Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

In an unexpected announcement Thursday, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy dropped out of the race to succeed John Boehner as House speaker.

Although the Republican representative from California was expected to win, his support was undermined Wednesday night when the Freedom Caucus, a 40-member conservative splinter group, endorsed Republican Rep. Daniel Webster of Florida instead.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, a member of the Freedom Caucus, for his reaction.

Fifty years before Rosa Parks helped spark the modern civil rights movement by refusing to give up her seat in the colored section of a city bus to a white passenger, the African-American community in Nashville, Tennessee, took a bold stand – with a dash of entrepreneurial spirit – against Jim Crow laws on their streetcars. Nina Cardona from Here & Now contributor WPLN has the story.

Dealing With Alcoholism In The Family

3 hours ago

A memoir called “A Common Struggle,” released Tuesday by former Rhode Island Congressman Patrick Kennedy, bears all about his family’s health and alleged addictions.

The portrait of his father, the late U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy, and his mother Joan, breaks what he calls a “conspiracy of silence” about how alcoholism poisoned the family. Others are disputing the account, including his older brother, Ted Kennedy Jr., a Connecticut state senator.

The latest Steve Jobs biopic may be named after the late Apple CEO, but critics are already standing by, worried that it may not do justice in how it portrays him. The film, from veteran screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle, opens in select theaters Friday.

It fronts an all-star cast with Michael Fassbender playing the lead in a three-act dramatization of some of the most pivotal product launches in Jobs’ career (curiously, the iPhone launch of 2007 is not one of them).

The gym chain Planet Fitness has found itself in the middle of a national debate over how to accommodate transgender people in single-sex spaces like bathrooms and locker rooms.

Earlier this year, Yvette Cormier complained to her gym in Midland, Michigan, after seeing a transgender woman in the women’s locker room. Cormier took it upon herself to “warn” other customers of the transgender-friendly policy. The gym canceled her membership, and now she’s suing.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneidermann is launching an inquiry into two major companies: New York-based FanDuel and Boston-based DraftKings are the top dogs in the daily fantasy sports industry. That’s where people create virtual teams of actual pro sports players, and try to outscore other people’s virtual teams. And they do it for money, weekly or even daily.

Two major, rival fantasy sports companies—FanDuel and DraftKings—are barring their employees from betting on fantasy games, amid allegations of insider trading.

This comes after an employee at DraftKings admitted to accidentally releasing valuable data, such as what players the majority of participants were betting on, ahead of the third week of N.F.L games. That employee won $350,000 at rival site, FanDuel, the same week.

The introduction of infant formula led many women to stop breastfeeding in the 1950s and ’60s. It has taken decades, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say breastfeeding rates are on the rise.

Although it’s the most natural way to feed babies, and there is a scientific consensus on the benefits of breastfeeding, it can be extremely difficult for some mothers.

The trio known as Algiers fuses gospel and punk music to confront racism, cultural assimilation and other issues specific to the American experience.

The band members are from Georgia, and there is a distinct Southern sound to much of their music.

Franklin James Fisher, Algiers’ lead singer and songwriter, talks to Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti about the band’s mission.

Chvrches started out humble enough. A few singles hitting the Internet, some online buzz and a debut album recorded in a basement.

Less than four years later, however, and the band is massive – headlining summer festival stops the past two years across the country, while playing more than 350 shows.