Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

After the city took a rare step in seeking public input, staff is rejecting the overwhelming suggestion to abandon the rights. David Hornbacher, who is heading up the project for the city, wrote in a memo to city council that staff recommends keeping those rights.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Fire officials are keeping a close eye on a fire burning about a mile northwest of Highland Bowl.

The Maroon Fire was ignited by lightning last Tuesday, and smoke was visible yesterday. Firefighters are not on the ground because of potential dangers.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journaiism

City of Aspen staff is directing council to keep water rights for reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this goes against public sentiment.

Trailsource.com

Local nonprofit Wilderness Workshop is seeking volunteers for a restoration project on Sunday to remove barbed wire on Buttermilk.

Aspen Public Radio News

A section of the Roaring Fork River is closed to boaters and anglers as crews start building two recreational waves above the Town of Basalt. Pitkin County attorney John Ely said the project is intended as a safeguard against drought.   

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Corbett and Grace Lunsford have been on the road for six months, without ever leaving their home. Their mobile living space serves as a model for efficient and sustainable buildings. This week, they parked their home in Carbondale to give tours.

Courtesy of Aspen Global Change Institute

Kidney expert Dr. Richard Johnson discusses how climate change relates to the evolution of mankind tonight as part of the Aspen Global Change Institute’s public speaker series.

 

Johnson, who is the chief of the renal division and hypertension at the University of Colorado, researches kidney disease, diabetes and obesity, and he has found connections to climate change in his studies.

Courtesy of www.garfield-county.com

The state approved 22 oil and gas wells in a Battlement Mesa residential community late last week.

Courtesy of USFWS

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will need to reconsider designating the southern Rockies for special protection for lynx.

The Hanging Lake Trail in Glenwood Canyon will be closed tomorrow as volunteer crews work on final stages of a restoration project.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

 

Officials with Pitkin County Open Space and Trails are asking for public input on recent changes at North Star Nature Preserve.

Aspen Public Radio News

For the first time in about 15 years, the Aspen-area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife may live in the Aspen area.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Cyclists and runners along the Rio Grande Trail are seeing a different kind of wildlife this month. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority has hired a herd of goats to eat weeds along the path from Glenwood Springs to Emma.

Hubbard Cave outside of Glenwood has been closed to humans since 2010, and officials with the White River National Forest are proposing keeping it this way for the next three years. The move is an effort to prevent White Nose Syndrome, which has killed more than 6 million bats in the eastern United States.

Courtesy of Western Adventures, Inc.

The U.S. Forest Service released a draft decision to reissue a permit for Western Adventures to lead guided snowmobile tours on public land outside of Lenado.

Aspen Public Radio News

The Oklahoma Flats Trail, one of Aspen’s busiest commuter paths, reopens today with several improvements.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Mule deer may seem ubiquitous in the Roaring Fork Valley, but Colorado Parks and Wildlife say numbers of the species are below its target in some key areas near Rifle. The state agency plans to kill mountain lions and bears in an effort to help grow the deer population.

Courtesy of www.pexels.com

The University of Colorado Boulder has launched a brand new Space Minor program for undergraduate students.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen is dipping its toes into the realm of food security and encouraging residents to grow their own vegetables and herbs.

Courtesy of the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Firefighters in Eagle and Garfield counties plan to ignite two prescribed burns in the upcoming weeks.

 

The fires will be on Bureau of Land Management lands in the coming weeks if the weather cooperates to keep conditions safe and to blow smoke away from local communities.

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