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Carbondale

Artists bringing local flair to events this weekend

Jul 24, 2015

Two festivals this weekend attract proprietors from all over the country, but two valley residents are bringing their local style to the scene.

Crystal Theatre owners reflect after 30 years

Jul 14, 2015

The Crystal Theatre in Carbondale has been a staple of the Roaring Fork Valley for three decades. Bob and Kathy Ezra have owned the theatre since the beginning. It made it through tough economic times and a changing movie industry by showing the films they like and without any previews.

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Carbondale center for veterans looks for a new home

Jun 15, 2015
Creative Commons/Flickr/North Charleston

A veterans center that opened in Carbondale’s Third Street Center a year ago is already looking for a new home. Though some vets have been helped with things like housing and employment, more vets may use it if it was in Glenwood Springs. That’s according to Michael Conniff. He’s with the Western Slope Veterans Coalition and spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Michael Conniff is with the Western Slope Veterans Association, an organization that’s looking for a new home in Glenwood for it’s veterans center. They hope to announce a new space in July. 

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County elected leaders are sending a letter to Colorado’s congressional delegation, urging them to support an effort that would preserve the Thompson Divide. One county staffer calls it “the most promising proposal to date.”

Elise Thatcher

CenturyLink is investigating who the perpetrator was that caused thousands of its Roaring Fork Valley customers to not have cellular, landline or internet service for more than 16 hours on Tuesday and Wednesday.  

On Tuesday night, Carbondale Town Trustees considered yet another aspect of marijuana in the midvalley. They approved $20,000 for the Roaring Fork School District for mental health counseling, and to educate kids and parents about pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with with the District’s Chief Academic Officer, Rob Stein.

Elise Thatcher

Carbondale’s marijuana industry is growing, and once again, the Doctor’s Garden is at the forefront. In 2014, the business opened the first retail marijuana store in the Roaring Fork Valley. Now, a new branch of that business has gotten the go-ahead to extract marijuana oil and make edibles with it.

Hamilton Pevec

Former Carbondale resident Hamilton Pevec is in the middle of the aid effort in Nepal. After the country’s second major earthquake, he and his wife, Devika, are going back out to villages where people are trying to recover. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Pevec.

Grayson Schaffer

Glenwood Springs is a contender for being one of Outside magazine’s best towns. Such listings can be music to the ears of town promoters, but can also increase the demand for local resources, like housing. As Aspen Public Radio is reporting this month, the lack of rental housing in the Roaring Fork Valley is having a significant effect on locals. Jonah Ogles is Senior Editor with Outside Magazine, and talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says Outside often gets criticism for listing communities as desirable.

Marci Krivonen

This month an art gallery in Aspen is filled with photos of mentors involved with the non profit Buddy Program. The “Men in Mentoring” installation is meant to get guys interested in becoming role models for a long wait-list of boys needing guidance. The need is particularly acute in the Mid-Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Ryan Larkin and his pal Jacob drill screws into the lemonade stand they’re making. The two are decades apart in age, but work together like old friends.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The smells of legalization permeate up and down the valley, and the odor of marijuana has some people plugging their noses and complaining to city officials.

An investigation is brewing around a nonprofit in Glenwood and whether funds were misappropriated.

Meanwhile, there’s more debate on oil and gas drilling in the valley.

Film on Carbondale's James Surls Opens ShortsFest

Apr 6, 2015

This year’s annual Aspen Film’s Shorts Fest features several documentaries on Colorado artists. One called “The Journey” follows sculptor James Surls. Austin Lottimer is co-director of the film. He spoke recently to Aspen Public Radio’s Rob St. Mary.

Band of Heathens

Apr 5, 2015

The Band of Heathens is an Austin, Texas ensemble that has built a fierce fan base due to musical and lyrical depth coupled with outstanding songcraft.

On this episode of "Check 1, 2", host Daniel Shaw catches up with Band of Heathens at the PAC3 in Carbondale. You’ll hear both live and studio tracks from the band’s latest outing, “Sunday Morning Record”, as well as covers from the group’s sound check.

Colorado Bureau of Investigation

A suspect arrested for first degree murder and domestic violence in an alleged homicide in Carbondale was taken to jail on Wednesday.

Arturo Navarrete-Portillo was released from a Grand Junction hospital and transported to the Garfield County Jail, where he’s being held without bond. The Carbondale man is charged in the death of his wife, Maria Carminda Portillo-Amaya, who was found with knife wounds in an apartment on February 16th.

Scott Davidson/Flickr/Creative Commons

On February 10th, law enforcement responded to a domestic violence call at a residence near Parachute. They discovered a woman whose face was bloodied from being struck repeatedly. Later, the suspect - her husband - was shot to death by authorities after a high speed chase on Interstate 70. The fatal incident was one of two in Garfield County in February, where domestic violence played a role. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the problem of domestic violence is growing in parts of our region.

Molly Dorais is the Director of Admissions at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. She discusses the school's unique curriculum and programs, and the types of students who attend CRMS. The school is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization, so tuition goes directly into the school's programs, faculty, and facilities. While the price tag might shock prospective students and their families, Dorais discusses CRMS's generous financial aid program. 

To learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, visit www.crms.org

Your Evening News - February 5th, 2015

Feb 5, 2015

Carbondale Fire District Hires Former Board Member To Do Consulting

Carbondale’s Fire department is hiring three consultants to help the district get back on track. The Carbondale and Rural Fire Protection District is dealing with a rapidly dwindling budget. One of the consultants hired is a former fire board member who lost in the most recent board election.

Group For LGBTQ Teens Ramps Up In Roaring Fork Valley

Feb 3, 2015
Creative Commons/Flickr/Philippa Willitts

An Aspen charity focused on reducing the number of suicides in our region is expanding its reach. The Aspen Hope Center is holding a support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning teenagers. According to its organizers, the group, called I am Me is the first of its kind in the Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Hope Center Executive Director Michelle Muething realized LGBTQ teenagers needed support after several came to the organization for help.

The Colorado Rocky Mountain School's 60-year history is chock-full of interesting characters - people who believe work in the classroom should be coupled with physical work and outdoor education. The end result: a curious, knowledgeable, and well-rounded 18-year old. Mark Clark started his journey with CRMS in 1979. He is a CRMS faculty member and splits his time between Carbondale and Wyoming. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org.   

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