Health

Join Us for a Live Show on Heart Health

Jan 14, 2014
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Join Aspen Public Radio for a special live radio show with Dr. Robert Eckel, and local cardiologists, Dr. Gordon Gerson and Dr. Marcus Howell on heart health. Moderated by Dr. Ann Mass.

Tuesday, January 28. Noon - 1pm.

Red Brick Center for the Arts, Rehearsal Space.

$15/person ($10/person for APR members).

Office of Governor John Hickenlooper

    Governor John Hickenlooper says he could get involved with bringing down health insurance prices. That could have a real impact for residents of the Roaring Fork Valley and other mountain towns. Garfield County asked the state's top official earlier this month to intervene with high premiums. The County believes Colorado officials did a sloppy job earlier this year when coming up with prices. But some experts say the state didn't make any mistakes.

Rick Reinhard

  Healthcare premiums under the Affordable Care Act are more expensive in the Roaring Fork Valley than in many parts of the state. They’re high in other mountain counties, too. Governor John Hickenlooper may get involved in bringing down those prices. Garfield County has asked him to intervene, arguing state officials did a bad job earlier this year when coming up with rates. Aspen Public Radio asked a national healthcare expert if the state failed to follow the rules. Reporter Elise Thatcher spoke with Alan Weil.

Mountain Valley Developmental Services is a non-profit who provides services and support to over 450 individuals with developmental disabilities in Eagle, Lake, Garfield and Pitkin county. The most common issue Mountain Valley works with is children prone to developmental disabilities. Executive Director Bruce Christensen and Human Resources director Dana Peterson, discuss Mountain Valley's children and family programs.   

Glenda Greenwald, founder Aspen Brain Forum and Kevin Ward, president of Aspen Strategy Center on the Aspen Brain Lab: Explore your Creative, Healthy, Impaired and Future Brain featuring 15 experts, Saturday August 10 from 8:30am-4:30pm at the Aspen Institute.

www.aspenbrainlab.com

Study Gives "Tree of Life" New Meaning

Jul 3, 2013
John Hritz / Flickr (user jhritz)

A sudden loss in the number of trees around you may slightly increase your chances for death. That's what a study from the US Forest Service published earlier this year suggests. Scientists found that areas with mass-tree deaths from beetle infestations had  increased numbers of cardiovascular and lower-respiratory related deaths.

Hope on the Horizon: New Strategies for the Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

One out of three individuals may be affected by Alzheimer’s Disease by the age of 80. Leading research scientists have hope, however, that this most insidious illness might reverse itself.

Howard Fillit & Ezekiel Emanuel

mill56 - Flickr

The scientific community agrees: exercise does a body good. When comparing a sedentary lifestyle spent on the couch versus being an active cross-country skier, the recommendation from doctors is a no brainer: Go grab those skis! Which is a lesson Aspenites have long taken to heart. But a recent study from Sweden complicates the simplistic “exercise is good” mantra that we are used to hearing.

That's the sound of 15-thousand cross country skiers simultaneously embarking on a grueling 90 km course. This is the Vasaloppet in Sweden.

Two speakers from the upcoming Aspen Ideas Fest:

Heather Smith, President of "Rock the Vote"

Dr. Mitch Besser, Founder/Medical Director of "mothers2mothers"

Jesse Lujan

Colorado is one of nearly twenty states putting together a kind of cooperative health care purchasing program. It’s called an exchange, and it’s starting under the recent health care overhaul often called "Obamacare". Enrollment starts in October and it could mean big changes for Native Americans in Colorado. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher recently spoke with Ernest House Junior. He’s Executive Director of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs. House started by explaining what health care options Native Americans have now.

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