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Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Uphilling economy ascends

Diversifying the economy is one of the top 10 goals for the City of Aspen. Mayor Steve Skadron sees the increased popularity of “uphilling” – both done in the winter on skins and snowshoes, and in the summer on bicycles – as a way to add new local industry, without requiring new development.

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  Tonight may be the public’s only chance to weigh in in person about a proposed chain store ordinance in Aspen.

Big changes are happening over at Theatre Aspen.

The theater’s executive artistic director Paige Price is leaving in the spring. She’s going to be the new producing artistic director for the Philadelphia Theatre Company.

 

After a decade of leadership, Price was foundational in launching Aspen Theatre Fest, the company’s professional Apprentice Program. She also helped establish the Hurst Theatre in Rio Grande Park.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

A researcher with the U.S. Forest Service will speak this week about the sociology and psychology of fire management.

Valley teens use poetry to tackle tough topics

Feb 21, 2017
Claire Woodcock/Aspen Public Radio News

On Friday night, dozens of area high school students took part in Aspen Words’ 4th annual Youth Poetry Slam in Carbondale.

After two weeks of work, students throughout the Roaring Fork Valley gave an auditorium full of adults a clue into their secret lives. There were 24 students who spoke with honest authority on topics that most teenagers keep to themselves. Topics like confidence and anxiety; puberty and relationships; drugs and alcohol; depression and suicide.

“The truth is, when I talk to people, I can’t breathe,” one student proclaimed.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County has hired Janine Barth as its new veterans services officer.

A Colorado newspaper is fighting claims that it peddles fake news stories. The publisher of Grand Junction’s Daily Sentinel is accusing a state lawmaker of defamation and threatening a lawsuit. If filed, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not.

The dispute began with an opinion column in the newspaper supporting a bill that would give journalists and others greater access to public records. Sen. Ray Scott, a Republican of Grand Junction who serves as assistant majority leader in the Senate, postponed the hearing and vote.

Colorado is roughly a third of the way through the four-month long legislative session. John Frank, a reporter for The Denver Post, and Peter Marcus with ColoradoPolitics.com sat down with statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland to take stock of the big issues this session.

Show your support by making a pledge today!

Aspen Public Radio’s morning host and operations manager Morgan T. Neely explained why he’s so passionate about supporting public media.

First Draft - Sarah Manguso

Feb 20, 2017

Sarah Manguso is the author of seven books including 300 Arguments, a genre-defying work of nonfiction; Ongoingness, a meditation on motherhood and time; The Guardians, an investigation of friendship and suicide; The Two Kinds of Decay, a memoir of her experience with a chronic autoimmune disease, and Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape, a collection of very short stories.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Immigrants who are new to Roaring Fork Valley schools often come from warm, tropical countries. A partnership between Basalt High School and the Roaring Fork Conservancy aims to help students understand their new environment.

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A Colorado newspaper is fighting claims that it peddles fake news stories. The publisher of Grand Junction’s Daily Sentinel is accusing a state lawmaker of defamation and threatening a lawsuit. If filed, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not.

The dispute began with an opinion column in the newspaper supporting a bill that would give journalists and others greater access to public records. Sen. Ray Scott, a Republican of Grand Junction who serves as assistant majority leader in the Senate, postponed the hearing and vote.

Colorado is roughly a third of the way through the four-month long legislative session. John Frank, a reporter for The Denver Post, and Peter Marcus with ColoradoPolitics.com sat down with statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland to take stock of the big issues this session.

In the last decade, Democrats have attempted to repeal Colorado's death penalty four times. Their latest attempt on Feb. 15 was amid contentious debate. Senate Minority Leader Lucia Guzman (D-Denver)  was behind the effort. She knew the odds were against her, but even before the hearing, she said she wanted to raise awareness to the moral and social issues surrounding the death penalty.

“There are a lot of people willing and wanting to learn more and more about the problems with it, the challenges of it, and we need to keep that message going,” she said. “I don’t think we’ll lose the battle, because the battle is long-term.”

Lawmakers serving on the Senate Judiciary Committee will hear a measure to repeal Colorado's death penalty Wednesday. 

CrossCurrents is Aspen Public Radio's locally-produced public/cultural affairs program.
Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.