Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Police in Indonesia say that a U.S. couple being held in connection with the brutal killing of a 62-year-old Chicago woman while the three vacationed in Bali could face the death penalty if they are charged with premeditated murder.

The body of Sheila von Wiese-Mack was found stuffed in a bloodied suitcase on the resort island of Bali on Tuesday. After a preliminary investigation, Indonesian police detained the woman's 19-year-old daughter, Heather Mack, and Mack's boyfriend, Tommy Schaefer, 21.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET.

Ukraine's president says Kiev's artillery destroyed a "significant" part of a Russian armored column that is said to have crossed the border overnight.

Russia called the claim a "fantasy."

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET.

Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki announced today that he will step down and endorse his nominated successor, state television says.

Maliki, who has been under increasing pressure to step aside, will be succeeded by Haider al-Abadi, from the prime minister's own Dawa Party, who was appointed on Monday and had begun the process of forming a Cabinet despite Maliki's angry denunciations.

The wife of Robin Williams, who took his own life on Monday, says the actor/comedian was sober at the time of death, but suffering from the early stages of Parkinson's disease, a progressive and debilitating neuromuscular condition.

"Robin's sobriety was intact" at the time of his suicide, Susan Schneider said. "[He] struggled with his own battles of depression, anxiety as well as early stages of Parkinson's disease, which he was not yet ready to share publicly."

It's been a cutthroat existence for Colorado's state fish.

The rare greenback cutthroat trout, for years on the receiving end of a well-meaning, but taxonomically misguided attempt to save it, now seems to be back on track (though not out of the woods).

Update at 2:25 p.m. ET.

President Obama says U.S. airstrikes have broken a siege by Islamic militants of minority Yazidis on a mountaintop in northwestern Iraq and it's unlikely that more airdrops of humanitarian aid will be necessary.

"Our military was able to successfully strike ISIL targets around the mountain," where the militant group had laid siege to the Yazidis, he said.

He said U.S. airstrikes against the militants would continue "to protect our people and facilities in Iraq."

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET:

President Obama is calling the situation in Ferguson, Mo., where violence has broken out in the aftermath of a police shooting of an unarmed black teenager, "heartbreaking and tragic."

Speaking in Edgartown, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard where he is vacationing, Obama said he received a briefing this morning from Attorney General Eric Holder.

So far, a five-day extension to a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas appears to be holding, NPR's Jackie Northam reports from Jerusalem.

She says, "There were a few tense hours before the ... extension was announced — rockets were fired from Gaza into southern Israel, and the Israeli military responded with airstrikes. But it's been quiet since, as both sides prepare to return to Egyptian-brokered negotiations aimed at creating a long-term truce."

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has won Turkey's first-ever direct presidential election, with an unofficial 53 percent of the vote.

Opposition candidate Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu conceded defeat in elections, offering congratulations to Erdogan in a brief statement to reporters in Istanbul.

AP reports:

We've already had one "supermoon" this summer and there's another one due next month, but the one you might see Sunday night has astronomy fans running out of lunar superlatives. National Geographic is calling it an "extra-supermoon."

As NatGeo explains:

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