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Courtesy of the Wilderness Workshop

Wilderness Workshop leadership changes; goals remain

Last week, the Wilderness Workshop announced that executive director Sloan Shoemaker was stepping down after 21 years with the conservation organization. Will Roush, who has been with Wilderness Workshop since 2009, will take over the position in September. They both spoke with Aspen Public Radio environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy about the organization and the transition.

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Roger Adams

If an oil and gas company pays too much in tax, it can get a refund, called an “abatement.” Garfield County might see one or two of these each year, and it’s the libraries, hospitals and school districts, among others, who refund the money.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

On Tuesday, Aspen City Council will discuss how to spend the Wheeler Opera House’s surplus revenue. The extra funds come partially from a voter-approved real estate transfer tax (RETT).

Courtesy of Bluegreen Aspen

On Tuesday, Pitkin County commissioners and Basalt town council members will hear an update on plans to upgrade the areas surrounding the whitewater park.

Non-Profit in the Spotlight: Aspen Film, Week 4

19 hours ago

Aspen Film seeks to enlighten, enrich, educate, and entertain through film. Founded in 1979 by Ellen Hunt, Aspen Film has been creating unique experiences for all audiences. Susan Wrubel, Executive Director, and Regna Jones, Director of Operations and Education detail what Aspen Film means to them. 

Canine Outreach Care & Rescue seeks to ensure that as many dogs as possible avoid suffering and injury. Dedicated to helping needy families pay for life threatening and emergency veterinary expenses, Canine Outreach Care & Rescue provides funds to pay for veterinary care. Co-founders Sarah Simms and Sandro Torres explain where they see their non-profit in the future, and the importance of awareness in our community. 

Elise Thatcher

A group hoping to change the date of Aspen’s municipal elections is holding a public meeting Tuesday evening.

Courtesy of the Wilderness Workshop

Last week, the Wilderness Workshop announced that executive director Sloan Shoemaker was stepping down after 21 years with the conservation organization. Will Roush, who has been with Wilderness Workshop since 2009, will take over the position in September. They both spoke with Aspen Public Radio environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy about the organization and the transition.

Courtesy of CLEER

Ed Mazria founded the organization Architecture 2030, with the goal that all new buildings will be carbon-neutral by 2030. Last week, he spoke at a symposium in Carbondale that was hosted by local energy efficiency organizations.

This week, a judge in Glenwood Springs decided there’s enough evidence to try the couple accused of stealing more than $1 million from the ranch they managed for more than three decades. In Aspen, the interested parties seem to agree on where a new Lift 1 on Aspen Mountain should go and some of the arts events coming up this summer will focus on social issues, like the refugee crisis.

Hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme bring you highlights of the week in news in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

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Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

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State News

Colorado lawmakers wrapped up their annual legislative session this week. Even though the session was often overshadowed by sexual harassment allegations and the expulsion of former Rep. Steve Lebsock, lawmakers and the governor said it was one of the most successful sessions in history

After a dramatic and tearful day in early March, lawmakers voted out one of their own. Democratic Rep. Steve Lebsock was the first lawmaker expelled in 103 years after allegations of sexual harassment, intimidation and retaliation from five women, were found to be credible.

But that wasn't the end.

Thousands of Colorado teachers spent two days rallying at the state Capitol for higher salaries and more money for schools. They highlighted long-standing funding problems and potential changes to the state’s public employee pension program currently being debated by the legislature.

Statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland spoke with Brian Eason of The Associated Press and Ed Sealover with the Denver Business Journal about the rallies.

Senate leaders expect to meet soon to address next steps in possible punishments for Sen. Randy Baumgardner. Three independent investigations by two agencies have found allegations of sexual harassment against him at the Capitol credible.

Democrats are pushing for swift action. Baumgardner, a Hot Sulphur Springs Republican, survived an expulsion vote on April 2. That vote hinged on the findings of just one of the three investigations, which concluded that Baumgardner more likely than not grabbed and slapped a former legislative aide’s buttocks.  The two other investigations had not been finalized at the time of that vote. They were only released to the accusers last week. We made them fully available to the public on April 24 with the accusers’ consent.

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