Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Kathleen Tadvick/Colorado Parks and Wildlife

There’s a debate happening about how to manage a chicken-like bird that calls part of Garfield County home. Last week county commissioners submitted a 1000 page package to the Bureau of Land Management. The agency’s drawing up a plan for how to protect the greater sage grouse whose population is shrinking. County officials fear protection could mean strict regulations for the oil and gas industry.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

A mudslide near downtown Basalt has forced Colorado Parks and Wildlife to lower the water level at a popular fishing hole. 

The small slide happened on a hillside near a reservoir at the Lake Christine State Wildlife Area over the weekend of April 18th and 19th. The slide took out a few trees, but didn’t damage structures. Mud slid all the way to Two Rivers Road.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants input on how it should operate in the coming years. The agency generates its own $200 million dollar budget. The lion’s share comes from hunting licenses and similar fees. And that revenue is dropping because the agency is selling fewer licenses. CPW is looking for public input on how to make up for the losses, which could include new user fees. 

Ken Krehbiel

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reporting a handful of rare black bear sightings in the heart of winter. Warm weather in January and February got a few bears up and moving, and looking for food. 

Your Evening News - February 6th, 2015

Feb 6, 2015

Carbondale Police Suspect Meth Lab

Carbondale’s Police department is reporting a suspected methamphetamine lab in the center of town. Police chief Gene Schilling said this afternoon that officers visited a house yesterday about a block from Main Street.

Basalt Police Department

Bear activity in Basalt is picking up and Town Government is holding a series of public meetings to address the problem. At least nine bears have made neighborhoods in Old Town Basalt their home, and some have broken into vehicles and garages. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with Police Chief Greg Knott who says his department has responded to more bear calls this year, compared to the year before.

Colorado’s mule deer population has been shrinking for years and wildlife officials are trying to bring it back up. In 2006, the population numbered 600,000. That dropped by almost half last year. Hunters say they notice the shortage, specifically in northwest Colorado. On Saturday, Colorado Parks and Wildlife will present ideas on how to increase the population at a special summit in Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jody Kennedy of Parks and Wildlife.

Bears are increasingly being drawn into Aspen this summer as their natural foods up high are late to bloom. Early Sunday a black bear swiped at a woman in a downtown alley. And, the number of bear-related calls to police have spiked in July. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

So far in 2014, the Aspen Police Department has handled 150 calls, from bears digging through garbage to questions about local trash laws. Five callers reported bears breaking into homes. Police Department spokesperson Blair Weyer says so far it’s a moderate year for bear activity.

“Have you heard about the moose?”

Jul 11, 2014

Moose are showing up this summer at one of Aspen’s most popular destinations; the Maroon Bells.  Already there have been reports of moose charging hikers and the Forest Service closed the trails there for a day this week. The trails have reopened but rangers are warning visitors to be aware of the potential danger.  As Aspen Public Radio’s Dorothy Atkins explains they are also considering other options.

Anda Rojs Smalls

Unlike other Western states, Colorado’s moose population is growing. It’s healthier than ever with an estimated 2300 moose across the state. While other states are grappling with why their herds are shrinking, Colorado is studying the population’s fast growth. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.