climate change

Renowned tropical ecologist Thomas Lovejoy discusses his half-century of research in the Amazon  basin from the first non-indigenous navigation of the world’s biggest river , to issues of possible die-back today.

Image via bagheera.com

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is hosting Dr. Thomas Lovejoy in a lecture this evening focusing on his 30 years of research as a conservation biologist. Lovejoy’s work has earned him the title, “godfather of biodiversity” and experts say his findings are key for understanding global warming.

Elise Thatcher

  Eagle County Commissioners are getting together to talk about big issues, and they want to do that in the Roaring Fork Valley. Housing, climate change, and early childhood development are the first topics for what are being called “Community Conversations.”

Aspen Global Change Institute

When it comes to impacts from climate change, communities across the world are in trouble. That’s according to a Portugal-based professor of Environmental Psychology. Jose Palma spoke in Aspen about how communities must become more resilient. He told Marci Krivonen ecosystems are increasingly vulnerable and societies are stressed, and less able to handle change.

Jose Palma is with the University of Lisbon. He gave a public lecture Wednesday on behalf of the Aspen Global Change Institute.

Website details how climate change will alter forests

Nov 11, 2015
forestforecasts.org

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site, forestforecasts.org.

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”

Aspen Skiing Company

Before the chairlifts start turning, the Aspen Skiing Company is providing a glimpse of how the upcoming season is shaping up. Company executives talked about the business outlook and efforts to combat climate change during a presentation to the Pitkin County commissioners Tuesday (10/20). Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen Skiing Company President and CEO Mike Kaplan began the hour-long presentation with a weather forecast.

Facebook/Roaring Fork Conservancy

Water officials are presenting a final Roaring Fork Regional Water Efficiency Plan this week. The Pitkin County commissioners will hear how water can be conserved ahead of increased demand.

Work on the water efficiency plan began in 2012, when the Roaring Fork Valley was experiencing drought. Major water providers from Aspen to Glenwood Springs joined an effort to plan for a drier future.

Expert to speak in Aspen about urbanization

Oct 12, 2015
Aspen Global Change Institute

 

An expert in urbanization and land use change is speaking in Aspen Tuesday. She has advice for land use planners in Aspen.

 

Karen Seto is a professor at Yale. She studies why cities are growing, how they grow and how their growth impacts the environment. People are moving to cities at a more rapid pace than ever before. And, urban areas generate three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions. She says urbanization increases demand for resources.

 

Gov. Hickenlooper supports Obama's Climate Action Plan

Aug 10, 2015
Marci Krivonen

A discussion at the Aspen Institute Monday (8/10) featuring Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper touched on a range of issues: foreign policy, teen pregnancy, marijuana and climate change. 

On climate change, Hickenlooper says it’s important to have clean air at high altitude. He supports President Obama’s Climate Action Plan and intends to enact it in Colorado.

Texas Tech University

A renowned climate scientist spoke in Aspen Tuesday about connecting the global challenge of climate change to local response. Katharine Hayhoe spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen about how climate change impacts Aspen and, the controversial White House plan announced Monday to cut carbon emissions.

aspenpitkin.com

Aspen City Council is getting behind a national effort to address climate change. On Monday council gave initial support for what’s called a “Carbon Fee and Dividend” proposal. 

In June seven Roaring Fork Valley residents, including an Aspen city staffer, traveled to Washington DC to sway elected officials to support the Carbon Fee and Dividend policy proposal. It would apply a fee to carbon-based fuels. Revenues from the fee would be returned to households across the country.

Featured speakers: Kathryn Sullivan, Andrew Revkin

 While the basics of greenhouse-driven global warming are clear, translating these into specific local and regional impacts remains challenging — including how warm it will get and what will happen to regional weather patterns, particularly precipitation. 

themountainpact.org

A group of Western towns known as the “Mountain Pact” are sending a letter to Washington DC this week, urging lawmakers to hold the coal industry accountable. The group wants royalty payments from coal to fund efforts by communities to adapt to climate change. The City of Aspen is part of the Mountain Pact. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Ashley Perl, who’s working on the effort for the city of Aspen.

Ashley Perl is the Director of the City of Aspen’s Canary Initiative. 

EPA Head: Climate Change An "Economic Issue" For Aspen

Jan 22, 2015
Marci Krivonen

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told a small crowd in Aspen Thursday that action on climate change is needed now. Administrator Gina McCarthy timed her visit with the Winter X Games, to reach a younger crowd.

McCarthy’s visit was in conjunction with Protect Our Winters, a climate change advocacy group led by snow sports athletes. Standing next to the ski gondola, McCarthy emphasized how action on climate change is critical to economies like Aspen’s.

Mountain Edition - January 22nd, 2015

Jan 22, 2015

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Winter X Games are once again in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley.

Officials try to shed light on a lack of childcare in our region.

A major landowner in Aspen is asking elected leaders for an extension for one of his development proposals.

Aspen’s Police Chief reports back from a statewide conference about pot and public safety

And a troubled Carbondale elementary school will need a new principal next year.

Officials in Garfield County get an update on an oil and gas study.

And doctors in Glenwood Springs are lending a hand with radon testing.

Aspen’s mayor heads to Washington.

And we stop by a long running nordic ski area in the Mid Valley.

Your Evening News - January 20th, 2015

Jan 20, 2015

Mark Hunt to Take Aspen’s Questions at Public Forum

The man who controls the majority of buildings in downtown Aspen will speak publicly for the first time to the community on his future plans. Aspen Business Events is hosting a question-and-answer session with Mark Hunt. Along with investors, Hunt has amassed 15 buildings in the commercial core and has invested more than $100 million in real estate in the city. The event will take place on Thursday at 5pm at BB’s Kitchen. Two Hunt proposals for low-cost hotels go before the Aspen City Council on Monday.

Your Morning News - January 20th, 2015

Jan 20, 2015

Aspen Mayor to Talk Climate Change at National Conference

Aspen mayor Steve Skadron is heading to Washington at the end of the week to talk to other U.S. mayors about preparing for a changed climate.

Climate resiliency planning is one of Aspen City Council’s top ten goals. The City commissioned a study to examine what kinds of changes are in store for the resort town. The temperature is expected to increase and the number of frost-free days will rise.

Aspen has also worked to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions through the Canary Initiative. Mayor Steve Skadron says he plans to share Aspen’s progress.

“The work we’ve done to this point will be recognized as some of the most aggressive out there. That’s the message I want to put forth to my fellow mayors, that if a community like ours can address this, there’s opportunities for other communities, as well.”

The two-day meeting is called the Mayor’s Innovation Project and “integrating climate resilience into city decisions” is one of four main topics the mayors will discuss.

Mountain Edition - January 8th, 2015

Jan 8, 2015

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The upper Roaring Fork Valley saw a dramatic rescue this week, after three elk fell into an icy pond.

A local ski guide gets caught in an avalanche; it’s a reminder that avalanche season is in full-swing.

A new climate report shows Aspen has seen temperatures warm over the last several decades.

Much larger fines are looming for oil and gas companies who don’t follow the law.

And, Basalt inches closer to deciding how to redevelop parts of downtown.

Your Morning News - January 7th, 2015

Jan 7, 2015

New Healthcare Enrollment Numbers

More than 3,000 people in Pitkin, Garfield, and Eagle counties have signed up for private health insurance since November 15th.

3,330 residents of the three counties signed up between November 15th and December 15th. That’s for health care coverage starting in 2015 according to the online health insurance marketplace, Connect for Health. Megan Burch is overseeing the effort to help residents in the Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle County sign up for health insurance.

“We’re really thrilled with the enrollment numbers to date, and they’re tracking very closely to our goals for this second enrollment period.”

The difference is Garfield County is about seven hundred people short of that overall goal. So Burch’s office is planning more outreach and events there to help residents sign up for health insurance.

Your Evening News - January 6th, 2015

Jan 6, 2015

Climate Report: Temperatures Rising in Aspen

A new report on climate change in the Aspen area shows an increase in temperature and a rise in the number of frost-free days. The report was compiled as part of an effort to prepare the resort town for a changed climate.

The Climate Resiliency Plan looks at Aspen’s climate history. It shows Aspen saw a one-degree Fahrenheit increase from 1940 to 1979, and since 1980 a 1.5 degree increase. The report also shows a steady increase in the number of frost-free days. James Arnott with the Aspen Global Change Institute authored the report.

“This is one of the pointers that gets us to thinking about recreational seasons, such as a shortening of the winter and a lengthening of the summertime season.”

The plan pinpoints where Aspen may be vulnerable to climate change in the ski industry, for example. The report is a first step in an effort to engage community members in building a plan that finds ways to adapt to warming in the future.

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