Aspen Police Department

City considers suing Precise over parking scam

May 11, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

  Aspen’s multi-year parking scam may not be resolved. The city is considering suing to get back some of the money it lost. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Officials claim they were lied to by the company that sold them the pay stations. The city’s parking department thought the company, Precise Park, was flagging debit cards with zero balances when they were processed the end of each day. Randy Ready is assistant city manager.

The teenager whose arrest involved a controversial take down by police was sentenced today to a year of supervised probation.

The charges of underage possession of marijuana and resisting arrest, which the boy pleaded guilty to last month, will be dismissed if the Aspen High School junior stays clean and out of trouble for a year.

Several conditions were attached to the sentencing, including routine testing for alcohol and marijuana, writing a letter of apology to the police officer who arrested him, attending school and possibly counseling.

The Aspen Police Department is experiencing a significant exodus of patrol officers this spring. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the story.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The Obama administration is requiring oil and gas companies to disclose what’s in their fracking fluid. How is that going to shake out in Garfield County?

Did a town hall meeting hosted by this station on the controversial and confusing charter amendment known as “Keep Aspen Aspen” shed light on the issue enough that voters are convinced one way or the other?

Meanwhile, down in Carbondale a woman who used to co-own a NBA basketball team is suing the IRS for $21 million.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Residents in the Mid-Valley saw federal agents in tactical gear this week. We’ll tell you why.

A police officer involved in a controversial arrest of an Aspen teenager says he’s leaving the department.

Proponents and opponents of a ballot measure to change Aspen’s land use code sound off at a town hall meeting.

A beloved restaurant in Aspen will keep its doors open longer than expected.

And, a popular Aspen bike-sharing program wants to expand its reach.

The Aspen Police officer who came under fire last month for aggressively arresting a high school student on suspicion of marijuana possession is leaving the department. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

Good afternoon, welcome to Mountain Edition.

Bus drivers in the Roaring Fork Valley vote to unionize.

Aspen law enforcement is violating a no-idling ordinance.

A Carbondale man accused of murdering his wife appears in court.

An Aspen teenager pleads guilty to pot-related charges.

A major employer in Garfield County announces layoffs.

High profile fatalities in Garfield County highlight a problem with domestic violence.

A more detailed avalanche report is out, about the accident that killed a long time Aspen local.

Law enforcement agencies in Aspen have been breaking a law that’s been on the books for 23 years, or at least the spirit of it. As Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports, the law is meant to limit pollution.

If you walk by the offices of the Aspen Police or Pitkin County Sheriff on any given night, you might notice the sounds and smells of idling car engines.

YouTube/Lauren Glendenning

The attorney who represents the teenager who was taken down forcefully in Aspen last month believes the police officer did not have probable cause to arrest him. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Instead of fighting the charges of underage marijuana possession and resisting arrest on the argument that Aspen Police officer Adam Loudon didn’t have probable cause to handcuff the high school student, he pleaded guilty on Monday.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

After a brutal car accident, a Carbondale man confesses to killing his wife. A homicide investigation is underway.

An Aspen teenager appears in court after a controversial arrest.

And that arrest sheds light on a radio communication problem for law enforcement around the Aspen schools.

Rafting companies praise the idea of a national monument along the popular Arkansas River.

The City of Aspen starts cutting down trees to fix a leaky parking garage.

Pages