Marci Krivonen

This week there are a few more clues, and lots of money, in the Nancy Pfister case.

Verizon customers saw a huge glitch in service this week.

It can be tough to run a retail business in Aspen, so we’ll find out what it takes.

We’ll also go to a busy clinic where busy doctors are serving a growing number of medicaid patients after the Obamacare deadline.

Glenwood Springs inches closer to getting a new bridge in downtown.

And locals are weighing in on how the state tackles water needs.

Computers at Valley View Hospital were hacked recently and patient information was compromised. Turns out, hacking at hospitals isn’t that uncommon.

Plentiful snowfall this ski season helped bring people to the slopes. Tourism officials say Aspen’s economy is improving.

An issue over the length of wingspans on regional jets is posing a problem at the Aspen airport.

And, mental health is discussed at a Downvalley forum. The problem of suicide has been top of mind this winter.

An Aspen rabbi earns accolades for his ability to inspire his congregation.

And…a Hopi Indian tribal member talks about how development has overtaken many ancestral lands, including in Aspen.

Defense attorneys in the Nancy Pfister case are digging through lots of evidence.

Spring snow showers have boosted snowpack to above-average levels and forecasts are calling for high river flows this spring.

A Western Slope lawmaker is proposing Colorado get its own firefighting fleet of airplanes and helicopters.

And, wildfire is on the minds of local officials who are planning ahead after devastating fires in recent years, on the Front Range.

Suicide is getting attention in the Aspen community, after several deaths this winter.

And, we have some fun with what could be the Upper Valley’s first home inspired hybrid.

A long-time local accused of murdering Aspen resident Nancy Pfister was in court on Wednesday. Kathy Carpenter is one of three arrested for the crime.

Voters in Basalt next week will elect three new Town Council members. We hear from business owners about what they want from the elected officials.

Across the nation the number of heroin and opiate overdoses is increasing...and, there’s an uptick in heroin use here in the Roaring Fork Valley.

We talk with two young men who have struggled with heroin addiction...they describe the pain of running out of the drug and the threat of overdose.

Hackers got access to thousands of medical records from Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs. We have the latest. Three people charged with murdering Aspen native Nancy Pfister appear in court... And after one of the hearings, Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo decided to change how he talks about the case.

We take a look at just how busy the Rio Grande trail really is. And, students in local schools are spending more time with environmental science.

Finally, Basalt is halfway through an unconventional strategy for reinvigorating downtown.

Mountain Edition - March 13th, 2014

Mar 13, 2014

Residents in Pitkin County are mostly satisfied with how their tax dollars are being spent. Still, there are some concerns.

Models in Aspen are showing off the latest in outdoor fashion this week. Aspen International Fashion Week starts today.

Whiskey sales are surging for the first time in 30 years...and one local whiskey-maker is jumping into the action.

In a recent federal crackdown on Aspen businesses, restaurants were found to be the biggest violators of not paying workers enough in overtime.

The Paralympics are underway in Sochi and eight athletes who train in Aspen are competing. We highlight one skier who was born without a femur...and another who races in a mono-ski.

Today, we’ll bring you the latest with the investigation into the murder of Aspen native Nancy Pfister.

Republicans and Democrats are whittling down the contenders for state and local elections this fall.

Aspen’s first recreational pot shop starts selling buds… and we find out how much Carbondale has made on marijuana taxes.

And we hear from a Paralympic coach who arrived in Sochi this week. With the international tensions in nearby Ukraine, we’ll hear how safe athletes are feeling.

Mountain Edition - February 13th, 2014

Feb 13, 2014

A new report says there isn’t enough natural gas in the Thompson Divide to make it worth drilling. But the industry argues there aren’t enough facts to say if the leases would be a bust…

A new marijuana task force is meeting for the first time today. The goal is to monitor the effects of recreational pot on the Roaring Fork Valley.

The City of Aspen’s utility wants to run on 100-percent renewable energy and its enlisted the help of a government laboratory to help them get there. Aspen will inch closer to its renewable goal when it starts taking power from a new hydro plant in Ridgway later this month.

Local teenagers are getting a lesson on slam poetry. Two performance artists are visiting schools this week, teaching kids how to write and deliver “spoken word” poetry.

Finally, a Durango biathlete is competing in Sochi tomorrow. Her story is a unique one - she owes her Olympic bid to her twin sister.

Aspen and other parts of the Upper Valley are still digging out from last week’s historic snowstorm and there’s more powder in the forecast.

And all that snowpack is good news for farmers and ranchers in the Roaring Fork Valley.

The Aspen community continues to grapple with the recent loss of a beloved newspaper editor. We take a look at how hard it can be to prevent suicide.

On a lighter note, soon it’ll be much easier to speed through security at Aspen’s airport, a Catholic monk in Old Snowmass is featured in a new movie and the Olympic Games have kicked off in Sochi… we’ll talk with an Aspen athlete who’s settling in and getting ready to compete. We’ll also hear the latest on security concerns at the games in Russia.

With just eight days until the Olympics start in Sochi...the Aspen community sends off four local athletes who will compete.

Health care prices in the Valley have been rising for years. Now, a handful of local employers are trying to improve worker’s health--and bring down costs.

Basalt’s setting a path for its future...in a non-traditional way. It’s using a method called “crowd-sourcing” to gather input on urban planning.

A new group in Aspen wants to make it easier for young people to stay in Aspen. City council approved the Next Generation Advisory Commission this week.

And, as Colorado’s population grows, the state’s water supply can’t keep up. A Basalt organization is involved in a statewide water plan.

Terrain parks are ubiquitous at ski resorts around the country. Now, there’s an effort to make them safer.

Finally, Aspen’s Torin Yater-Wallace is heading to the Olympics. The freeskier is recovering from injuries...but, says he’s ready to compete.

Pages