Aspen City Council

Elise Thatcher

History was made last night when the majority of Aspenites changed the city’s home rule charter, stripping power away from elected officials. Referendum 1, also known as “Keep Aspen, Aspen” passed by a slim margin of 53% to 47%. The ballot count came in at 1297 to 1141 votes Tuesday night.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen voters re-elected their mayor and kept a city council member. A second council seat is to be determined. It was a night of awkward moments, as incumbent Mayor Steve Skadron once again bested Torre. The two went toe to toe in a runoff two years ago. This time, Skadron won handily, by about 400 votes.

Elise Thatcher

UPDATE - 11:21pm

Unofficial final results - Steve Skadron will keep his seat as Mayor against his second challenge from Torre. Skadron takes the win by about 400 votes.  

Carolyn Sackariason

If a governmental entity wants to build in Aspen's city limits, they have to get a review in 60 days. But that fast track does not apply to building projects by the City of Aspen. Confused? Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher explains.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

City Council incumbent Adam Frisch is at the head of the pack, when it comes to raising money for this spring election, and keeping his Council seat. Frisch raised more than $8,000 from April 10th to April 28th. That’s almost twice of the runner up, Mick Ireland.

Roger Adams

Steve Skadron is hoping to hang on to the mayor’s seat in Aspen. He has one challenger in the May election but says his proven leadership will earn him votes. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Skadron has served two terms on council. This would be his second term as mayor. He runs a marketing business and has lived in town for two decades. He says he’s pursuing re-election as a commitment to public service.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

We saw the end of the 2014-15 ski season when Aspen Mountain closed last weekend but why was it a ghost town at the base?

The City of Aspen just bought more wind power so it can operate on 100 percent renewable energy.

Meanwhile, the switch for the largest solar array in the valley was flipped this week.

The town of Snowmass is investigating why high levels of fecal matter are testing positive in a stream near a high-profile hotel.

Elise Thatcher

Candidates for Aspen’s City Council met for another forum last night. It focused on issues that are key for many to residents in their 20s, 30s and 40s. Six contenders perched on bar chairs and answered questions in the Sky Hotel. Most were about affordable housing and how to develop better job opportunities in the community.

In anticipation of a ballot question getting passed this spring, developers are busy getting their land use applications on file in City Hall. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Land use planners who represent Aspen property owners say Referendum 1 is spurring them to file development applications earlier than expected. If passed, the citizen ballot initiative would amend the City Charter to require a public vote on development projects with exceptions for height, size, parking, or affordable housing.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

Glenwood Springs swears-in two new city council members.

Pitkin County judges rule on three high profile cases.

Ballots go in the mail to voters for Aspen’s spring election.

As the Aspen chamber of commerce comes under fire for a campaign.

We’ll find out which candidates in the Aspen race have raised the most money so far.

Questions are raised about the main affordable housing program in the Upper Valley.

We hear from a Forest Service District ranger about controlled burns.

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