Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

The United States says climate change will be front and center on the agenda of the Arctic Council – the intergovernmental body made up of eight countries with territories in the region.

The U.S. is now chair of the council, which includes Russia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Founded in 1996, the council’s purpose is to promote cooperation in the region. They are not policymakers, but do advise governments on issues related to the Arctic.

Today is the 45th anniversary of the killing of four students by National Guard troops on the campus of Kent State University in Ohio during a rally to protest U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

The cultural divisions of those times have been examined in numerous books and documentaries, but sometimes history leaves its mark in other ways.

Comcast reported today that its total revenue rose 2.6 percent in the quarter that ended March 31, surpassing analyst expectations.

The earnings report comes after Comcast abandoned its plans to merge with Time Warner Cable, amid news of increased scrutiny from regulators over the deal.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Comcast’s earnings with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News.

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

Lincoln History Told Through Tree Rings

May 1, 2015

In 1992, the Lincoln Vault Oak was cut down to protect Abraham Lincoln’s burial vault.

At the president’s funeral in 1865, the tree stood just a few feet from the event, shading the funeral choir.

When the tree was finally cut down, local arborist Guy Sternberg salvaged the massive stump and began a dissection project that peeled back the layers of history to reveal clues about that day.

Sternberg speaks with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd about what he was able to learn.

 

The free music streaming service Grooveshark has closed down its service after a six-year legal battle with the music industry.

The closure of the service, owned by Escape Media, is part of a settlement with Universal Music Group, Sony Music and Warner Music Group, in which the company issued a formal apology in lieu of paying damages to the labels.

When people think of George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, Va., usually comes to mind – but that’s just where he lived later in life. Our first president spent most of his childhood at Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Va.

The house itself has long since been destroyed, but after years of excavation, archaeologists have found its exact location, along with hundreds of thousands of artifacts. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matthew Schwartz of WAMU went there to hear the tale.

When President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train left Indianapolis on May 1, 1865, it turned north to Chicago. But Here & Now’s series Tracking Lincoln is going due west to Decatur, Illinois.

Lincoln lived near Decatur long before he became president. It’s said that he made his first public speech right there in the center of town, where a statue of the young president-to-be now stands.

The death toll in Nepal continues to climb after a devastating earthquake over the weekend. Sean Casey, an aid worker with the International Medical Corps, joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins from Kathmandu to discuss the response methods.

Casey says his organization is exploring the use of drones to get a view of how remote villages were affected by the earthquake. Access to many of those villages has been hampered by the damage from the earthquake.

Adrienne LaFrance speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the history of the public radio tote bag, and why it’s become so identified with NPR and fundraising.

While tote bags may be the most associated with public radio fundraising, NPR does have an array of merchandise people can get for their support.

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