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Barbershop
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Does It Matter That 'Hero' Charles Ramsey Has A Criminal Past?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer and culture critic Jimi Izrael, with us in Washington, D.C.

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Politics
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Like 'Lazarus,' Mark Sanford Returns To Office

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, even for devoted Christians reading every word of the bible may be a once in a lifetime challenge. In a minute, we'll hear from a man who decided to copy the entire book by hand. And he tells us he's not even particularly religious. We'll think you'll be intrigued by what he has to say in a few minutes.

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The Salt
9:49 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Sago, An Ancient Chinese Starch, Endures In Asian Cooking

Pearls made from sago starch are common ingredients in Asian desserts and savories.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:14 pm

Long before rice became the mainstay of Asia, prehistoric people in China turned to sago palm for starch.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Fri May 10, 2013

'Monkeemobile' Creator Dean Jeffries Dies

Hey, hey: The Monkeemobile, one of Dean Jeffries best-known creations.
Steve Marcus Reuters/Landov

Dean Jeffries, the car customizer who created the "Monkeemobile" for The Monkees TV show, "Black Beauty" for The Green Hornet and who painted two famous words on actor James Dean's Porsche 550 Spyder, died last weekend at his Hollywood home. He was 80. A son says Jeffries died in his sleep.

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NPR Story
9:22 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Microexpressions: More Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:23 am

David Matsumoto, a psychology professor at San Francisco State University, trains national security officials and police officers to recognize "microexpressions"--fleeting, split-second flashes of emotion across someone's face. Matsumoto says those subtle cues may reveal how an interview subject is feeling, helping officials to hone their line of questioning.

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