Martin Kaste

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers the news throughout the Northwest, with an emphasis on technology and privacy stories.

In addition to general assignment reporting throughout the region, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Focusing on technology and privacy issues, Kaste has reported on the government's wireless wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that goes on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in a US Supreme Court opinion concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as a reporter for NPR based in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a policital reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota.

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3:53pm

Fri April 18, 2014
The Salt

In The Land Of Razor Clams, Dinner Hides Deep Within The Sand

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:13 pm

Clams this fresh taste like tender calamari.
Martin Kaste/NPR

As soon as you drive into town, it's pretty clear that Long Beach, Wash., is all about the razor clam. The first clue is the giant frying pan. It's 14 feet tall and a relic of the clam festivals of the 1940s. And then there's the clam statue that spits when you insert a quarter.

But if you really want to see how much people here love their clams, you'd have to be like Karen Harrell and get up before dawn and drive out onto the blustery beach to go clam digging.

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9:50am

Tue April 15, 2014
All Tech Considered

Apple Upgrade Tracks Customers Even When Marketing Apps Are Off

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 8:50 am

iPhone geotracking gets better. Or is it worse?
Patrick Kovarik AFP/Getty Images

The people who design marketing apps are celebrating a change in the way iBeacon works on iPhones. That's the Bluetooth-based system that lets a store track a customer's movements, and capitalize on them. For instance, if iBeacon detects you lingering in the shoe department, it might send you a digital coupon for socks.

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2:16pm

Wed April 2, 2014
News

Survey: Americans Skeptical Of Prison For Non-Violent Drug Crimes

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:54 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now to a new survey from the Pew Research Center that's found more evidence of a shift in public attitudes toward illegal drug use.

As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, the survey indicates growing public skepticism about prison terms for nonviolent drug offenders.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: This shift has been going on for a while now. Previous polls already showed a new majority in favor of legalizing marijuana. But in this survey, you also see changing attitudes toward harder drugs.

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2:04pm

Mon March 31, 2014
Around the Nation

Washington Landslide Takes A Grim — And Fluctuating — Toll

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:52 pm

The official death toll from the Washington State mudslide now stands at 24, with dozens of people still listed as missing. At one point, there were more than 170 unaccounted for.

12:54pm

Tue March 25, 2014
All Tech Considered

Your Smartphone Is A Crucial Police Tool, If They Can Crack It

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 5:28 pm

READ: A List Of Known Vulnerabilities For The Major Smartphones On The Market " href="/post/your-smartphone-crucial-police-tool-if-they-can-crack-it" class="noexit lightbox">

New software and gizmos are revolutionizing police work, with social media scanners, facial recognition and other high tech items. As it turns out, though, the single most valuable new police tool is your smartphone.

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