Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Roaring Fork River running through Aspen is not as healthy as the city or the state think it should be, and now is the time for action.  

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County’s Healthy Rivers Board handed out thousands of dollars in grants Thursday, including one project that has high schoolers keeping a 24-hour watch on wildlife.

courtesy of www.gardner.senate.gov

Senator Cory Gardner is scheduled to be in Glenwood Springs tonight at a fundraiser for Garfield County Republicans. Local activists plan to be there, too.

courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

In this politically charged year, environmentalists from across the country are planning for Earth Day marches and other activities to show support for science on Saturday, April 22.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

It’s mid-April, with mild temperatures and sunshine on the snow-capped peaks above Avalanche Creek. The grasses and shrubs along the valley floor are still golden brown, inching toward green. It won’t rain today but there’s a front moving in tomorrow, and it’s windy. All of this means the variables are coming together for fire.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Garfield County commissioners voted Monday to rezone part of a residential neighborhood in Battlement Mesa to allow for an injection well.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

City of Aspen voters will elect a mayor and two council seats next month. Some locals are pushing for new blood on council, largely because of the current council’s vote to hold on to water rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon creeks. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the issue and is here to give us an update.

courtesy photo

The Carbondale Board of Trustees is scheduled to review a draft Climate Action Plan tomorrow night.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

As the weather heats up, local energy organizations and utilities are offering residents opportunities to make their homes more efficient.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Summer in Snowmass means biking, hiking, sightseeing and soon a climbing wall, zipline and an alpine coaster. The U.S. Forest Service gave initial approval last month for a suite of recreational activities on the Elk Camp side of the ski area. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy spoke with Forest Service mountain sports manager Roger Poirier about the plans.

 

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Local environmental group Wilderness Workshop hosted an event with the legal non-profit Earthjustice last week. The panel discussion was titled “Resistance: in the courts and on the ground.” Elizabeth Stewart-Severy was there and spoke with producer Christin Kay about the event.

Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County commissioners showed lukewarm interest Tuesday in Jazz Aspen Snowmass’ latest plan to offer affordable lodging to Labor Day festival concert-goers.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Erik Weihenmayer is an accomplished mountaineer, kayaker and motivational speaker. He’s also blind. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy joined Weihenmayer on the mountain while he was in town promoting his latest book and has this profile.

courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Boaters headed to Ruedi Reservoir will find new gates at the boat ramp, restricting access to only times when officials can screen for two destructive species of mussels. In years past, officials have been running boat inspections five days a week; that’s been increased to seven days a week, from dawn to dusk this summer.

A decade ago, City of Aspen officials identified a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by the year 2020. But, with just three years left on that target, those emissions are down only 7.5 percent. Workers with the Canary Initiative, Aspen’s climate team, are devising a new plan that will identify specific steps to make progress.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service plans to burn up to 500 acres near Avalanche Creek today and this weekend, if the weather conditions allow.

Courtesy of Brett Meredith/RFTA

Beginner mountain bikers will soon have a new place to play, but first the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) needs help building it.

Local environmental watchdog Wilderness Workshop joins forces with the legal non-profit Earthjustice tonight for a discussion about how to safeguard public lands.

Courtesy of Betty Severy

Local law enforcement responded to at least three calls in the past week regarding traffic hangups as a result of wildlife on the roads — but in a new twist, these delays were caused by a turkey. The bird had been hanging around the median of Highway 82 between the Maroon Creek Bridge and the airport for over a week.

Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management

Last week, the Bureau of Land Management completed a long-debated land exchange with the billionaire Wexner family. The federal agency traded nearly 1,500 acres of land near the base of Mount Sopris for two properties totaling 670 acres of once-private land that is close to popular recreation areas in Carbondale. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the development and spoke with producer Christin Kay about the deal.

 

Pages