Aspen School District

Residents vote for change on the boards that represent Carbondale’s emergency services and a mid-valley park district.

New test results show third graders in the Roaring Fork Valley are better at reading than the statewide average.

A state senator wraps up her time under the gold dome in Denver.

And oil and gas proponents voice strong support for continuing to drill in Garfield County.

We’ll let you know what to expect for the upcoming Aspen Music Festival and School summer season.

And we get a taste of what Aspen middle and high school band students learned this year from a long-time jazz musician. 

Marci Krivonen

The music department at the Aspen School District is growing, despite the odds. The budget for music is minimal compared to schools in other states. Last week though, the school welcomed its first ever musician in residence who taught middle and high school students jazz. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen visited band practice and filed this report.

Band practice is in full swing on a Wednesday afternoon. Students with saxophones, trumpets and drums tap their feet as the piece they’re playing reaches a crescendo.

Marci Krivonen

Environmental education is expanding in schools across the Roaring Fork Valley. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies grew its teaching programs over the last two years to include schools like Basalt Elementary and Carbondale’s Crystal River Elementary school. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, studies show schools with environmental programs score higher on standardized tests.

Environmental educator Melanie Poole instructs a group of kindergarten students plopped down in a semi-circle. Today’s lesson is about duck adaptations.

Jace Conflenti, an Aspen local and recent graduate of Aspen High School, spent time at the Aspen Youth Center while in middle and high school. He is now in his first year at the University of Colorado and works as a staff member during his summer and winter breaks from school. Conflenti shares stories of his time at AYC, both as a kid and now, as a staff member.  Executive Director Keith Berglund also joins in this episode of Non-Profit in the Spotlight. To learn more about the Aspen Youth Center, visit their website

Marci Krivonen

Now that recreational marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older, some parents of young kids are concerned. Law enforcement and school officials say legalization has led many kids to see marijuana as benign.  Some parents also fear with legal pot now for sale, it will be easier for their kids to get. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Parent Jillian Livingston’s son is preparing to enter high school next year.

"I feel like there’s a lot of questions. I feel like he is in the middle of this new evolution and I think that we have to be educated," she said.

Located in the Aspen Recreation Center, the Aspen Youth Center has provided over 5,000 children a place to call their own. The non-profit has open doors to all children in grades 4 - 12 during after school hours and school vacations. Maureen Sharaf, President of the AYC Board of Directors, and Keith Berglund, Executive Director, discuss the center's challenges and the overall importance of the center for the Aspen community. 

The Aspen Youth Center is a big part of childhood in Aspen, almost every child in the Aspen School District, dating as far back as the 1980's, has had some encounter with the youth center. Longtime board-member and Aspen local, Sue Smedstad, shares the history of the youth center and the different forms the center has taken since it was first conceptualized in the 1960's. Aspen Youth Center Executive Director, Keith Berglund, also joins.

To learn more about the Aspen Youth Center, visit their website.   

Welcome to Valley Roundup, for Friday 12-6-2013, a review of the week’s top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond.  Andy Stone and Curtis Wackerle join us this week. 

Downvalley some residents of a trailer park in Basalt who are facing relocation have organized to take the issue public

Garfield county Sheriff Lou Valerio says his fight with the state over new gun laws will continue

Aspen gets vocal about snow polo and the Aspen School District scrambles to fill a 2.9 million dollar budget shortfall.

On the Download with Rob St. Mary, a moving tribute to a young Colorado artist who died last month in Ouray.

Its all on today’s Valley Roundup.

Weather Closures

Dec 4, 2013
Rob St. Mary

* Aspen and Roaring Fork Public Schools are closed.

* The Garfield RE-2 School District that covers Rifle, Silt and New Castle is closed.

* All Colorado Mountain College campuses from Rifle to Aspen are closed today. That includes CMC learning locations in Rifle, the Glenwood Center, Carbondale, Spring Valley and Aspen. For more information, please call your local campus. The college's Central Services administrative offices in downtown Glenwood Springs remain open.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Univers beeldbank

This week, Governor John Hickenlooper enthusiastically supported Amendment 66, calling it the single most important education reform initiative in the history of the United States. School districts in the Roaring Fork Valley are also weighing in on the measure.  Hyperbole aside, the amendment would change the way the state funds public schools. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, school administrators aren’t the only groups sharing opinions before voters head to the polls in November.

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