KAJX

Rio Grande Trail

Valley Roundup for Morning Edition, Aug. 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me this week are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News. I’m Carolyn Sackariason and you are listening to Valley Roundup, an analysis and commentary of the week’s news with writers and editors. We continue our conversation with Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Lorenzo Semple, columnist for the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

Courtesy of Brett Meredith/RFTA

Beginner mountain bikers will soon have a new place to play, but first the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) needs help building it.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails is investing millions of dollars in an effort to preserve St. Jude’s Ranch in Basalt.

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Three mountain lion kittens that had been hanging out on the Rio Grande Trail near Carbondale have moved on - in one way or another.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

A section of the Rio Grande Trail in Carbondale is getting a bit of a makeover. Flowers and hops have been planted. Invasive tree species removed … And now art is being added. That’s part of the new Rio Grande ArtWay plan that was unveiled last night. It’s part of a project to update a section of the trail with art and signage that help point users toward businesses and art centers.

Courtesy, Carbondale Creative District

Signs directing people to places like galleries, breweries and restaurants are being posted along the Rio Grande Trail and in Carbondale over the next month to direct people to the arts in town. That’s part of an effort to bolster the Carbondale art’s community while the town tries to become a certified Colorado Creative District.

Lazy Glen bridge to Rio Grande possible

Jan 19, 2016
Roaring Fork Transportation Agency

 The Lazy Glen subdivision could soon have access to the Rio Grande Trail via a bridge over the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County acquired adjacent riverfront property last year and is now seeking comment on its management.

Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies was denied their rail corridor license request when they went before the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority board last month. Yesterday, they came back with a modified proposal that increases safety measures and clarifies the location of the two desired connection points between the Rio Grande Trail and their Rock Bottom Ranch Eco-Education Trail System.

Valley Roundup - March 6th, 2015

Mar 6, 2015

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

RFTA bus drivers voted to unionize this week. It looks like better wages are on the horizon.

What can be done, if anything, about the valley’s dwindling workforce, low wages and high cost of living?

Meanwhile, over-use of the national forest is once again at the forefront of conversation. Expect to see more rangers patroling the Hanging Lake trail in Glenwood Canyon.

President Obama has recommended that police officers around the country wear body cameras. Is that necessary here?

And elected officials on the lower end of the valley are wondering whether they should continue to protect the Rio Grande trail for a future rail line.

Joining this week are Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, Editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Brent Gardner-Smith, executive director of Aspen Journalism and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

pitkinostprojects.com

Pitkin County is considering management changes in its latest update plan for the popular Rio Grande Trail. The plan examines the upper half of the 42 mile trail, from Emma to Aspen.

Under the plan, signs would be updated, trail connections, such as from the Aspen Village neighborhood to the trail, would be improved and a policy for special events may be developed.

Mountain Edition - March 20th, 2014

Mar 20, 2014

Hackers got access to thousands of medical records from Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs. We have the latest. Three people charged with murdering Aspen native Nancy Pfister appear in court... And after one of the hearings, Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo decided to change how he talks about the case.

We take a look at just how busy the Rio Grande trail really is. And, students in local schools are spending more time with environmental science.

Finally, Basalt is halfway through an unconventional strategy for reinvigorating downtown.

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

An increasing number of groups want to use the Rio Grande Trail to host events like running and cycling races. So, Pitkin County commissioned a survey. The results show how many people use the trail during peak times and whether there’s a tolerance from the public for additional events. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Over a decade ago, Pitkin County Open Space and Trails Director Dale Will says it was common to see local, non-profit races on the Rio Grande like the Buddy Program’s annual 5-mile race. But in recent years, interest in holding such races has shot up.