Health

Aspen Institute

There’s a big push to get kids more physically active, but some kids are already playing sports regularly-- maybe even too often. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Tom Farrey talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher. He writes for ESPN and directs the Sports and Society program at the Aspen Institute. Farrey says there’s growing concern about kids overdoing it.

Brent James/ Institute for Health Care Delivery Research

The Affordable Care Act has changed a lot for doctors and other medical professionals. There are new insurance requirements, potentially lots more patients and the logistics of switching to digital medical records. Doctor Brent James is right in the middle of all of this, fine tuning the answer to an age old problem: how do you take care of patients in a way that’s really effective, but not overwhelmingly expensive? Dr. James is Executive Director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research in Salt Lake City. As part of our spring series on key health issues, James talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Deciding between doctors, treatments, and, surgeries can be exhausting, and often especially hard when juggling a serious diagnosis. Boston Physician Pamela Hartzband noticed this after practicing medicine for years, and she and a colleague have written a book on how to navigate those decisions. It’s called Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. Dr. Hartzband will speak at the Aspen Ideas Festival this summer. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Dr. Hartzband spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

CeDAR/University of Colorado Hospital

 Treating drug addictions can be gender specific, and that's part of the therapy at the Center for Dependency, Addiction, and Rehabilitation at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver. Ben Cort represents the Center, and sat down with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

http://justforthehealthofit9hf.blogspot.com/

    Starting next year, residents in Pitkin, Eagle, and Garfield county could pay less for health insurance. State Insurance officials decided Friday to change how insurance companies come up with monthly premium prices. But the state’s top insurance official says that won’t get to the root of the problem.

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