Elise Thatcher

On Tuesday night, Carbondale Town Trustees considered yet another aspect of marijuana in the midvalley. They approved $20,000 for the Roaring Fork School District for mental health counseling, and to educate kids and parents about pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with with the District’s Chief Academic Officer, Rob Stein.

Elise Thatcher

Carbondale’s marijuana industry is growing, and once again, the Doctor’s Garden is at the forefront. In 2014, the business opened the first retail marijuana store in the Roaring Fork Valley. Now, a new branch of that business has gotten the go-ahead to extract marijuana oil and make edibles with it.

Elise Thatcher

Officials in the midvalley are trying to find a way to join forces on two big issues: childcare and affordable housing. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher was at an unusual collaborative meeting last night and has this report.     

Today is Memorial Day, and recent changes for veterans aim to make it easier for former service members to get medical care in rural areas, like the Roaring Fork Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this update.

Pitkin County

  Pitkin County is looking at buying more property. The County says it’s considering purchasing the Deer Creek Ranch parcel in Snowmass Canyon. The nearly 40 acre property is listed for sale at $2.9 million but the County is looking at offering $2.5 million. If purchased, it would be managed by the County’s Open Space and Trails program.

Figuring out when, or how, to retire can be daunting, and one Snowmass Village resident is hoping to make it a little easier for people her age. Donna Davis is the author of “Retirement Basics, Help for Broke Baby Boomers.” She talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about the most common issues readers write to her about.

Elise Thatcher

The rental housing shortage in the mid Roaring Fork Valley is ratcheting up. As Aspen Public Radio has reported, rapidly increasing prices and restrictions are having a significant impact on residents. In our second story in our series, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher takes a look at the subsidized housing options in the Mid-Valley.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen Public Radio held a live debate last night between Aspen City Council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland, who are battling it out in the spring runoff election. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this overview of what went down, and a full recording of the debate.

Elise Thatcher

A new bus drivers’ union in the area is stretching its wings. Full time drivers with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority voted in February to start a local chapter of a national transit worker union. Ed Cortez is the President and business agent for the Aspen Local 774 of the Amalgamated Transit Union He sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher to talk about where the union is now.

Garfield County

Carbondale community members and Garfield County Commissioners are one step closer to resolving an access dispute. On Monday County commissioners were supposed to put the issue to rest, but those involved hadn’t collaborated on a solution.

Elise Thatcher

Ballots for Aspen’s runoff election go in the mail this Friday, and early voting begins on Monday at City Hall, as residents choose between grassroots activist Bert Myrin and longtime civil servant Mick Ireland. They’re battling it out for an Aspen City Council seat. The election will be run nearly identical to the one that ended earlier this month.

Hamilton Pevec

Former Carbondale resident Hamilton Pevec is in the middle of the aid effort in Nepal. After the country’s second major earthquake, he and his wife, Devika, are going back out to villages where people are trying to recover. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Pevec.

Grayson Schaffer

Glenwood Springs is a contender for being one of Outside magazine’s best towns. Such listings can be music to the ears of town promoters, but can also increase the demand for local resources, like housing. As Aspen Public Radio is reporting this month, the lack of rental housing in the Roaring Fork Valley is having a significant effect on locals. Jonah Ogles is Senior Editor with Outside Magazine, and talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says Outside often gets criticism for listing communities as desirable.

Joleen Cohen

Finding decent housing in Aspen and parts of the Roaring Fork Valley has always been difficult. But the increasing shortage in rentals, especially in the Mid-Valley, is having a significant impact on residents. In the first in our series about housing in the Valley, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.

Aspen Skiing Company is planning a makeover for the top of Aspen Mountain. Ski Co attracts summer visitors with mountaintop yoga, lunch and hiking, as well as concerts and other events. Now the company wants to do what it calls enhancements to the area, including making it more kid friendly.

“Phase 1 is going to consist of some Rocky Mountain flower gardens, picnic areas, new signage,” says Ski Co’s Assistant PR manager, Tucker Vest. “[As well as] kids play features such as hay bales, bean bag toss.”

Work has already started. In summers past there’s been a sharp contrast between the amenities of the Sundeck and uneven, bare ground nearby. Ski Co is planning a Phase 2 project, but what it will entail and when it is scheduled is not yet known.

Elise Thatcher

The lease for Krabloonik Fine Dining and Dogsledding could be officially confirmed this week. Snowmass Town Council has approved most of the updated lease, but a few more details are being added in.

Roaring Fork Conservancy

  Cattle Creek has a problem. The stream crosses under Highway 82 at the Cattle Creek intersection southeast of Glenwood Springs, and there are signs it’s not healthy. Heather Lewin is Watershed Action Director with the Roaring Fork Conservancy. The organization recently started a study to figure out what’s wrong in the creek. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Heather Lewin.

Elise Thatcher

Two Aspen political allies will have to definitely battle it out for a City Council seat. Longtime political servant Mick Ireland and grassroots organizer Bert Myrin will face off in June for a four year city council seat. Neither got enough votes in the spring election to land the post outright.

Elise Thatcher

There’s no answer yet on whether Aspen will have a runoff election in June. Election officials have until this evening to figure out whether twenty-three ballots are valid. They’ve already confirmed that three qualify to be counted.

Elise Thatcher

Aspen voters re-elected their mayor and kept a city council member. A second council seat is to be determined. It was a night of awkward moments, as incumbent Mayor Steve Skadron once again bested Torre. The two went toe to toe in a runoff two years ago. This time, Skadron won handily, by about 400 votes.

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