Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Aspen Public Radio News

A semi-truck carrying rocks to the Basalt whitewater park construction area overturned Tuesday afternoon. It spilled about 5 gallons of diesel fuel and a small amount of hydraulic fluid on the ground. Contractors contained the spill, and Pitkin County Environmental Health Manager Kurt Dahl said in a statement that he was confident it was contained. Project engineers will assess the site today.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Snowmass Town Council will review the final draft of a recreation and open space plan today.

 

Marci Krivonen/Aspen Public Radio News

Mayor Steve Skadron is speaking on a panel about green cities in Dubai this week. It is the third major international environmental conference for Skadron since he represented Aspen at the UN climate talks in Paris last December. Skadron has also spoken at events in Taiwan and Seoul, South Korea.

Residences at the Little Nell promotional photo

Five months after discovering fecal matter leaking from the Residences at the Little Nell into Aspen’s stormwater drainage, the hotel remains cut off from the city’s system.

 Former state Sen. Gail Schwartz, a Democrat who used to live in Snowmass Village, is challenging Republican Rep. Scott Tipton of Cortez in the race for Colorado’s Third Congressional District.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Words

Jenny Price, Aspen Words’ writer in residence for September, spent her month here working on her book titled “Stop Saving the Planet!”

Price describes the book as a polemical text, and it highlights the flaws she sees in the design of current environmental change movements. Price said she hopes that the book starts a dialogue.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails has opened a new world for mountain bikers at Sky Mountain Park since 2012, but some are saying it’s destroying a key habitat for area wildlife. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy checked out the newest trail in the network to see how the program balances ecological concerns with growing demand for recreation.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Last night, Aspen City Council approved an ordinance to fine heavy duty diesel vehicles that emit too much smoke.

 

The new law localizes a state-wide regulation that requires diesel vehicles to keep emissions below 40 percent opacity, which is the measure of the particulate in smoke from trucks. Trucks are periodically stopped and tested; six of the 33 trucks at a test conducted earlier this summer failed.

Aspen Public Radio News

After 40 years working for the U.S. Forest Service, Martha Moran is retiring. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy spent a day at Maroon Lake last week with the recreation planner and has this profile.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Aspen Skiing Company announced yesterday that it is accepting applications for grants to support environmental projects.

 

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service, www.fs.usda.gov

Candidates running for local, state, and national offices speak tonight in Carbondale about management and funding of public lands.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Some of the water from the Roaring Fork watershed follows the usual route, from high peaks down to the Colorado River. But much of the snowmelt and rain from this basin is redirected to water-starved cities on the Front Range. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy joined a rare tour of the tunnels that move water to the other side of Independence Pass.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

After the city took a rare step in seeking public input, staff is rejecting the overwhelming suggestion to abandon the rights. David Hornbacher, who is heading up the project for the city, wrote in a memo to city council that staff recommends keeping those rights.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Fire officials are keeping a close eye on a fire burning about a mile northwest of Highland Bowl.

The Maroon Fire was ignited by lightning last Tuesday, and smoke was visible yesterday. Firefighters are not on the ground because of potential dangers.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

City of Aspen staff is directing council to keep water rights for reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this goes against public sentiment.

Trailsource.com

Local nonprofit Wilderness Workshop is seeking volunteers for a restoration project on Sunday to remove barbed wire on Buttermilk.

Aspen Public Radio News

A section of the Roaring Fork River is closed to boaters and anglers as crews start building two recreational waves above the Town of Basalt. Pitkin County attorney John Ely said the project is intended as a safeguard against drought.   

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Corbett and Grace Lunsford have been on the road for six months, without ever leaving their home. Their mobile living space serves as a model for efficient and sustainable buildings. This week, they parked their home in Carbondale to give tours.

Courtesy of Aspen Global Change Institute

Kidney expert Dr. Richard Johnson discusses how climate change relates to the evolution of mankind tonight as part of the Aspen Global Change Institute’s public speaker series.

 

Johnson, who is the chief of the renal division and hypertension at the University of Colorado, researches kidney disease, diabetes and obesity, and he has found connections to climate change in his studies.

Courtesy of www.garfield-county.com

The state approved 22 oil and gas wells in a Battlement Mesa residential community late last week.

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