Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Dean Of Boston Sports Journalism Celebrates 42 Years On The Job

Jonny Miller and Robin Young (Robin Young)

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 2:04 pm

One of the most-beloved sportscasters you’ve probably never heard of is Jonny Miller.

He’s covered professional sports in Boston for 42 years for CBS powerhouse, WBZ Radio.

He’s called the Helen Thomas of the local sports press corps, because he always gets to ask the first questions.

And he’s earned the respect of players and sports writers, because he does it all, while living with cerebral palsy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young profiles Miller and his long career.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Business Roundup: From Stocks To The Dollar

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 25, 2014 in New York City. US stocks saw their biggest downturn since July. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

U.S. stocks posted their biggest one-day drop since late July, amid concerns about global growth.

China is signaling it won’t undertake more aggressive stimulus measures and Europe’s economy is showing more signs of sluggishness.

Bloomberg News’ Michael Regan speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shift.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

After Huge Debut, A Tough Week For Apple

In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, people wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The Apple's new devices were released on Friday in Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan. (Vincent Yu/AP)

It started out so well.

Thousands — no millions — of people lining up to buy the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus.

On Monday, Apple made an announcement: More than 10 million phones sold. A company record.

The new phones are bigger than previous generations; the 6 plus sports a 5 1/2 inch screen.

But that was part of the problem.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

The Lawyer Who Would 'Stop At Nothing To Win'

Lawyer Steven Donziger, left, walks with his clients who are members of Ecuador's indigenous Cofan tribe to Federal Court in New York for their hearing with lawyers for Texaco Monday, Feb. 1, 1999. The Ecuadorian rainforest was polluted by Texaco oil drilling. (Adam Nadel/AP)

Bloomberg Businessweek senior writer Paul Barrett chronicles the 20 year long legal battle waged by human rights lawyer Steven Donziger in the book, “Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who’d Stop at Nothing to Win It.

Donziger won compensation for Ecuadorian tribes whose land was polluted by Texaco oil drilling, but he then lost everything when the oil company sued him for dirty tactics.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

How To Translate Good Science Into Good Copy

Physicist Christina Love talks about her PhD thesis on dark matter at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Center City Philadelphia. She organized the event called "Start Talking Science"(Susan Philllips/WHYY)

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, told delegates at the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Summit in New York today that the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report – compiled by hundreds of scientists – had three key findings:

One: Human influence on the climate is clear and growing.

Two: Quick and decisive action is needed to avoid destructive outcomes.

Three: There are means to limit climate change. That language is pretty simple and clear.

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