climate change

Your Morning News - January 7th, 2015

Jan 7, 2015

New Healthcare Enrollment Numbers

More than 3,000 people in Pitkin, Garfield, and Eagle counties have signed up for private health insurance since November 15th.

3,330 residents of the three counties signed up between November 15th and December 15th. That’s for health care coverage starting in 2015 according to the online health insurance marketplace, Connect for Health. Megan Burch is overseeing the effort to help residents in the Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle County sign up for health insurance.

“We’re really thrilled with the enrollment numbers to date, and they’re tracking very closely to our goals for this second enrollment period.”

The difference is Garfield County is about seven hundred people short of that overall goal. So Burch’s office is planning more outreach and events there to help residents sign up for health insurance.

Your Evening News - January 6th, 2015

Jan 6, 2015

Climate Report: Temperatures Rising in Aspen

A new report on climate change in the Aspen area shows an increase in temperature and a rise in the number of frost-free days. The report was compiled as part of an effort to prepare the resort town for a changed climate.

The Climate Resiliency Plan looks at Aspen’s climate history. It shows Aspen saw a one-degree Fahrenheit increase from 1940 to 1979, and since 1980 a 1.5 degree increase. The report also shows a steady increase in the number of frost-free days. James Arnott with the Aspen Global Change Institute authored the report.

“This is one of the pointers that gets us to thinking about recreational seasons, such as a shortening of the winter and a lengthening of the summertime season.”

The plan pinpoints where Aspen may be vulnerable to climate change in the ski industry, for example. The report is a first step in an effort to engage community members in building a plan that finds ways to adapt to warming in the future.

Marci Krivonen

It’s that time of year when ski resorts crank up snowmaking machines to bolster Mother Nature’s delivery. Some resorts depend on man-made snow more than others and it’s possible  the practice may be used more in the future. For Connecting the Drops, Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Your Evening News - November 26th, 2014

Nov 26, 2014

CDOT Extends Glenwood Bridge Comment Period 

If you have an opinion about the new Grand Avenue Bridge, now there’s another month to let officials know. The Colorado Department of Transportation has extended the comment period for the Glenwood Springs project.

CDOT has gotten a lot of feedback already about the proposal...specifically the Environmental Assessment released at the beginning of the month. Spokeswoman Tracy Truelove says at a recent public hearing, some people were asking for more time to consider the bridge replacement.

Your Morning News - November 26th, 2014

Nov 26, 2014

Ski Co and the 2015 Season

With the lifts already cranking on Aspen Mountain and a scheduled opening day Thursday at Snowmass, the Aspen Skiing Company is positive about the season ahead.

The Aspen Skiing Company is opening new terrain and new family amenities on three of its four mountains. Buttermilk may see the most change with a reconfigured base area, a remodeled Inn at Aspen and a new children’s center called “Hideout.” Mike Kaplan is President and CEO of the Skiing Company.

Mountain Edition - September 11th, 2014

Sep 11, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

So far it looks like the Roaring Fork Valley is holding off a nasty virus that’s raising concerns in Denver. 

Bears are causing some problems, we hear what police in Basalt are doing about it.

One of the visible leftover structures from the recession in the Upper Valley may disappear later this year.

And more people are showing interest in farming Pitkin county open space land.

Climate change reports are frequent-- we check on one about water in the Valley.

We’ll get the details on how Aspen’s airport could get quieter and say “goodbye” to long time airport director Jim Elwood.

Mead & Hunt, 2013 Fly Green/Fly Quiet Annual Report

There more newer, quieter private jets touching down in Aspen compared to ten years ago. That’s part of an ongoing, and unusual, effort by the airport to cut down on plane noise. And private pilots have played an important role.

ARE Day - Politics, Climate Change and History

Aug 13, 2014

The American Renewable Energy Day, or ARE day, continues in Aspen with a discussion called "Politics, Climate Change and History" featuring Tom Steyer (Investor, Philanthropist, NextGen Climate), Douglas Brinkley (Historian, Professor at Rice University), and Theodore Roosevelt IV (Barclays Bank).

Christmas Bird Count 2013

Dec 8, 2013
Roger Adams

Groups of people with binoculars will be counting wild birds next Sunday (12/15/2013.)  It is part of the annual Christmas Bird Count for the National Audubon Society.  This will be the 114th annual count and mark one of the largest and longest running citizen science efforts in the world.  APR’s Roger Adams reports.

  In the Upper Valley the count will take place inside of a defined area. 

“It’s a circle that we’re counting birds within.  Basically it’s a circle drawn on a map.”

Facebook/Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow

A Brooklyn-based author is exploring the effects of climate change on ski resorts from Europe to Montana and Colorado. Porter Fox wrote Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow. In it, Porter explores the lengthy history of skiing and talks to skiers and scientists around the world. He finds what he calls a “shocking truth,” that climate change could wipe out skiing over the next 75 years. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Porter.

Climate Change Measured on Open Spaces near Aspen

Nov 11, 2013
Marci Krivonen

In the future, the forests surrounding Aspen will look different. Already, mountain shrubs are replacing some Aspen stands and changing the complexion of the area.   This is likely due to due a warming climate.

Mountain Edition - November 7th, 2013

Nov 7, 2013

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

Flickr (Creative Commons)/Nurpu

In most years, summertime thunderstorms in Colorado give way to clear skies in mid-September. But, not this year. Colorado State Climatologist Nolan Doesken says one of the unique parts of the torrential rains that flooded the Front Range last week is the pattern. Storms bringing heavy rain simultaneously over multiple places. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with him about the storms.

Valley Roundup 8-23-2013

Aug 23, 2013

Welcome to Valley Roundup for Friday 8-23-2013, a review of the week’s top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley.

The big news story of this week came in on pedal power to the upper valley.  Year three of the USA Pro Cycling Challenge literally shut the place down on Monday afternoon.  By most accounts the race is a positive event…though it remains a tough sell for some.  We also discuss the big number of homes in Aspen that list their owners as corporations.  And, what would a review of the news be if we didn’t mention marijuana?  The retail sale of recreational marijuana is moving forward in fits and starts.

Also today one severe outlook on climate change sees an end to the global ski industry by century’s end.  We’ll talk with Porter Fox and editor at Powder magazine about his new book on climate change and the ski industry.

Climate Change and Conflict and the Media

Aug 9, 2013
Solomon Hsiang, et al / Science, 2013

ROGER ADAMS, HOST: Global temperatures on are the rise, and scientists predict that that will make for more extreme weather events—things like higher temperature spikes, drought, and more intense storms. And a team of researchers has made headlines by quantifying how much increased violence comes from extreme shifts in climate.

Aspen Public Radio’s science reporter Ellis Robinson, joins us on Valley Roundup. Hey Ellis.


The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy’s chief scientist will be speaking in Aspen Thursday. M. Sanjayan also contributes environmental reports to CBS News. In Aspen, he will talk about the role of conservation in improving human well-being, wildlife and the environment. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

M. Sanjayan is the lead scientist for the Nature Conservancy. He’s speaking at Peapcke Auditorium Thursday at 6:30pm. The event is being put on by the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies.

Kathleen Smith / Lawrence Livermore National Lab

You may have missed it, but last week national headlines read, “the CIA wants to control the weather.”  Those headlines came on the heels of the media learning the CIA was funding a report on geoengineering. It’s an idea that’s akin to a man-made thermostat for the globe.  Aspen Public Radio’s Science Reporter explains what geoengineering is, why you need to know about it, and why the CIA is involved.

Fear and Hope: Climate Change and Policy Solutions

Few people appreciate just how badly our society will suffer under likely climate change. We are on the verge of unleashing runaway changes, wherein nature’s forces accelerate the impacts of humanity’s emissions, and we get cascading, unstoppable change. This is important to understand, for we will leave an earth a far diminished place, with many parts unrecognizable. Avoiding such a fate is possible, but only with rapid, serious actions. Presenting climate dangers at length, and without an antidote, just leaves depression in the wake. An emerging story is positive: There are new technologies growing at an astounding pace that can reverse CO2 emissions trends. Recent developments in Germany, Denmark, and China and several US states show the potential. This story begins darkly, but transitions to a discovery of solutions that can help build a much more useful conversation on climate change.

Hal Harvey, James Fallows


A bill requiring rural electric cooperatives to use more renewable energy sources is

on its way to the State House. Senate Bill 252 narrowly passed the senate earlier this month, over objections by rural republicans and some cooperatives.


The legislation would increase the amount of renewables, like wind and solar, coops must use from the current 10 percent standard to 25 percent. If it passed, these electric groups would have to meet that mark by 2020. Lee Boughey of Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association says that's a difficult target.

Photo by Elise Thatcher

Most residents in the Roaring Fork Valley probably won’t be surprised to hear

there’s more snow in the mountains. Drought conditions are in the area again this year... but while the snow is helping... it’s cold temperatures that are making the biggest difference.

Wendy Ryan is with the Colorado Climate Center. She says the snowpack in the Roaring Fork Valley is at 87% of what’s normal.

"It’s way better than we had been just a few weeks ago, so April has brought us some really good moisture, mainly along the northern tier of the state."