Basalt

It’s election time and we’re taking a look at issues on the November ballot and what they could mean for a voter’s tax bill. First, there’s a statewide income tax increase for public schools.

And, there’s a local proposal to build a rec center in the Mid-Valley. Supporters say will enhance the community, while critics say it would mean hundreds more in property taxes for homeowners.

Basalt residents are being asked to redevelop land along the Roaring Fork River. The plan forces out more than a hundred people from a trailer park.

Finally, we’ll hear the latest weather forecast for the coming winter… there’s good news, and bad news.

discoveryspringtexas.com

 We’ve reported this week, starting Monday October 21st, on the various tax increases proposed in measures in next month’s election.  If all of them and Amendment 66 pass it could be one of the most expensive recent elections for many mid-valley voters.  The question is how expensive

Mid-Valley Recreation Center?

Oct 21, 2013
Crown Mountain Recreation District

  This week we are looking at the various tax increase questions before voters next month.  One of the largest projects in the valley seeking voter approval is the proposed recreation center in Basalt.  The indoor facility would be built in the Crown Mountain Park. Aspen Public Radio's Roger Adams reports.

“For me, I think it’s a great amenity, I think its an amenity for everyone who lives here and I think it’s the next step in the progression of any community.”

The U.S. Department of Justice has announced it won’t try and stop Colorado and Washington State from allowing recreational marijuana.

Basalt officials say they’re on track to move nearly forty families living in a trailer park. It’s part of a redevelopment plan… and some of the families say they can’t afford to stay in Basalt.

We’ll find out what the reaction in Aspen was to the USA Pro Challenge, which took over parts of the Upper Valley last week.

And, what the latest is on what cycling officials are doing to catch doping… turns out they don’t necessarily agree with each other.

A Glenwood Springs teacher is teaming up with NOAA to chart the ocean floor. She sets sail early next month.

An accomplished local author is taking readers across the world. Her latest novel will be published soon. It chronicles an early feminist in the 19th century Ottoman Empire.

And, The Colorado State Fair continues in Pueblo through the weekend… we have an audio postcard.

Farther down valley, the Basalt Police Department is still trying to reach someone who may have been one of the last people to see a man who died in Basalt last month. Daniel Perez Mejia was found in late May in a ditch near Big O Tires in Basalt. Police say Mejia got off a bus operated by the Roaring Fork Transit Authority late in the evening on Saturday, May 25th. There was another man who got off the bus at the same time.

Boosting Business in Basalt

May 16, 2013
Roger Adams

The apparent early success of Whole Foods Market in Basalt is drawing new attention to the Willits development.  Already some businesses have relocated to Willits from downtown Basalt as the foot traffic there grows.  For some this presents a challenge to downtown where merchants are brainstorming ways to attract more visitors their way.  Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams explains.

Elise Thatcher

It’s easy to not think about wildfires just yet. But local officials in the Roaring Fork Valley are working together to make sure you’re getting ready for fire season. Fire departments, the red cross, and other emergency services are trying out a way of getting the word out. It’s part of a new national and international effort, to make it easier for people to understand how to get ready for--and survive--wildfire season. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher went to the first meeting in the series, to find out what’s new this year.

Marci Krivonen

The Roaring Fork Valley is no Silicon Valley. But, it is home to a growing innovative computer tech company. The Basalt-basediOmounts designs and distributes sturdy stands to hold smart phones and tablets. The company does most of its business online and has furnished local lodges, like the Hotel Jerome, with its products.

Turns out, iOmounts isn’t the only business of its kind in Colorado. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

 

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