Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

HBO's New Documentary Captures Terror On Film

It seemed like just a normal, busy shopping day on September 21, 2013 at the West Gate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya.

Everything suddenly changed when four men from the terrorist group Al Shabab attacked the mall with high-powered weapons. The attack went on for hours and more than 60 people were killed. Nearly all of the carnage was captured on security cameras.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Frustration Over Fracking Could Play Role In November Elections

Anti-fracking activist Kaye Fissinger gestures out to a reservoir near her community of Longmont where oil and gas companies are looking to drill.(Brian Gill/Inside Energy)

Communities in Colorado have been engaged in a political fight with the state to get more local control over oil and gas drilling.

It's a battle many thought was heading to the ballot box this November, until a last minute compromise stopped the initiative in its tracks.

Colorado’s governor John Hickenlooper declared the compromise a victory, but that left some members of the state’s environmental community furious and vowing payback on election day.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Baja Coast Gets Pummeled By Hurricane Odile

Winds blow palm trees on the beach in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. (Victor R. Caivano/AP)

Residents and tourists hunkered down in shelters and hotel conference rooms overnight as a powerful and sprawling Hurricane Odile made landfall on the southern Baja California peninsula.

The area is home to gleaming megaresorts, tiny fishing communities and low-lying neighborhoods of flimsy homes. Forecasters predicted a dangerous storm surge with large waves as well as drenching rains capable of causing landslides and flash floods.

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NPR Story
1:54 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

SNL Will Soon Have A New Face On Its Oldest Segment

Comedian Michael Che will be the new co-host of Saturday Night Lives "Weekend Update." He is seen here performing in a Comedy Central special. Screenshot from Comedy Central)

Michael Che, known for his role as reporter on the Daily Show, will join Colin Jost as co-anchor of Saturday Night Live’s “Weekend Update,” replacing Cecily Strong, who will stay on as a cast member.

Eric Deggans, NPR’s TV critic, joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer and Jeremy Hobson to discuss what the move will bring to the segment.

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NPR Story
1:54 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Drought, Heat Contribute To West Nile Spike In California

The San Jose Vector Control Agency was spaying pesticide to kill mosquitoes in April. California has seen a spike in West Nile cases. (Don McCullough/Flickr)

This week, Orange County, California has been spraying certain neighborhoods for mosquitoes. The city is trying to combat its worst-ever recorded outbreak of West Nile virus.

Orange County has emerged as a particular hot spot for West Nile this year, and the virus is on the rise across California, in both mosquitoes and people.

At least 238 people have been infected so far this year, and nine are known to have died. Two major reasons behind the spike in West Nile in California are unusually warm temperatures, and the drought.

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