Rio Grande Trail

Hackers got access to thousands of medical records from Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs. We have the latest. Three people charged with murdering Aspen native Nancy Pfister appear in court... And after one of the hearings, Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo decided to change how he talks about the case.

We take a look at just how busy the Rio Grande trail really is. And, students in local schools are spending more time with environmental science.

Finally, Basalt is halfway through an unconventional strategy for reinvigorating downtown.

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

An increasing number of groups want to use the Rio Grande Trail to host events like running and cycling races. So, Pitkin County commissioned a survey. The results show how many people use the trail during peak times and whether there’s a tolerance from the public for additional events. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Over a decade ago, Pitkin County Open Space and Trails Director Dale Will says it was common to see local, non-profit races on the Rio Grande like the Buddy Program’s annual 5-mile race. But in recent years, interest in holding such races has shot up.