Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen City Council is scheduled to discuss renewing its contract to monitor air quality today. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this is part of an ongoing effort to reduce pollution.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will offer 31 oil and gas leases for sale this December, but these sales will happen online.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Inmates from the Buena Vista Correctional Facility spent four weeks in September doing restoration and maintenance work in the wilderness on Independence Pass. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy spent a morning with the group and has details about Colorado’s inmate work program.

Two candidates for Pitkin County commissioner faced off last night at a live debate hosted by Aspen Public Radio. Greg Poschman and Scott Writer are running for a vacant seat on the board and discussed affordable housing, development, and the open space and trails program.     

Garfield County Commissioners will discuss a permit for a natural gas pipeline today.

 

Courtesy of RFTA.com

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority bought into a solar array last year, but the forecast doesn’t look so bright.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

The “Living Lab” project that widened Castle Creek bridge for pedestrians and cyclists is being removed today and tomorrow.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

This fall, as thousands of hunters head into the Roaring Fork Valley’s backcountry, they may find more mountain lions, but fewer elk. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has the details of this year’s hunting landscape.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Aspen City Council voted unanimously last night to keep the water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks. The vote comes despite public opposition.

Aspen Public Radio News

Jeremy Jones is the founder and president of Protect Our Winters (POW), a climate change advocacy group made up of winter sports athletes. He caught up with environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy at an event as part of last week’s ski industry get-together “The Meeting” to talk about his work in the past decade.

Aspen Public Radio News

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority and a statewide advocacy group spoke to Colorado’s transit needs yesterday.

Courtesy of www.goco.org

The board for Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) meets in Carbondale on Thursday and Friday.  

The organization uses Colorado Lottery revenue to provide grants to projects that protect and enhance Colorado’s parks, trails, wildlife and open spaces. Since its inception in 1992, GOCO has given about $18.5 million to Eagle County, $10.2 million to Garfield County and $7.6 million to Pitkin County.  

Aspen Public Radio News

A semi-truck carrying rocks to the Basalt whitewater park construction area overturned Tuesday afternoon. It spilled about 5 gallons of diesel fuel and a small amount of hydraulic fluid on the ground. Contractors contained the spill, and Pitkin County Environmental Health Manager Kurt Dahl said in a statement that he was confident it was contained. Project engineers will assess the site today.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Snowmass Town Council will review the final draft of a recreation and open space plan today.

 

Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio News

Mayor Steve Skadron is speaking on a panel about green cities in Dubai this week. It is the third major international environmental conference for Skadron since he represented Aspen at the UN climate talks in Paris last December. Skadron has also spoken at events in Taiwan and Seoul, South Korea.

Residences at the Little Nell promotional photo

Five months after discovering fecal matter leaking from the Residences at the Little Nell into Aspen’s stormwater drainage, the hotel remains cut off from the city’s system.

 Former state Sen. Gail Schwartz, a Democrat who used to live in Snowmass Village, is challenging Republican Rep. Scott Tipton of Cortez in the race for Colorado’s Third Congressional District.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Words

Jenny Price, Aspen Words’ writer in residence for September, spent her month here working on her book titled “Stop Saving the Planet!”

Price describes the book as a polemical text, and it highlights the flaws she sees in the design of current environmental change movements. Price said she hopes that the book starts a dialogue.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails has opened a new world for mountain bikers at Sky Mountain Park since 2012, but some are saying it’s destroying a key habitat for area wildlife. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy checked out the newest trail in the network to see how the program balances ecological concerns with growing demand for recreation.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Last night, Aspen City Council approved an ordinance to fine heavy duty diesel vehicles that emit too much smoke.

 

The new law localizes a state-wide regulation that requires diesel vehicles to keep emissions below 40 percent opacity, which is the measure of the particulate in smoke from trucks. Trucks are periodically stopped and tested; six of the 33 trucks at a test conducted earlier this summer failed.

Pages