Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Energy development in northwest Colorado cuts roads and brings traffic into prime wildlife habitat. Researcher George Wittemyer studies how such development impacts deer populations and will speak about his work as part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series this week.

Carolyn Sackariason

 Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The winter months are prime time for spotting coyotes, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) officials warn that the predators may become more aggressive in January and February.

Coyotes breed in the first months of the year. CPW officials say as the predators pair up to find space to have their young, they can become more territorial and hostile.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme present a compilation of the week’s news.

Topics include:

  • The City of Aspen works on reducing the volume of construction waste headed for the landfill

  • Organizers of the Aspen Ideas Festival gear up for next year’s gathering

  • Aspen Skiing Company’s workforce hits town

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission yesterday unanimously approved an experimental study to kill black bears and mountain lions in the Piceance Basin near Rifle.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission meets Wednesday to decide whether to kill more mountain lions and black bears near Rifle.

Courtesy of pitkincounty.com

The immensely popular Sky Mountain Park trails close Thursday for the winter season.

 

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails lead ranger Pryce Hadley said the closures are key to protecting wildlife, especially elk, during the most stressful season.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Colorado state parks are again joining a national movement to get people outside on Black Friday.

Entry to all 42 Colorado state parks is free today in a nod to what’s being called “Fresh Air Friday.”  

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

This fall, as thousands of hunters head into the Roaring Fork Valley’s backcountry, they may find more mountain lions, but fewer elk. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has the details of this year’s hunting landscape.

Aspen Public Radio News

For the first time in about 15 years, the Aspen-area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife may live in the Aspen area.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Mule deer may seem ubiquitous in the Roaring Fork Valley, but Colorado Parks and Wildlife say numbers of the species are below its target in some key areas near Rifle. The state agency plans to kill mountain lions and bears in an effort to help grow the deer population.

Courtesy of aspenpitkin.com

Bears are crafty and have good memories, and when they’re hungry, it’s a lot easier to dig into the neighbor’s trash than to find a dozen pounds of berries.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is encouraging anglers to catch and keep as many fish as possible at Harvey Gap State Park near Silt.

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Three mountain lion kittens that had been hanging out on the Rio Grande Trail near Carbondale have moved on - in one way or another.

 

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Bear activity closed campgrounds, a moose charged a woman and her dog, and three mountain lion kittens were spotted along the Rio Grande trail — all in one day earlier this summer. Perry Will, area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), said days like this are becoming the new norm.

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

In its attempt to get more social media followers, the Aspen Police Department had a bit of fun with the resort’s reputation as a party town.

Small plastic bag found at grocery store checkout causes internet stir

And time will tell if two developers who want to build lodging at the base of Aspen Mountain can play well together.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

There is a primary election this month among three candidates for Pitkin County commissioner. In a forum held this week, accusations flew from one candidate to another about conflicts of interest.

http://www.aspendailynews.com/section/columnist/171422

Housing, open space dominate 'Squirm Night'

Michael Buglione / Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

Wildlife experts confirmed Monday which mountain lion was involved in last week’s attack on a child in Woody Creek.

Moose are starting to appear in more populated areas in Colorado. One was spotted only a couple of weeks ago in Glenwood Springs. Experts/wildlife officials said this is expected to become more common as the moose population continues to grow in the state. Aspen Public Radio’s Barbara Platts has the story.

courtesy photo / Garfield County Library

The Rifle library was chosen as one of eight libraries statewide to participate in a pilot backpack check-out program.

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