s more debate on oil and gas drilling in the valley.

A bill to raise the salaries of Colorado's elected officials was introduced in the Senate Thursday.  The proposal had been discussed for months, but people working on the measure said state lawmakers in both parties wanted to make sure there were enough votes for it to clear the legislature before allowing an introduction. This late in the session, a legislative leader must approve a bill before it can be introduced.

A measure to eliminate immunity for public schools for school shootings, death, sexual assaults and other series injuries that happen to students on school grounds cleared the House Judiciary Committee Thursday. It passed on a vote of 10-3.

Currently public schools are not liable. Legislative leaders in both parties are sponsoring the change, spurred in part by the 2013 death of Claire Davis. She attended Arapahoe High School in Littleton when a fellow student shot and killed her before turning the gun on himself.

Elise Thatcher

Two young residents of the Roaring Fork Valley are pitching in with the effort to help repair after the massive earthquake in Nepal. Basalt residents Tashi Jackson and Karuna Owens are starting a fundraising competition.

Carolyn Sackariason

There are four days left to vote in the Aspen municipal election where residents are deciding on a charter amendment, a mayor and two council members. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

As of Thursday evening, more than 1,300 Aspen residents had cast their ballots in this all-mail election. Judging from previous city elections, more than half have already voted. The average turnout is between 2,000 and 2,500 voters. Aspen City Clerk Linda Manning predicts turnout will be on the high end.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

A tanker truck crashed on Capitol Creek Road in Old Snowmass Thursday afternoon, spilling fuel onto the landscape. 

The accident happened shortly before 1 o’clock in a rural area across from what’s known as the “llama and alpaca ranch.” One vehicle was involved: the fuel truck. Photos show it upside down on a grassy area, possibly resting on a ditch.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Today we have a special election show featuring the candidates running for office in Aspen.

Seven people are vying for two open seats on city council. Two are running for the mayor’s post.

Among other questions, we asked the candidates about a controversial ballot question called Referendum One. If passed, it would amend the City Charter to require a public vote on development projects with exceptions for height, size, parking or affordable housing.

http://www.weymouth.ma.us/

Questions have been raised about Aspen’s affordable housing authority. Aspen Public Radio spoke with legal experts about whether it could be vulnerable to lawsuits. They say probably not, contradicting APCHA’s former director.

Marci Krivonen

Beds and couches have replaced groceries in a key downtown building in Basalt. The Habitat for Humanity Restore opened its doors last Wednesday in the old Clark’s Market space. 

The non profit furniture and donation center has received a positive response from the community, according to managers. The store opened fully stocked with donations from a high end lodge in Beaver Creek. A percentage of sales go to Habitat for Humanity’s home building fund.

The 18,000 square foot space sat empty for months before Habitat moved in. Jeff Sirbu is with the local affiliate.

Pitkin County

The radio system used by public safety agencies in the Roaring Fork Valley is encountering problems and Pitkin County is considering a multi-million dollar fix. 

Law enforcement and fire agencies have complained of interference, signal distortion and the inability to communicate with regional and state agencies that use a different system. For example, Pitkin County’s snow plow drivers can’t communicate with the Colorado Department of Transportation. And, the bus system’s radios don’t communicate with the Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office.

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