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Schwartz and Tipton face off in debate at Club 20

Former state Sen. Gail Schwartz, a Democrat who used to live in Snowmass Village, is challenging Republican Rep. Scott Tipton of Cortez in the race for Colorado’s Third Congressional District.
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Author Luis Alberto Urrea  has been called a “border writer” - penning novels and nonfiction works cataloging stories of immigration from Mexico to the United States.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

 

Officials with Pitkin County Open Space and Trails are asking for public input on recent changes at North Star Nature Preserve.

Courtesy photo

The 5Point adventure film festival is bringing their movies outside next Thursday in Carbondale.

 

“Road from Karakol”, which premiered at the 5Point Film Festival in 2013, is being shown.

 

The event features some of the highlights from the nonprofit’s four events in Minnesota, North Carolina, Washington state and here in Carbondale.

 This week on Cross Currents is the second part of the conversation with Weston Boyles of Rios to Rivers, a local non profit for cultural and environmental education.

Colorado’s Republican Party Chairman said Donald Trump’s views on immigration are evolving, and he thinks the Republican nominee has so far made a strong law and order case on the issue. 

Aspen Public Radio News

For the first time in about 15 years, the Aspen-area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife may live in the Aspen area.

Grassroots TV

The Basalt Town council approved a pair of public land ballot measures after debating the specific language of the questions late into the evening Tuesday night.

Question 2A asks voters to approve a purchase of property along the Roaring Fork River currently owned by the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.

Question 2B will ask voters if the town can take on debt to make that purchase.

Ross Daniels

The Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority board will hear an update regarding a lawsuit against Burlingame resident Lee Mulcahy during their meeting today.

Mulcahy said he will attend the board meeting even though the discussion of the case will be held in closed session. The lawsuit against Mulcahy surrounds his residential and employment status. To live in his Burlingame home he needs to live and work full time in Pitkin County. Mulcahy said he doesn’t know if he will have a chance to speak today, and he doesn’t feel like he has had a chance to make his case.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Cyclists and runners along the Rio Grande Trail are seeing a different kind of wildlife this month. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority has hired a herd of goats to eat weeds along the path from Glenwood Springs to Emma.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Don “Slim” Waechtler founded Slim’s Taxidermy in Glenwood Springs in 1981. In his house, he has what he calls his man cave. It has some of the essentials, like a pool table and flat screen TV, but the decorations are a little more nontraditional. You’ll find the heads of moose, elk and bighorn sheep, as well as a full-sized grizzly bear in the corner.

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Arts & Culture

Curated - Sept 19.

Today on Curated, we speak with Joe Seo from the film "Spa Night". We go to Ruggerfest, and profile the executive director of The Art Base.
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Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.

State News

Several dead voters are casting ballots in Colorado, according to a recent report from CBS 4 in Denver.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

 Not surprisingly, reaction to the first U.S. presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton largely depends on party affiliation.

Colorado is among a handful of states where voters will decide if the minimum wage should be increased. If approved, Colorado’s wage would go up each year until it reaches $12 an hour by 2020.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

Despite moderate growth in Colorado, non-partisan state legislative economists say the risk of a recession is rising here and across the nation.