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Marci Krivonen

A Conversation With The New Owners Of Aspen's Explore Booksellers

The new owners of Aspen’s Explore Booksellers say they bought the property and business because they want to promote new ideas. They also have a history of visiting Aspen and the book store. The $5 million sale closed earlier this month. The new buyer is a group of investors connected to the Public Interest Network. The Network trains activists and supports non profits. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Wendy Wendlandt, a spokesperson for the group of buyers.
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Your Evening News - January 30th, 2015

Jan 30, 2015

AVSC Ski Coach Charged with Child Sexual Assault

One of the alpine ski coaches at the Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club has been arrested. Bill Montage is facing multiple counts of sexual assault on a child by one in a position of trust and aggravated incest. He was arrested yesterday. AVSC says the charges are not related to any minors at the club or in the Aspen area

Welcome to Valley Roundup. A review of the week's news with local writers and editors.

It's the end of an era, Aspen lost an icon in Mary Eshbaugh Hayes.

A group of citizens is one step closer to stripping power from the Aspen City Council. Meanwhile, city council goes on the defense.

Does Aspen really need more affordable lodge rooms? How much is too much?

More development in the midvalley has attracted the attention of many.

The X Games are over... and so is the hangover.

And the Aspen Institute looks to clear up its conflicts.

Your Morning News - January 30th, 2015

Jan 30, 2015

Garfield County to Online Auction Surplus

Garfield County hopes to make some extra cash from surplus equipment like cars or furniturde. The County is in its first round of an online auction for no-longer needed items. Chief Procurement Officer Jamaica Watts explains that Eagle County and other comparable governments are already using the service.

“The public can go on and register, they can put in bids, they can put in proxy bids. We can actually watch it in real time and know what’s going on. It’s kind of like eBay.”

Garfield County can also make sure the price doesn’t go below what the items are valued at. Officials believe this will be more affordable, effective and transparent than the previous method of storing items for long periods of time, and selling at a regular auction.

Setting it up online is technically free, but does require staff time. Buyers also pay an additional 10% of the price to the County. Garfield County is in the middle of its first auction. Watts says the response has been bigger than expected, so far, with multiple bids for several vehicles.

Your Evening News - January 29th, 2015

Jan 29, 2015

Frisch Seeks Re-Election to Aspen Council

Adam Frisch announced yesterday that he plans to run for re-election this spring for a city council seat. Frisch, who is 47, first ran for the four-year term in 2009. He lost that election but won in 2011, garnering more than 45 percent of the vote. Nominating petitions, which require 25 signatures for a candidate to make the ballot, are available beginning Tuesday. Former housing director Tom McCabe also has announced his candidacy for a council seat. Current mayor Steve Skadron and former councilman Torre have said they plan to run for the two-year term. The election is May 5.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Warm temperatures are boosting river levels and disappointing skiers. We’ll tell you what’s ahead in the forecast.

Low oil and gas prices are good for consumers but tough on companies drilling in Western Colorado.

Despite an oil and gas slowdown, a new analysis shows hundreds of spills are still being reported.

Aspen residents are gathering signatures to get a measure on the ballot that would require voter-approval of some development projects.

Your Morning News - January 29th, 2015

Jan 29, 2015

Petition to Control Aspen Development Gaining Signers

A group of Aspen residents gathered at a private home last night to sign a petition about controlling development in town. If it gets enough signatures approved, the proposal would go on the May ballot. It would require voter approval on any new development that doesn’t follow the land use code. Participant Doug Wilson explained why he believes it’s a good idea to keep exceptions to a minimum.

“In the late 1960’s and early 1970’s we worked really hard to come up with the building code that we have today, and it’s made the town retain so much of it’s delicious nature and I’d like to maintain that in the future.”

Wilson is one of a small army of people gathering signatures around town to support the ballot measure. As of last night, they had about five hundred. Bert Myrin worked with about 10 people to put together the proposal. While hosting last night’s event, he said preventing exceptions would level the playing field for developers and residents.

“It’ll create a less divisive community, because everyone will know what the expectations are for the size of the box and the impact it’s going to have on the neighborhood.”

If it’s up to voters to focus on exceptions, Myrin believes that allow City Council to focus on other important issues.

Organizers hope to submit a thousand signatures next Tuesday. Election officials require about three hundred to put a measure on the ballot.

In response to the proposal, Aspen’s City Council is looking at whether to change the land use code before the election. Mayor Steve Skadron said in a heated discussion Monday that he opposes having voters decide what development is appropriate in town.

Marci Krivonen

The new owners of Aspen’s Explore Booksellers say they bought the property and business because they want to promote new ideas. They also have a history of visiting Aspen and the book store. The $5 million sale closed earlier this month.

The new buyer is a group of investors connected to the Public Interest Network. The Network trains activists and supports non profits. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Wendy Wendlandt, a spokesperson for the group of buyers.

Your Evening News - January 28th, 2015

Jan 28, 2015

CMC Holds Local Associates Level Tuition to Zero Increase

Tuition for locals will be the same at Colorado Mountain College this academic year. The board of trustees approved a zero increase on associate-degree-level courses for those who live in the district. Those who are in-state but out of district will be an extra $6.50 per credit hour at the associates-degree level while residents of Chaffee, Grand and Jackson Counties will pay $6 extra per credit hour. The biggest increase comes for those paying out-of-state tuition, who will see a $56 per credit hour increase. A news release from CMC says the school remains one of the most affordable in the state. At the same time, the board of trustees are expected to work over the next few months on comprehensive and strategic plans to improve student access and achievement through changes to the school’s financial aid programs.

Today on CrossCurrents, the five final candidates who are applying for the old Aspen Art Museum Space – the Powerhouse.

Guests are:

Paul Kienast of The Gathering Place

Jackie Francis of The Aspen Science Center

Duncan Clauss of Aspen Brewing Company

Angie Callen of The Red Brick Center for the Arts

John Masters of Grassroots TV

By the look of things outside one might think it’s April. Above-average temperatures and a dearth of snowfall have made this January one for the record books. Aspen Weather.Net’s Cory Gates explains what’s happening and what the future forecast is showing. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

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