Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be making a return to both the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, and the field of journalism. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen, and is thrilled to be reporting about all things environmental in this special place. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship, and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is looking forward to combining her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Warm temperatures have accelerated snowmelt, and local fire officials are advising caution with any kind of burning.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The U.S. Forest Service faces a major backlog in trail maintenance and is now looking to identify a few key areas where it can pick up the pace.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service has released a draft decision that approves major recreation updates at Snowmass Ski Area.

Courtesy of www.congress.gov

Congressman Scott Tipton held a telephone town hall earlier this month, where he discussed health care, energy policy and public lands. Last week, he was working on infrastructure ideas for the National Park Service and Forest Service. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat in on the phone call and has been following his work on public lands. She discussed the congressman’s policies and communication with producer Christin Kay.  

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

A wildfire along Lower River Road yesterday threatened one home and burned about 6 acres near the Roaring Fork River. High winds spread a burning debris pile across private land. Though flames reached within 50 feet of a home, no buildings were damaged.

A renowned mountaineer and kayaker speaks Monday in Aspen, but this adventure story has a twist.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

The 2017 World Cup Finals featured all the traditional races, and one that will make its Olympic debut next year. The Alpine Team Event is starting to carve out a niche in the elite ski racing world.

Courtesy of www.instagram.com/fisalpine

As temperatures rise into the sixties this week, World Cup officials are concerned about degrading course conditions. But so far, firm snow is holding, thanks in part to a variation of table salt.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

It’s an idyllic scene out of a ski resort ad: After a long day skiing, return home and warm your bones by the roaring fire. Donnie Lee, general manager at the Gant, knows the appeal this has for visitors.

Courtesy of Protect Our Winters

Alongside the swag, food, and festivities at World Cup Village at Wagner Park, ski racers and fans alike will have a chance to take political action.

Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen Skiing Company is running on all cylinders as the World Cup finals kick off this week. The company also recently released a sustainability report that details progress toward reducing its carbon footprint and working on environmental causes. News director Carolyn Sackariason sat down with environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy to talk about how SkiCo approaches events like World Cup and works toward large-scale change.

Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County officials are digging deep to learn more about local impacts of climate change.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

More than half a million people used Pitkin County’s public trail network in 2016.

Courtesy of www.congress.gov

U.S. Congressman Scott Tipton spoke to more than 5,000 constituents for an hour Wednesday evening, in a so-called “tele town hall.”

Courtesy of coppercolorado.com

The U.S. Forest Service has approved a plan for an alpine coaster and other recreation options at Copper Mountain Resort. A similar plan in Snowmass is still under review.

Courtesy of U.S. Department of the Interior

Last month, Congressional Republicans made initial moves to repeal a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) rule aimed at reducing methane emissions from oil and gas development. This BLM regulation is modeled, in part, after a state law in Colorado. News director Carolyn Sackariason sat down with environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy to talk about how such a repeal would affect Coloradans.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Aspen City Council approved requests Monday night to fund two studies that are designed to analyze the risks to the town’s future water supply.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Jay Parker knows his way around Aspen’s mine tunnels. He’s spent about 40 years working at the Smuggler Mine. On a recent tour, he added consideration of water storage to the history and geology that he provides.

Courtesy of www.aspentrailfinder.com

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) beat out two other local organizations for a $3,000 grant from Aspen Trail Finder.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is working to retain conditional water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle Creeks, and the court battle could get expensive.

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