Bureau of Land Management

Courtesy of coloradowildpubliclands.org

The nonprofit Colorado Wild and Public Lands is suing the federal government over a land exchange. It’s the latest step in years of debate over the Sutey property.

http://gardner.house.gov/

The U.S. Senate is scheduled to consider repealing an Obama-era regulation on methane emissions Wednesday. Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner is reportedly still undecided.

Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management

Last week, the Bureau of Land Management completed a long-debated land exchange with the billionaire Wexner family. The federal agency traded nearly 1,500 acres of land near the base of Mount Sopris for two properties totaling 670 acres of once-private land that is close to popular recreation areas in Carbondale. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the development and spoke with producer Christin Kay about the deal.

 

Courtesy of U.S. Department of the Interior

Last month, Congressional Republicans made initial moves to repeal a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) rule aimed at reducing methane emissions from oil and gas development. This BLM regulation is modeled, in part, after a state law in Colorado. News director Carolyn Sackariason sat down with environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy to talk about how such a repeal would affect Coloradans.

Courtesy of coloradowildpubliclands.org

The citizen group Colorado Wild and Public Lands has won a request to delay the closing of a controversial land exchange.

Public land near Carbondale will go into private holdings this week.

savethethompsondivide.org

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined Gov. John Hickenlooper at the state capitol Thursday to announce a decision that protects the Thompson Divide, but leaves other areas open to drilling.

savethethompsondivide.org

Pitkin County commissioners approved spending an additional $85,000 on preservation efforts in Thompson Divide on Tuesday.

Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management released environmental information this week about potential oil and gas development in northwest Colorado.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Representatives from the Western Energy Alliance, which represents over 300 oil and gas companies in the western United States, are praising election victories by Republican candidates Donald Trump and Scott Tipton. Environmental groups fear impacts from expanded development. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy spoke with the Western Energy Alliance’s Kathleen Sgamma about potential effects of this election on the oil and gas industry.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will offer 31 oil and gas leases for sale this December, but these sales will happen online.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

For years, the nonprofit, EcoFlight, has been flying politicians, journalists and concerned citizens over a pristine corridor outside of Carbondale that’s being eyed by oil and gas companies for drilling. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has released a plan for the area that has both industry and environmental groups wanting more. Aspen Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stewart-Severy recently flew over the Thompson Divide and has this report.  

Aspen Public Radio News

The Bureau of Land Management released a plan Friday to cancel 25 oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide area near Carbondale. Local groups, including Wilderness Workshop and the Thompson Divide Coalition, said in statements that canceling those leases helps to protect wildlife, land and public water supplies.

Marci Krivonen

  Oil and gas companies are deciding how to respond to the BLM’s expected decision about leases on the Thompson Divide. The West Slope Colorado Oil and Gas Association is working with about eight companies directly affected by a pending BLM decision.

Comments are in for BLM oil and gas leases

Jan 8, 2016
Elise Thatcher

  The BLM is sorting through tens of thousands of comments on what to do about certain oil and gas leases. The 65 leases include 25 on the Thompson Divide.

Colorado Trout Unlimited

The Bureau of Land Management is deciding what to do with dozens of oil and gas leases, including some on the Thompson Divide. The agency finished a series of public meetings this week to find out what residents want.

BLM considers canceling Thompson Divide leases

Nov 18, 2015
Marci Krivonen

The Bureau of Land Management is open to canceling more than half of the undeveloped oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide. The leases in question are for Forest Service land but the BLM manages the mineral rights underneath. The BLM is reviewing the environmental impacts of what can be done with those leases, and has released the list of management options.

Marci Krivonen

The Forest Service was met by protesters Tuesday (9/2/15) in a remote area in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. The agency is starting a review of a proposal to drill an exploratory well. But, the group gathered doesn’t want any natural gas drilling. They say the area’s natural environment is too valuable. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s tough to imagine coming up here for anything other than peaceful moments in the great outdoors. But about 40 people Tuesday maneuvered mud-caked roads to protest drilling. Some even slept over.

EcoFlight

The Pitkin County Commissioners are unhappy with what they’ve seen so far in a BLM plan for existing oil and gas leases on the Thompson Divide. They’re crafting a letter to the agency. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Pitkin County gets an early look at the BLM’s preliminary draft Environmental Impact Statement because it’s a cooperating agency. A public version will be released in November. It’ll decide what to do with more than two dozen undeveloped oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Pitkin County wants the leases canceled.

Facebook/Rachel Richards

In June the Pitkin County Commissioners sent a resolution to Colorado’s congressional delegation, decrying a national effort to transfer federal lands to state ownership. Advocates say it would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and BLM. Commissioner Rachel Richards told Marci Krivonen the effort would spell trouble for Pitkin County.

Rachel Richards is a Pitkin County Commissioner. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. In future weeks, we’ll air the other side of the argument.

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