TED Radio Hour

Saturdays at 2pm & Sundays at 7pm
Guy Raz

An idea is the one gift that you can hang onto even after you've given it away. Welcome to TED Radio Hour hosted by Guy Raz – a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create.

Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life.

TED Radio Hour is a co-production of NPR and TED.

Genre: 

Podcasts

  • Thursday, October 30, 2014 11:03pm

    In this hour, TED speakers question whether we can experience the world more deeply by not only extending our senses — but going beyond them. Color blind artist Neil Harbisson can "hear" colors, even those beyond the range of sight. Physician and engineer Todd Kuiken builds prosthetic arms that connect with the human nervous system — improving motion, control and even feeling. Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can’t speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies who they are. Sound expert Julian Treasure says we are losing our listening in a louder world. He shares ways to re-tune our ears for conscious listening — to other people and the world around us.   

  • Friday, October 24, 2014 3:03pm

    In this hour, TED speakers explore our origins as a species — who we are, where we come from, where we’re headed — and how we’re connected to everything that came before us. Geneticist Spencer Wells describes how he uses DNA samples to trace our individual origins going back 2,000 generations. David Christian explains the history of the universe from the Big Bang, and how humans occupy little more than a millisecond on that cosmic timeline. Paleontologist Jack Horner explains what dinosaurs tell us about our own origins and what we can learn by attempting to revive a piece of the past. Louise Leakey describes her and her family’s long search for early human remains in Africa, and how unlocking that mystery is the key to understanding our survival as a species. Geneticist Spencer Wells returns to tell the story of early humans, and our eventual migration from Africa. Juan Enriquez argues that human evolution is far from over — homo sapiens are becoming a new species right before our eyes.

  • Thursday, October 16, 2014 11:03pm

    Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y, or the Me Generation, one thing's for certain: today's generation of young people will change the world. But how different is this hyper-connected generation from its predecessors? And what will be its legacy? In this hour, we hear from TED speakers searching to define themselves and their generation. Demographer Neil Howe coined the term “Millennial” in 1991, and offers perspective on the now-loaded term. Activist Natalie Warne calls on young people to find their passion, chase after it, and not let age stop them from changing the world. Psychologist Meg Jay tells twentysomethings how to reclaim adulthood before it’s too late. Charlie Hoehn explains how he built a career on his own terms at the height of the economic recession. YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca describes how this generation is using technology to warp the way we consume media. And teenager and RookieMag.com editor-in-chief Tavi Gevinson talks about the need for an unapologetically uncertain, complex idea of feminism for today's teenage girls.

  • Thursday, October 9, 2014 11:33pm

    Visions of the future don’t just have to come from science fiction. There’s very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future be like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how our future lives might look. Technology leader Nicholas Negroponte looks back on predictions he made in 1984, with surprising accuracy. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon says in the future, we’ll be able to grow replacement organs. Entrepreneur Richard Resnick says faster genome sequencing will revolutionize how we treat disease. Global security consultant Marc Goodman explains how advancing technology will change how we fight crime. GPS expert Todd Humphreys forecasts the future of geo-locators and how it will change our notions of privacy. Also, Sebastian Thrun says we will see more driverless cars on the road in the next decade, and soon traffic jams and accidents will be a thing of the past.

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 10:53pm

    Everyone wants to be creative. But channeling your creative impulses is no small feat. Is creativity something you are born with or can you learn it? In this hour, TED speakers examine the mystery of creativity. After a nasty bout of writer’s block that stretched on for nearly a decade, Sting found inspiration by channeling the stories of the shipyard workers he knew from his childhood. What happens in the brain during musical improv? Researcher Charles Limb scanned the brains of jazz musicians to find out. Sir Ken Robinson makes a case for creating an education system that nurtures — rather than stifles — creativity. Writer Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses.