climate change

Marci Krivonen

A discussion at the Aspen Institute Monday (8/10) featuring Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper touched on a range of issues: foreign policy, teen pregnancy, marijuana and climate change. 

On climate change, Hickenlooper says it’s important to have clean air at high altitude. He supports President Obama’s Climate Action Plan and intends to enact it in Colorado.

Texas Tech University

A renowned climate scientist spoke in Aspen Tuesday about connecting the global challenge of climate change to local response. Katharine Hayhoe spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen about how climate change impacts Aspen and, the controversial White House plan announced Monday to cut carbon emissions.

aspenpitkin.com

Aspen City Council is getting behind a national effort to address climate change. On Monday council gave initial support for what’s called a “Carbon Fee and Dividend” proposal. 

In June seven Roaring Fork Valley residents, including an Aspen city staffer, traveled to Washington DC to sway elected officials to support the Carbon Fee and Dividend policy proposal. It would apply a fee to carbon-based fuels. Revenues from the fee would be returned to households across the country.

Featured speakers: Kathryn Sullivan, Andrew Revkin

 While the basics of greenhouse-driven global warming are clear, translating these into specific local and regional impacts remains challenging — including how warm it will get and what will happen to regional weather patterns, particularly precipitation. 

themountainpact.org

A group of Western towns known as the “Mountain Pact” are sending a letter to Washington DC this week, urging lawmakers to hold the coal industry accountable. The group wants royalty payments from coal to fund efforts by communities to adapt to climate change. The City of Aspen is part of the Mountain Pact. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Ashley Perl, who’s working on the effort for the city of Aspen.

Ashley Perl is the Director of the City of Aspen’s Canary Initiative. 

Marci Krivonen

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told a small crowd in Aspen Thursday that action on climate change is needed now. Administrator Gina McCarthy timed her visit with the Winter X Games, to reach a younger crowd.

McCarthy’s visit was in conjunction with Protect Our Winters, a climate change advocacy group led by snow sports athletes. Standing next to the ski gondola, McCarthy emphasized how action on climate change is critical to economies like Aspen’s.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Winter X Games are once again in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley.

Officials try to shed light on a lack of childcare in our region.

A major landowner in Aspen is asking elected leaders for an extension for one of his development proposals.

Aspen’s Police Chief reports back from a statewide conference about pot and public safety

And a troubled Carbondale elementary school will need a new principal next year.

Officials in Garfield County get an update on an oil and gas study.

And doctors in Glenwood Springs are lending a hand with radon testing.

Aspen’s mayor heads to Washington.

And we stop by a long running nordic ski area in the Mid Valley.

Your Evening News - January 20th, 2015

Jan 20, 2015

Mark Hunt to Take Aspen’s Questions at Public Forum

The man who controls the majority of buildings in downtown Aspen will speak publicly for the first time to the community on his future plans. Aspen Business Events is hosting a question-and-answer session with Mark Hunt. Along with investors, Hunt has amassed 15 buildings in the commercial core and has invested more than $100 million in real estate in the city. The event will take place on Thursday at 5pm at BB’s Kitchen. Two Hunt proposals for low-cost hotels go before the Aspen City Council on Monday.

Your Morning News - January 20th, 2015

Jan 20, 2015

Aspen Mayor to Talk Climate Change at National Conference

Aspen mayor Steve Skadron is heading to Washington at the end of the week to talk to other U.S. mayors about preparing for a changed climate.

Climate resiliency planning is one of Aspen City Council’s top ten goals. The City commissioned a study to examine what kinds of changes are in store for the resort town. The temperature is expected to increase and the number of frost-free days will rise.

Aspen has also worked to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions through the Canary Initiative. Mayor Steve Skadron says he plans to share Aspen’s progress.

“The work we’ve done to this point will be recognized as some of the most aggressive out there. That’s the message I want to put forth to my fellow mayors, that if a community like ours can address this, there’s opportunities for other communities, as well.”

The two-day meeting is called the Mayor’s Innovation Project and “integrating climate resilience into city decisions” is one of four main topics the mayors will discuss.

Mountain Edition - January 8th, 2015

Jan 8, 2015

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The upper Roaring Fork Valley saw a dramatic rescue this week, after three elk fell into an icy pond.

A local ski guide gets caught in an avalanche; it’s a reminder that avalanche season is in full-swing.

A new climate report shows Aspen has seen temperatures warm over the last several decades.

Much larger fines are looming for oil and gas companies who don’t follow the law.

And, Basalt inches closer to deciding how to redevelop parts of downtown.

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