Glenwood Springs

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

A judge has released hundreds of pages of court documents in the Nancy Pfister case. We’ll have a quick review.

The sheriffs are in town-- for a statewide conference. This is a chance for Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo to show off his work in Aspen.

Officials and local representatives are tackling how to get faster internet access in rural areas.

Aspen wants to get more people to build hotel rooms...

And, Garfield County may have to help pay for some improvements near Glenwood’s Grand Avenue Bridge.

An Aspen nonprofit is heralding the cancelation of a mega dam project in Chile.

And a hydropower plant in southwest Colorado is now officially up and running… we’ll hear what that means for the Aspen.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Tsiouvaras Simmons Holderness

Paying for big construction projects gets really expensive really quickly. So the Colorado Department of Transportation often has a limited amount to spend on new roads or interchanges. But as planning for the new Grand Bridge in Glenwood Springs continues, lots of related improvements are creeping in, and CDOT can’t necessarily pay for all of them. Joe Elsen is the agency’s lead engineer on project. He recently spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher, and says Garfield County may have to pitch in.

Craig Gaskill/Tsiouvaras Simmons Holderness

Getting around Glenwood Springs can be tricky in places. The main bridge on Grand Avenue across town is narrow. And intersections getting on and off Interstate 70 can be confusing. Plus, the bridge isn't safe… that's according to the Colorado Department of Transportation, or CDOT. So a new bridge and interchange are in the works. 

Elise Thatcher

Officials in Glenwood Springs want to know what residents think about a new bridge. No, not the Grand Avenue Bridge over I- 70. The city is taking comments on what would be a new way to get from Highway 82 to a certain part of town.

Reporter: Getting from Highway 82 to southwest Glenwood Springs can be a real pain… especially when there’s traffic. So there’s a plan to add a new bridge. It would go from the highway, over the Roaring Fork River to Airport Road on the West Side of town. Terri Partch is with the Glenwood Springs engineering department.

Marci Krivonen

A member of the Ute Indian Tribe is holding traditional sweats in Glenwood Springs in an effort to keep his culture alive. Each month, Kenny Frost takes a small group into the depths of a cave warmed by natural hot springs. The cave is where his ancestors came to heal. And, he hopes his sweats bring back to life a culture that’s losing its traditions quickly. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

UDATE: August 16th, 2013 - 9:00pm

The fire is 100% contained and management of the blaze will be returned to local agencies early tomorrow morning. The evacuation order for residents who live on the backside of Lookout Mountain, has been lifted. Over the weekend, crews will continue to monitor for hot spots and rehab fire lines. Red Canyon Road (County Road 115) remains closed to traffic. Two minor injuries were reported on the fire today. One firefighter was treated for heat exhaustion and another individual received stitches on a cut. The cost of fighting the fire is over $1 million.

Garfield County Sheriff's Office

The primary suspect in a fatal glenwood springs shooting turned himself in yesterday. Freddy Argueta Cabrera is currently in custody in Mesa County. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The shooting happened Wednesday night near an apartment complex, south of Glenwood, just outside the city limits. Walt Stowe is a spokesman for the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office.

Marci Krivonen

The summer season is beginning, and with it comes river recreation of all kinds in the Roaring Fork Valley. In our area, we’re used to roaring rivers and thrilling rapids. But, in other communities, rivers that once roared are still and quiet now. And, it’s a problem. An engineering firm in Glenwood Springs is working to put the rapids back in rivers damaged by human intervention. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Immigration lawyers around Colorado are warning their clients of a special kind of fraud. Every time there’s a change in immigration law, or a potential change, notarios pop up. Notarios offer cheap services to those in the immigrant community, and make promises to get things like work permits and visas. In the end though, many immigrants end up scammed out of their money, sometimes deported or sent to jail. That’s what happened to Virginia Mancinas. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.
 

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