Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Voters in Aspen this week turned down a new lodge proposed on Main Street. Now, the developer is moving forward with an alternative.

With fresh snow, mountain roads are closing and buses are getting outfitted for skis.

Western Slope officials are making their message clear about the statewide water plan.

And, a proposed development in El Jebel has officers realizing there isn’t enough law enforcement in the area.

Facebook/Aspen's Community Center

Now that the electorate narrowly approved using Aspen City Hall for “community use” in the future, a group is moving forward with plans to return the building to its roots. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

Voter turnout improved on election day Tuesday (11/3) in Pitkin County. More than 5600 people turned in ballots. That's more than the last odd-year election, which yielded 4800 votes.

A majority of voters decided against Base 2 Lodge. It was the most controversial measure on the ballot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

The “no” vote won easily, even though the “pro” campaign had more money. Preliminary results show 62 percent of voters decided against building Base 2 lodge on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. 37 percent voted in favor of it.

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

Question 3A, which asks to continue a property tax to fund Aspen schools, is winning thus far with initial results in in Pitkin County.

The ballot measure so far is 66 percent for and 33 percent against. The $991,000 mill-levy override will help the district close the $1 million budget shortfall it faces for the next school year. It’s estimated the district will have to close a $4 million gap during the next five years.

John Maloy, superintendent of schools, says that the tax is critical for the school district.

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

There was a steady stream of voters flowing into the Aspen Jewish Community Center Tuesday. The Center served as a polling place for Aspen voters. Many voters said Question 2A brought them to the polls. If approved, a new hotel called Base 2 would be built on Main Street.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Denise Cross Photography

Newspapers around Colorado last month published endorsements for issues and candidates that voters will decide on Tuesday (11/3). The editorials explain complex issues and detail the paper's decision to support a certain candidate or ballot measure. But with smaller staffs and more media scrutiny, do the opinions of editorial boards matter as much as they once did? Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explored the issue.

Marci Krivonen


Aspen Valley Hospital is asking voters this fall to continue a property tax that has helped pay operating costs for the past twenty years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, there’s no formal opposition to Question 5A, but voters are wondering when enough is enough when it comes to medical costs.


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In a matter of a month, the issue committee backing Base 2 lodge on the fall ballot has spent nearly $30,000. Election groups filed their final campaign finance reports with the City of Aspen on Tuesday (10/27). 

Citizens for Aspen Alive is working to get people to vote yes on Question 2A. It would allow developer Mark Hunt’s Base 2 lodge to be built on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. Hunt’s the lone contributor to the issue committee, spending $50,000 of his own money on things like mailers, newspaper advertising, t-shirts, pizza and beer.

Marci Krivonen

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

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