KAJX

Local

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Changing faces and roles in new Thunder River production

Corey Simpson became the executive artistic director of Carbondale’s Thunder River Theatre Company this past summer. Since then he’s had to wear many hats. The group is producing their first play of the season, ‘Jekyll and Hyde’.
Read More
Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

SkiCo grants available for environmental projects

Colorado’s Republican Party Chairman said Donald Trump’s views on immigration are evolving, and he thinks the Republican nominee has so far made a strong law and order case on the issue. 

Aspen Public Radio News

For the first time in about 15 years, the Aspen-area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife may live in the Aspen area.

Grassroots TV

The Basalt Town council approved a pair of public land ballot measures after debating the specific language of the questions late into the evening Tuesday night.

Question 2A asks voters to approve a purchase of property along the Roaring Fork River currently owned by the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.

Question 2B will ask voters if the town can take on debt to make that purchase.

Ross Daniels

The Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority board will hear an update regarding a lawsuit against Burlingame resident Lee Mulcahy during their meeting today.

Mulcahy said he will attend the board meeting even though the discussion of the case will be held in closed session. The lawsuit against Mulcahy surrounds his residential and employment status. To live in his Burlingame home he needs to live and work full time in Pitkin County. Mulcahy said he doesn’t know if he will have a chance to speak today, and he doesn’t feel like he has had a chance to make his case.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Cyclists and runners along the Rio Grande Trail are seeing a different kind of wildlife this month. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority has hired a herd of goats to eat weeds along the path from Glenwood Springs to Emma.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Don “Slim” Waechtler founded Slim’s Taxidermy in Glenwood Springs in 1981. In his house, he has what he calls his man cave. It has some of the essentials, like a pool table and flat screen TV, but the decorations are a little more nontraditional. You’ll find the heads of moose, elk and bighorn sheep, as well as a full-sized grizzly bear in the corner.

Courtesy of mybicycleroutes.com

The investigation into the death of 49-year-old Longmont resident Matthew Barz, who was found Monday on McClure Pass, has shown that he died of trauma from an accidental fall.

Today marks the start of the fall schedule for the Roaring Fork Valley Transportation Authority. This means that local valley bus services will reduce in frequency and will not run as late at night and on weekends.

Hubbard Cave outside of Glenwood has been closed to humans since 2010, and officials with the White River National Forest are proposing keeping it this way for the next three years. The move is an effort to prevent White Nose Syndrome, which has killed more than 6 million bats in the eastern United States.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Off season hits Aspen in full force beginning today and the traffic delays and closings are here to prove it.

Pages

Sign up!

The news you want to read

Sent to your inbox every Friday

Testimonials

Arts & Culture

Curated - Sept 19.

Today on Curated, we speak with Joe Seo from the film "Spa Night". We go to Ruggerfest, and profile the executive director of The Art Base.
Read More
Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

State News

Tracy Olson/Flickr

Despite moderate growth in Colorado, non-partisan state legislative economists say the risk of a recession is rising here and across the nation. 

 

For the nearly half million people in Colorado who buy health insurance on the individual market, prices are increasing drastically this next year. 

 Supporters of a ballot question that would make it harder to change Colorado’s constitution have raised close to $3 million.

Colorado has one of the highest rates of opioid abuse in the country, and state and federal officials are asking Congress for more money to try to expand public awareness and hire more healthcare workers.