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The current superintendent of schools for the Roaring Fork School District will stay on board. The decision comes after contention in the community.

Since the recession, Basalt has gained back low-paying jobs. A report details a tough scenario for home ownership.

Dozens of people went before Aspen City Council this week, weighing in on their favorite proposal to occupy the former Aspen Art Museum.

Tension remains between animal advocates and the new owners of Krabloonik Dog Sledding in Snowmass Village.

Roger Adams

After three months of meetings, the Roaring Fork School District has finalized superintendent contracts. Superintendent Diana Sirko will stay on for two more years, as will Assistant Superintendent Rob Stein. Then, Stein will become Superintendent for the three years after that. He’s also Chief Academic Officer. The plan, first proposed in December, galvanized parents who preferred one over the other. 

Flickr/hmclaird

Elected officials in Basalt heard results Tuesday from a study done on affordable housing. A Denver-based research group looked over wages, housing costs and job growth and delivered mostly negative findings. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Suzanne Wheeler-DelPiccolo is principal of Basalt Elementary School. She says finding affordable housing is a constant challenge for her staff of teachers.

"When you hire new people, as a principal, I’ve helped people look for apartments and find places to live because it’s that challenging," she says.

Elise Thatcher

The new owners for Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding are working out the details for their lease with the local government. The business is on Snowmass Village town property. Local animal advocates want to make sure there are specific requirements in the lease for treating the dogs well, like making sure they’re off tether more often. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher took a look at the issue and has this story.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

The City of Aspen is putting more financial safeguards in place. The move comes after an audit and Tuesday’s City Council meeting. Council wants a closer eye on money, and finances, handled by city staff. A review of what happened during a recent parking scam revealed a number of things. One was the Finance Department turned off a notification system that might have alerted everyone to the parking scam.  Another was City officials couldn’t find a copy of the former parking meter contract until this week. Employees found it after digging through a Truscott storage area.

Gilman Halsted is the Criminal Justice reporter in Madison. He covers the courts and the prison system also writes and produces general assignment stories for the daily state newscasts.

Gilman began his career in journalism late in life. He spent ten years as a social worker and then English teacher in Bangladesh, Washington DC, India and Wisconsin before landing his first job as a Public Radio reporter in Kenosha in 1988. He worked for three years as the news director at a Community College Station in Panama City, Florida, then for six years as a Wisconsin Public Radio regional bureau reporter in Wausau. He has been working in Madison since the summer of 2000.

aspenfilm.org

The non profit Aspen Film announced Wednesday its co-directors are leaving. After 20 years at the helm, married couple Laura Thielen and George Eldred are stepping down. 

Thielen and Eldred have been part of Aspen Film for more than half of the non-profit’s existence. It formed in 1979 to educate and entertain through film. Each season it holds major movie events. Thielen says she and Eldred have worked hard to bring Aspen Film to where it is today: financially healthy and well-regarded.

Today on CrossCurrents - Annie Denver and Karmen Dopslaff on John Denver's Aspenglow Fund, which has been quietly supporting environmental and educational causes in the Roaring Fork Valley and around the world.

http://www.rmi.org/winter_2014_esj_rmi_in_brief_john_denver_aspenglow

Also, Aspen Public Radio is pleased to announce the receipt of a grant from The John Denver Aspenglow Fund at the Aspen Community Foundation to support news coverage, outreach, and education on the environment.

aspensciencecenter.org

There should be a decision next week about who can move into Aspen's Old Power House. Aspen City Council heard comments from more than forty people at a meeting last night. Council is considering a handful of proposals. The Old Power House was formerly home to the Aspen Art Museum, essentially rent free. After a lengthy hearing last night, Council decided to select a new occupant next week.

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