Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

  

Law enforcement officers with Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) say they’re seeing more hunters using drones to track wildlife. 

Courtesy of Colorado Mountain College

Gov. John Hickenlooper recently appointed Glenwood Springs resident Dr. Carrie Hauser to the state’s Parks and Wildlife Commission. This board sets rules and oversees state parks and wildlife programs.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat down with Hauser to talk about the appointment.

Courtesy of Colorado Mountain College

Glenwood Springs resident Carrie Hauser has been appointed by the governor to serve on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Now that an affiliate of the Aspen Skiing Co. has closed on the sale of Intrawest and Mammoth Resorts, many are waiting for the equivalent of Vail Resorts’ Epic Pass to be offered for the 16 ski areas we are now linked with.

And leading up to the deal, which is worth of billions of dollars, the SkiCo had its sights set on a much smaller piece of the ski industry pie.

With summer here, people are flocking to the outdoors, including the trails, campsites and reservoirs of the Colorado State Parks system. Last year, the parks hit a record number of visitors – 13.5 million.  But Colorado is struggling to keep up with the demand.

Golden Gate Canyon State Park is rolling and green, nestled deep in the Rocky Mountain foothills. Just 45 minutes from Denver, this is the state’s fourth most popular state park. It stays that way for most of the year.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me in the studio this week are Brent Gardner-Smith, executive director of Aspen Journalism and Andy Stone, former editor of the Aspen Times, as well as Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent speaking via Skype.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Visitors at Ruedi Reservoir this summer will find new gates at the boat ramp, as officials are restricting access so they can more effectively screen for invasive species of mussels. Keeping these creatures out of the reservoir is top priority.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Young and newborn wildlife often attract the attention of well-meaning citizens. Wildlife agencies and local nonprofits are reminding people to keep their distance.

courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Boaters headed to Ruedi Reservoir will find new gates at the boat ramp, restricting access to only times when officials can screen for two destructive species of mussels. In years past, officials have been running boat inspections five days a week; that’s been increased to seven days a week, from dawn to dusk this summer.

Courtesy of Betty Severy

Local law enforcement responded to at least three calls in the past week regarding traffic hangups as a result of wildlife on the roads — but in a new twist, these delays were caused by a turkey. The bird had been hanging around the median of Highway 82 between the Maroon Creek Bridge and the airport for over a week.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Recent genetic studies on native cutthroat trout in Colorado revealed a previously unrecognized subspecies in the Roaring Fork Valley — one that is so new it still doesn’t have a name. As part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series, Kendall Bakich with Colorado Parks and Wildlife will discuss how understanding the history of these trout can help preserve species diversity.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Energy development in northwest Colorado cuts roads and brings traffic into prime wildlife habitat. Researcher George Wittemyer studies how such development impacts deer populations and will speak about his work as part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series this week.

Carolyn Sackariason

 Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The winter months are prime time for spotting coyotes, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) officials warn that the predators may become more aggressive in January and February.

Coyotes breed in the first months of the year. CPW officials say as the predators pair up to find space to have their young, they can become more territorial and hostile.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and Wyatt Orme present a compilation of the week’s news.

Topics include:

  • The City of Aspen works on reducing the volume of construction waste headed for the landfill

  • Organizers of the Aspen Ideas Festival gear up for next year’s gathering

  • Aspen Skiing Company’s workforce hits town

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission yesterday unanimously approved an experimental study to kill black bears and mountain lions in the Piceance Basin near Rifle.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission meets Wednesday to decide whether to kill more mountain lions and black bears near Rifle.

Courtesy of pitkincounty.com

The immensely popular Sky Mountain Park trails close Thursday for the winter season.

 

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails lead ranger Pryce Hadley said the closures are key to protecting wildlife, especially elk, during the most stressful season.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Colorado state parks are again joining a national movement to get people outside on Black Friday.

Entry to all 42 Colorado state parks is free today in a nod to what’s being called “Fresh Air Friday.”  

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

This fall, as thousands of hunters head into the Roaring Fork Valley’s backcountry, they may find more mountain lions, but fewer elk. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has the details of this year’s hunting landscape.

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