Native Americans

Aspen Ute Foundation

Ancestors of Aspen’s first inhabitants visited the area over the weekend. A Native American pow wow downtown Saturday included singing, drumming and dancing. Members of the Northern and Southern Ute tribes took part, as well as the Hopi and Pueblo tribes. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to one of the participants. Moontee Sinquah is a Hopi tribal member from Arizona.

Indian Law and Order Commission

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is often associated with veterans, and hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan combat vets have been diagnosed. But another group of people in the US with an even higher rate of PTSD… and they have never been to a foreign war zone. That’s according to out November 2013 by a presidential commission.

Heavy flooding on the Front Range has resulted in a mess. Oil and animal excrement from feedlots have spilled into or near rivers. The flooding put dams on the Front Range to the test as walls of water rushed down canyons and into towns. We’ll talk to the chief of dam safety for the state. The Roaring Fork Valley deals with suicide often more than other Colorado communities. One local non profit is trying to change that. Federal health care reform kicks into high gear next week when people can shop online for insurance. But, even with insurance, some patients struggle to get care. And, every month a Ute Indian spiritual leader leads a sweat in a cavern in Glenwood Springs. We’ll take you to the healing ceremony. And finally, we’ll introduce you to a local winter Olympic hopeful who learned to ride horses before she got on skis.

Marci Krivonen

A member of the Ute Indian Tribe is holding traditional sweats in Glenwood Springs in an effort to keep his culture alive. Each month, Kenny Frost takes a small group into the depths of a cave warmed by natural hot springs. The cave is where his ancestors came to heal. And, he hopes his sweats bring back to life a culture that’s losing its traditions quickly. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

If you get a DUI, your blood sample isn’t going to the state lab any more... that’s because the Colorado health department wasn’t handling them properly. We’ll get an update on what that means for drug and alcohol cases.

Indian Tribes across the west are strengthening their sovereignty by getting involved in natural resource development on or near reservations. The tribes in Colorado are involved in two hydro projects.

And fires may be burning differently-- because of changing weather, trees, and other factors. That means changes are in store for how firefighters take on wildfires.

Carbondale writer Jon Waterman has a new book out--after detailing the winding journey of the Colorado River, he’s put together what he calls a handbook for a life intertwined with the outdoors.

And, We’ll get a preview of three exhibitions opening in Basalt this weekend... they’re all by women artists.


Jesse Lujan

Colorado is one of nearly twenty states putting together a kind of cooperative health care purchasing program. It’s called an exchange, and it’s starting under the recent health care overhaul often called "Obamacare". Enrollment starts in October and it could mean big changes for Native Americans in Colorado. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher recently spoke with Ernest House Junior. He’s Executive Director of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs. House started by explaining what health care options Native Americans have now.