KAJX

Christin Kay

Programming and Content Producer

Christin Kay is passionate about the rich variety of stories, ideas and experiences in the Roaring Fork Valley. She has been a devotee of public radio for her whole life. Born in Denver, she attended Kansas State University as an undergraduate and Regis University for her masters degree in Education, Learning and Teaching. She was in the classroom for 14 years as an English teacher, working to help her students explore deep connections to important ideas and to show them that their voices mattered. A teaching opportunity at Aspen High School brought her to the Roaring Fork Valley for the first time in 2011. It was love at first sight, and she’s still in a bit of awe that she can call this place home.  

 

Christin refuels by skiing, biking, hiking and just breathing in the mountains. Her newest adventure is becoming a mom in November of 2016. She lives in Carbondale with her husband Jeremy, her son Weston and her dog Yalla. She loves to talk books and podcasts, so if you have a recommendation for her, let her know!   

Interesting stories, and how they are crafted, are at the heart of what Christin loves about public radio. She believes that a well-told story can inspire, open and connect. She is honored to be a part of Aspen Public Radio and to have the opportunity to bring stories from the Roaring Fork Valley to life every day.

Ways to Connect

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Wyatt Orme bring you a compilation of the week's news.  

Valley residents have a connection to the Colorado River.  But our up-close-and-personal view of the river is only part of really understanding it...and the demands that are placed on it.  

The Walton Family Foundation recently announced that it will invest 20 million dollars to protect the Colorado river. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy stepped into the studio to talk about the impact that the money might have, as well as some of the threats facing the Colorado.

 

 

 

 

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Claire Woodcock bring you a compilation of the week's news.  

In recent years, the founding fathers have almost become deities—figures to be revered for their role in creating our nation. But do they deserve being ascribed these God-like qualities? After all, many of them were slave owners, had personal lives filled with scandal, and had feuds that impaired their focus on the country. And, almost all of them had serious reservations about democracy and the viability of country they were creating.

Our phones and computers make our lives easier in a lot of ways...but we also pay a price.  Our personal data is big business for some companies. Is it possible to safeguard our privacy in this surveillance economy?  News Director Carolyn Sackariason shares what she heard from this year's Aspen Ideas Festival from the "Re-imagining the Internet" track.  

Hate groups and hate-fueled incidents are spiking in America. The Southern Poverty Law Center, through aggregating media reports and gathered submissions from its website, recently catalogued 1051 acts of intimidation and hate in the first month after Trump won the presidency. What is the evidence of this rising tide, and what does it look like in our communities? What groups are most frequently targeted today? What theories might explain this rise, and what can Americans who value tolerance do to fight back?

As the United States leaves the Paris Agreement, how will the leadership vacuum be filled? Will China continue to surge ahead, tackling air pollution and investing in renewable energy? Will India soon abandon its commitments, favoring coal development over clean air? If choices that individual countries make in regard to their energy mix have planet-wide consequences, does abandoning Paris signal the end of the US-led international order? What role does vulnerability reduction play in the new landscape of global climate solutions and policy?

Journalists Charles Sykes, Melissa Block, James Fallows and Joshua Johnson have made careers out of asking questions and listening to American voices. Especially over the past year, when we’ve so often been described as deeply and hopelessly divided, what have these keen observers gleaned from thousands of conversations and interactions with individuals around the country? Do they agree with this assessment? What do they find are the best ways to uncover authentic thoughts and feelings beneath oceans of superficial labels and assumptions?

An intersection is a place where you have to consider a path that's different than the one you've been on.  You have to pay attention. So it's an appropriate name for one of the tracks at the Spotlight Health 2017 conference.  Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy talks to us about what she heard at the conference this year about the intersection between human health and planet earth.  

When is the truth the truth, a lie a lie, and what constitutes mere BS in an era that many refer to as “post-truth”? This panel addresses the kinds of critical and largely ethical questions we confront in our modern-day discourse, exploring the intent of the First Amendment (does it protect lies?), the reasons we lie (or, in fact, are we just strategically misleading?), and, through the lens of a lawyer, a fact checker, and a scientist, the ways various of us define and “get to” the truth.

White working class voters without a college education are most vulnerable to diseases of despair, and they are also most likely to have voted for President Trump. This population is deeply concerned about rising health insurance costs, and more likely to lose their health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. Panelists James Fransham, Sue Curry, Mollyanne Brodie, and Joanne Kenen discuss what we know about the connections between health and politics, and why these connections matter.  

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme bring you a compilation of the week's news. 

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Wyatt Orme bring you a compilation of the week's news. 

Ann Mullins and Ward Hauenstein fought their way through a crowded field to be elected to Aspen City Council. Mullins was elected in the first round of voting. Hauenstein was elected Tuesday night by a narrow margin of just 29 votes in the runoff election.

Christin and Alycin Bektesh sat down to talk about sthe mood on election night, big decisions facing the council and what the new dynamic might bring.

      

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Wyatt Orme bring you a compilation of the week's news.  

Our guest today is Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University. Julianne studies the effects of social relationships and social isolation on health and longevity.   

Her research has found that loneliness can be just as unhealthy as smoking and obesity, and she’s encouraging the medical community to consider the importance of relationships when talking to patients.  

             

A slew of changes are coming to the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority, the first of which passed last week. APCHA raised the asset cap for applicants. Alycin Bektesh covers housing issues and tells us what's in the works. If you're looking at affordable housing in Aspen, you want to hear this one.

On this week's Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Christin Kay bring you a compilation of the week's news. 

Our first guest is Steven Keating.  When a tumor was discovered in Steven’s brain, he wanted to know everything he could about it, even choosing to stay awake during the surgery that removed the mass. But getting information about his own treatment was much more complicated than he anticipated. His experience led him to become a patient advocate.  He now works on technology that would make medical data more accessible and easier to understand for patients themselves.  

The Dial- May 24, 2017

May 25, 2017

  The numbers are in on how the Aspen/Snowmass resort did during the 2016-17 ski season. And it was a story of feast or famine. News Director Carolyn Sackariason covers the ski industry. She breaks down the winter occupancy rate for us and lets us know just how busy we can expect it to be this summer.

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